Grand Slam

Discussion in 'General Pro Player Discussion' started by Deuce, Sep 12, 2004.

  1. Deuce

    Deuce Banned

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    A not so parallel universe...
    I really hope that someone - male or female - wins THE Grand Slam next year - because maybe that will stop people from referring to each of the 4 Majors as a Grand Slam.

    Man, even Mary Carillo and Dick Enberg were doing it: "Roger Federer has won 3 Grand Slams this year", etc.

    For those of you who are unaware, the definition of a GRAND SLAM is one player winning all 4 Majors in a single year (Australian Open, Roland Garros, Wimbledon, and the U.S. Open).
     
  2. Camilio Pascual

    Camilio Pascual Hall of Fame

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    In tennis, we somehow have managed to resist standardizing terms as much as we can. It's frustrating and somehow quaintly charming at the same time. I tried using the term "Major(s)" or "Slam event" at times, but that does not catch on. As far as a Grand Slam goes, I define it as holding all 4 Majors titles consecutively. Many feel it is not one unless it is a Calendar Slam. Great, that lets out Martina's 6 in a row, a considerably greater achievement than a Calendar Slam. Your definition is agreed to by more, Deuce, but as you can see, it excludes a far greater and more difficult achievement. I also believe the Calendar Slam is not the most impressive Grand Slam. I'd be more impressed by somebody winning Roland Garros first and Wimby last since it would span almost a whole year's worth of time, unlike the Calendar Slam.
     
  3. rhubarb

    rhubarb Hall of Fame

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    The meaning of "Grand Slam" has certainly changed over the past 20-30 years. When I first watched tennis, I understood it to mean holding all 4 titles simultaneously.

    When Martina achieved this in the mid-eighties, I was astonished to see that it wasn't recognised as a bona fide Grand Slam, and seem to recall that the calendar year requirement was more an American addition. However, nowadays it seems to be accepted that a proper Grand Slam does mean calendar-year Grand Slam.

    Calling each of the tournaments "Grand Slam" is newish too, and does confuse some people, but generally acceptable now, as long it is clear from the context whether one individual tournament is meant, or the whole series. "Major" was not much used outside America, I don't think.
     

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