Hawaiian grip take off forehand vid

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by Broly4, Apr 13, 2013.

  1. Broly4

    Broly4 Rookie

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    This a short video in which I hit some Fh, I have a full Western grip, but my index is at bevel 6 actually, would you say I hit Hawaiian?

    I know my momentum goes up when hitting (1st fh), but I wasn´t completely aware I was indeed taking off a little bit.

    http://vimeo.com/63928324
    password is Borg

    cheers
     
    #1
  2. 2ManyAces

    2ManyAces Rookie

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    It does look like hawaiian. Maybe just not as far over as the normal hawaiian.
     
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  3. WildVolley

    WildVolley Legend

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    I say Hawaiian.

    A rare grip these days among the pros. Even Djokovic's western tends to shift the index knuckle towards semi sometimes.
     
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  4. GoaLaSSo

    GoaLaSSo Semi-Pro

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    The way you swing looks fairly western to me, but I can see it also being a bit closer to Hawaiian
     
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  5. Lukhas

    Lukhas Legend

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    It's a bit short to make conclusions though. Personally, I already had problems switching from eastern to SW hybrid with E (knuckle on SW, palm on E), can't hit a forehand with SW, so Hawaiian... :lol: Although that same SW grip, when reversed, is awesome for OHBH.
     
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  6. Broly4

    Broly4 Rookie

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    I'll post more videos, It must be Hawaiian, not extreme as you've said, but full Western seems "too Eastern " for me (as crazy as it sounds).

    It's a grip that allows me to be really aggressive, most topspin-friendly grip, the main con I find, is the big grip change I have to face when hitting after a backhand, or even the serve (wish I had a one handed!). It's also weaker for flat hitting.

    With the popularity of poly maybe some pros will be using it in the future...
     
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  7. Lukhas

    Lukhas Legend

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    Nah, because it's harder for short balls, they don't like to have a grip for everything.

    Maybe not "more" videos, but "longer" videos would be cool.
     
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  8. barringer97

    barringer97 Rookie

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    That's a gnarly grip.
     
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  9. mightyrick

    mightyrick Hall of Fame

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    No. Pros will not be using this grip. Put simply, it isn't a versatile grip. Nearly impossible to take a low ball with. Nearly impossible to flatten out the ball. The professionals have clearly settled on variations of semi-western as being the most versatile and most beneficial.

    No offense, but I'm really not sure why anyone would elect to use a Hawaiian grip. You can be aggressive and have everything you want with a semi-western or even a western.
     
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  10. Broly4

    Broly4 Rookie

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    I agree with you, but take into account that:

    Forehand grips are going western over the years.

    Players are bigger now, but the average atp pro grip size is one size smaller today than 10 years ago.

    Slower courts-higher bounce.

    More advanced polys.

    These facts increase the possibility of success of Hawaiian grip in the future, I don´t think it'll become more popular than other grips, but I do believe that will gain some popularity. It's an extreme grip, one of its beauties is that its rare.
     
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  11. Broly4

    Broly4 Rookie

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    Lukhas I´ll post longer videos, match play, so we´ll see If I can solve some of the flaws this grip has, besides all the flaws I already have :)

    I think I deal well with short balls, flat ones are harder, and shank more often than others at my level, spin window becomes paramount with this grip.
     
    #11
  12. BevelDevil

    BevelDevil Hall of Fame

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    There might be an issue with injuries at the pro level with Hawaiian-like grips. Berasetegui and I think Nishikori had wrist problems because of it.
     
    #12
  13. NLBwell

    NLBwell Legend

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    Hard to tell from the video. Guessing from thumb position, I'd say not too far from Western. Definitely a tight hammer grip.
     
    #13
  14. Broly4

    Broly4 Rookie

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    BD: I find some discomfort when playing with 4 3/8 or bigger, Berasategui retired from some leg injury I recall, but man what a forehand, In Spain he was called "Derechategui" (derecha=forehand).

    NLB yeah I think it´s not a full Hawaiian, I would find hard to hit forehand and backhand with the same racket face (a la Berasategui) Should I call this Alaskan grip? I'll post a closer picture, but I thought it might be interesting to show it in action.
     
    #14
  15. Broly4

    Broly4 Rookie

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    By the way, thank you all for your input!
     
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  16. Muppet

    Muppet Hall of Fame

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    Is a Hawaiian grip the same as a continental grip, but using the opposite face of the racquet?
     
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