good philosophy?

Discussion in 'Racquets' started by ejewels, Jul 21, 2010.

  1. ejewels

    ejewels New User

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    So, I am a balanced 3.5 with a 4.0 serve on a good day. I use a APD GT and hit well with it, but I also have a YT Prestige MP which is more a player's stick. I was thinking that forcing myself to play with a prestige or a players stick would overall make me a better player, by forcing me to play more focused and rely on good form. Anyone agree with this philosophy? I was even thinking of getting the Volkyl PB 10 Mid because of the rave reviews. Would a 3.5 player benefit, or at this stage would it just hurt my game?
     
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  2. ProgressoR

    ProgressoR Hall of Fame

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    i have been playing 6 months and got a players stick due to arm issues, and i am probably not even close to 3.5 (i have been told 3.0 players would bagel me handily, though i didnt post vids yet) and i really enjoy it. It is low powered, flexy, it gives great control, very soft feel which i like, and i have to play a full stroke to make the ball do what i want to do. If you play a bad stroke it tells you pretty quickly. I would say go for it.
     
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  3. ejewels

    ejewels New User

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    Ya, I think I might. I heard the Volkyl plays a lot like a MP anyways... I just want some of the power of the APD GT.
     
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  4. BC1

    BC1 Professional

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    "power" is over-rated. Go with consistency and control and the power will eventually come with time and your improved strokes.

    No need to buy the volkl (though I'm sure it is a great racquet). Stick with the Prestige MP, and sell the APDGT so you don't go back-and-forth. Trust me, by getting rid of one of them you will save yourself a lot of mental distress!

    (Now if I could just listen to my own advice!)
     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2010
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  5. larry10s

    larry10s Hall of Fame

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    im sorry that since i got my vantage sticks several years ago i dont folllow the newer racquets. however i picked a 95 12+ oz 8 pt headlight "player racquet "for just the reason you stated. i wanted a racquet that rewarded good technique and did not mask poor technique. i think its helped me advance
    so yes i think its a good philosophy.
     
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  6. pyrokid

    pyrokid Hall of Fame

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    I think it's a good idea to not play with a tweener in general because they don't have enough feel to tell you what yer doin' wrong, but I also think goin' to the complete opposite spectrum is a bad idea too. You should go with a racquet like the k blabe 98, pure storm, or radical. They still give you something, but have enough feel to tell you when you're messing up so you can fix it. And on the shots where you just totally biff the stroke, you might still get some of them in you won't with the tweener.
    I thought the PSL was helping me by making me swing out and force me to take a very large stroke. But when I saw my strokes with the radical, I took the same size swing, with the only difference being I hit up more on it. So I hit a faster ball with much more spin. It's been about 2 weeks now and my strokes have stayed just as good as they were with the PSL.
    If I try and go to the APD though, I can't, because I can't feel when I hit it incorrectly.
     
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  7. BC1

    BC1 Professional

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    Good advice there, and I second the opinion about the kblade98 and radical. If you are going to be demoing some frames, definitely try the Radical (any version). IMO it's a great racquet no matter what your level or style of play and it will help you advance as a player. Plus it's easy to customize if you later want to go heavier. The Kblade98 is similar but to me feels heavier then the Radical and has a higher swingweight (at least mine does), plus it is stiffer and has more power - which may be good or bad depending on what you want.
     
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  8. ejewels

    ejewels New User

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    I've tried the Radical, but didn't really like it. I hit well with the APD GT. Not like Rafa or Tsonga, but good enough. I think I'll stay with that. I don't get the feel, but the power and spin is just crazy. I have lots of spin in my game. Is the PB 10 Mid really that great?
     
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  9. BC1

    BC1 Professional

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    If you like the power of the APDGT and can control it, then stick with it. If you decide you want more "feel" later then go to your Prestige. You've got two very good racquets already - stick with one of them until you know for sure what you are looking for.

    I've never tried the PB10 Mid, but I know it is a control stick. It should play more like the prestige.
     
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  10. pyrokid

    pyrokid Hall of Fame

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    It has a bit more pop than the prestige, but if you liked the aeropro, take BC1's advice and stay with it. The prestige and PB10 mid play nothing like it.
     
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  11. Agent Orynge

    Agent Orynge Professional

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    A different racquet isn't going to force you to be a better player, period. I'm not saying anyone should avoid less forgiving racquets because they are for 'players' only, but it's just going to be a source of frustration if it takes you too far out of your comfort zone.
     
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  12. fuzz nation

    fuzz nation Legend

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    Agent Orynge is offering a reasonable word of caution. If you want to take up with a racquet that's significantly tougher for you to play with, I think you need to be ready to take a serious leap of faith with your entire game. If you want to get significantly better, you're going to probably endure some "hard miles" where you get worse along the way before you even start to develop into a stronger player. This goes way beyond the racquet.

    I got a great deal a while ago on a pair of LM Prestige mids and I had to put a bundle of lead on their handles just so I could function with them on the courts. I figured they'd make good "training racquets", but I was also on a bit of a general campaign to become a better player. Everything needed to be addressed including my fitness, stroke mechanics, movement and preparation...

    At first, I could only muscle around these "demanding" frames for twenty or so minutes on the courts. When I say that I put up with this for weeks, I mean a whole lot more than just one or two. Maybe a month and a half later, I started to notice that during a good workout with the tree branches, my legs would fatigue instead of my arm. I was driving my strokes from the ground up with better timing and preparation.

    I doubt that my experiences follow a formula that's universal for everyone, but if you want to push yourself to improve and try using a heavier, more demanding racquet, be ready to put in some serious work. Even now I can't use my LMP's unless I'm playing sharp enough, but the long and challenging process I went through was ultimately good for me. When I am up to it, I can play with these frames more confidently than with anything else I have.
     
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