Having some photography trouble....

Discussion in 'Odds & Ends' started by Mansewerz, Jan 13, 2011.

  1. Mansewerz

    Mansewerz Legend

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2007
    Messages:
    9,164
    Location:
    Caught in No Man's Land
    So I recently bought a Canon Rebel XS (refurbished directly from Canon).

    Here's the issue. When I try to take pictures at fast shutter speeds, they turn out way dark. I think my room is pretty lowly light, but I don't think it's that bad. But with the flash, it's perfectly fine. Only problem is, flash only works up to 1/200 sec.


    Any clues as to why this is happening and how I can get brighter pictures?
     
    #1
  2. firefox

    firefox Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2007
    Messages:
    484
    Location:
    Paris, France
    open up the aperture and/or increase the sensitivity setting. you're not getting enough light onto the sensor.
     
    #2
  3. Mansewerz

    Mansewerz Legend

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2007
    Messages:
    9,164
    Location:
    Caught in No Man's Land
    I see. I though the camera should automatically balance it out when in Shutter priority mode?
     
    #3
  4. dufferok

    dufferok Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2004
    Messages:
    136
    When in shutter mode, your camera will auto set the aperture. However, you are limited to the speed of your lens. If the lowest aperture your lens can go is 4.5, then you will be limited on how high of a shutter speed you can select and still have enough light (not using a flash). To take indoor shots with no flash and faster shutter speeds than 1/120, you really need a fast lens. I suggest the Tamron 17-50/2.8 zoom or you could go with a prime 50/1.4 or 35/1.4.

    Or you could purchase an external flash that has the capability of high speed sync. This will allow you to use higher shutter speeds with a flash.

    Finally, don't forget about your ISO setting. Try this, put your camera in shutter mode. Set your shutter speed to 200. Set your ISO to 200. Snap a pic. Now change the ISO to 800, snap the same pic. See the difference? Higher ISO values makes your camera more sensitive to light, therefore brightening the picture but also adding in more noise.

    Hope that helps.
     
    #4
  5. SuperFly

    SuperFly Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2009
    Messages:
    772
    1. Go into Auto Mode so it's as easy as possible for you to shoot.
    2. Lower the ISO (I shoot film, but I think around 60-125 should be fine for regular shooting. Raise the ISO higher if you're shooting action and lower if you're going for long-exposure stuff.)
    3. Open up the aperture (I'm not sure how to do that, I have a convenient ring on my lenses to do that for me. Check the manual or google it.)
    4. Try using a different lens if these don't work.
    5. Give your camera to me so I can keep it and stop waiting for film to develop take a look at it.
     
    #5
  6. junbumkim

    junbumkim Professional

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2006
    Messages:
    1,125
    You want higher ISO setting.

    ISO is a number that shows how sensitive the film is to light. Higher ISO means more sensitivity to the light, hence used in low light setting or when more exposure is necessary.

    Low iso means less sensitivity. Recommend in really bright condition (ie daylight)

    100~300 is considered fairly low. And above 800 is high, this is just my guideline.

    Not sure if you know already but, you want to study the exposure and relationships among aperture, shutter speed, and iso. :)
     
    #6
  7. albino smurf

    albino smurf Professional

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2008
    Messages:
    961
    Location:
    In a cloud of yellow fuzz
    when you run into these kinds of questions about exposure a good tool to use is the auto mode. pay attention to those settings then duplicate in manual mode and tweak from there paying attention to the results.
     
    #7
  8. Mansewerz

    Mansewerz Legend

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2007
    Messages:
    9,164
    Location:
    Caught in No Man's Land
    Great, thanks guys. I was messing around with some fast shutter speeds (1/4000 at some points), and I guess my kit lens just couldn't get it done in the lowish lighting of my room.
     
    #8
  9. SlapShot

    SlapShot Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2006
    Messages:
    2,423
    Location:
    Minneapolis, MN
    If you want to use good shutter speeds in low light using available light, as mentioned, you'll need to use higher ISO and/or a lens with a larger aperture. A good value Canon lens to try would be the 50/1.8 prime - somewhere around $100, and a large available aperture to use.
     
    #9
  10. Mansewerz

    Mansewerz Legend

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2007
    Messages:
    9,164
    Location:
    Caught in No Man's Land
    Thanks for the suggestion. The next lens i'm looking to buy will be a telephoto/sports lens so that I can shoot good action shots, but i'll look at that one after. Limited funds :(
     
    #10
  11. onehandbh

    onehandbh Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2005
    Messages:
    3,164
    One thing to note, though is that opening up your aperture (lower number)
    also decreases your depth of field, or the width of the scene that will be
    in focus. For example, if you set aperture to f/1.4 and compare it to f/16,
    almost everything will be in focus at f/16 and very little will be in focus
    at f/1.4 -- just a thin slice. You can adjust/manipulate these to choose the
    kind of shot you want. Do you want the background to be blurred?
    Generally for wider shots, I like to have more things in focus and up the
    ISO (light sensitivity) instead of just opening up the aperture.
     
    #11
  12. Mansewerz

    Mansewerz Legend

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2007
    Messages:
    9,164
    Location:
    Caught in No Man's Land
    Ah I see. My teacher mentioned depth of field on aperture, but I couldn't remember which way it worked. So wider aperture=shorter depth of field?

    Also, any suggestions for what to photograph? I'm in winter in Illinois at night, waiting on something to do. I want to go downtown to a nearby city and take photographs, but it's a bit of a drive. That said, SLRs are way more fun than point and shoot
     
    #12

Share This Page