has anyone seen this doubles strategy?

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by spot, Feb 2, 2009.

  1. spot

    spot Hall of Fame

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    Just wondering if anyone has ever seen this before because I am still laughing about it. We were playing a mixed doubles match and our guy plays deuce court and the one thing he does REALLY well is absolutely annihilated his crosscourt return of serve from that side. When the other teams girl was serving she had absolutely no chance of getting it back- the ball might as well have been on a tee for him.

    SO of course the other team adjusts and they go australian. But the guy from my team doesn't care and still hits his crosscourt return and the net guy wanted absolutely no part of staying up at the net in the face of that rocket. So basically he stayed australian but went back to the baseline. So when they were serving from the deuce side, the server's partner was standing immediately to the right of the server! He was just trying to be there in case that crosscourt return of serve came back over. It didn't particularly work but it just was something I have NEVER seen that before and wanted to see if anyone else out there had ever come across this before.
     
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  2. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Basically, if you can't volley that return, you had better work on your volleys or get back to the baseline. He stood next to the server because he wanted to be on position to cover as much of his court as possible.
    He is talking to his partner RIGHT NOW, to tell her to serve to the backhand, mix in some slices and some moonball serves, serve extremely short and wide, hit some backspin serves, and mix things up on her serve. He doesn't want to eat any more tennis balls.
     
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  3. spot

    spot Hall of Fame

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    but have you seen someone stand to the RIGHT of the server when they are serving on the deuce side?

    The problem was clearly that this girl had no serve at all that could give my guy even the least bit of a problem. He was taking these returns from right around the service line on many occasions- I don't know that many people could volley that return hit right at them at the net. I don't think there is much they could have done other than hope that he would have some unforced errors. I just thought it was a creative bit of strategy that I likely wouldn't have thought of.
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2009
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  4. Kevo

    Kevo Hall of Fame

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    Never seen that, but kudos to them for recognizing a need to change strategies and trying something unorthodox.

    In that situation however, if you're the guy, you have to get in there and take your lumps at net. Hopefully you start getting something back after a couple of service games and can at least force a change of tactic on your opponent. Standing back will just allow the returner to keep blasting away at will and gaining offense.
     
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  5. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Don't matter WHERE he stands if he doesn't interfere with the serve.
    Standing there, he takes the opponents natural crosscourt forehand.
    He can stand in the stands, for all the rules care, or even sit in the referee's box.
     
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  6. Djokovicfan4life

    Djokovicfan4life Legend

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    I've seen this in action before, but not from the baseline as you speak of. What you're describing is just an excuse for inferior net play. Nothing more, nothing less. There's no better feeling in doubles than cutting off what your opponent thought was an incredible shot and punching it into the open court for an easy winner. So your friend just needs more practice at net. Tell that guy to work on his net play until he feels comfortable with this. It's important to want to be at net when playing doubles. When poaching move FORWARDS as well as sideways to ensure that your first volleys are hit right on top of the net.

    I'm no expert, but I think that this same formation used with the other player at net could be extremely beneficial at times, since it forces all of the baseline rallies to be down the line exchanges. I think it would work well against more baseline oriented teams that dislike having to change directions frequently. JMO.
     
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  7. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Well, it's a mixed match, with an inferior girls serve, so it puts his team in jeapardy.
    Haven't you guys ever partnered with a really weak, slow, non spinning serve to your opponents FOREHAND constantly, with never a thought to the backhand? Opponent just blasts the ball into your hitting side hip, over and over again. Yes, you hit a few winners off it, but basically, you're just target practice.
     
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  8. Djokovicfan4life

    Djokovicfan4life Legend

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    First of all, most women aren't even thinking about placement to begin with. As you probably already know, most of them are strictly back court specialists, so the majority of them see the serve simply as a means of beginning the point, and nothing more. Also, when playing other women the forehand is typically much weaker than the backhand. I've played a couple mixed matches were I won against two fairly strong players because my partner was actually running around the forehand and crushing her backhand returns. This should be a little telling to you. :)

    It is very important to cater tyour strategy towards the strengths of the women player. Since you're probably the stronger player more often than not, it's just silly to force her to adapt to your style of play rather than making the slight adjustments necessary to your own game for the sake of good doubles tennis.
     
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  9. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Actually, I wasn't talking specifically about mixed matches here. Some men's have slow, non spinny, weak serves to the forehand over and over again.
    And me, always partnered with the worst, slowest serving and slowest moving inept partner, can be setup by a 5.0's heavy forehand down my hitting side hip. Me no like!
    Sure, mostly I can volley into the open court, but faced against a harder hitter, maybe 5.5, then it's just plain bad serving.
    I haven't seen that girl with a better backhand than forehand yet. YET!
     
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  10. Spokewench

    Spokewench Semi-Pro

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    You obviously have not ever met me!

    spoke
     
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  11. Djokovicfan4life

    Djokovicfan4life Legend

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    You cannot be serious. Examples of this concept are everywhere, all the way up to the pro tour. Look at Jelena Jankovic, former # 1 in the world for a shining example of this.
     
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  12. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Talking returning serves...
    Yes, some players have MORE CONSISTENT backhand returns of serve, but not harder, not more forcing, not able to produce as many winners.
    See, you think better as "more consistent".
    On serves, you don't worry about the "more consistent" side, you worry about the big winner that the opponent can hit.
    On most important points, I'd rather serve to the "more consistent" side hoping there is no WINNER return comiing from there. On the forehand side, sure they might miss more, but they can easily hit a winner too....
    Since I'm not partnering with JJ or ElenaDementieva any time soon, those examples just don't apply here.
     
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  13. Spokewench

    Spokewench Semi-Pro

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    Once again Lee, you are incorrect. I can return serve on my backhand side and make it a winner - even down the line. If I hit a winner on a return of serve on my forehand, it is only because the serve is so weak as to make it a joke! I do not ever worry about the big winner serve - why would I?
     
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  14. Djokovicfan4life

    Djokovicfan4life Legend

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    No, I was referring to flat winner capabilities, actually. Did your jump to conclusions mat arrive early this year or something?

    You do realize that your experience as a player may vary from mine, right?
     
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  15. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    You are correct, my experience with women's tennis is different than yours...
    Mine.... I have practiced and hit with CeciMartinez (pro), MarciLouie (pro), PeanutLouie (pro), DanaGilbert (pro), SusanBrown (pro), Marna and MarissaLouie (A womens), IllanaKloss (pro), Amy..... don't know her last name (former # ONE NorCal A's), and a few other's like once or so.
    They ALL have more powerful and penetrating forehands than backhands. They all seem more consistent and reliable returning off the backhand side.
    Given an important point, I'd go to their backhands, as I have a better chance of getting to the NEXT shot, rather than losing outright.
    Now if you ARE or know girls with stronger backhands, then your experience is also REAL.
    BUT.... I specifically named a few of the better women's players I've played with, and ALL have more forcing forehands.
     
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