Help me with a 2HBH variation.

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by Zachol82, Aug 28, 2010.

  1. Zachol82

    Zachol82 Professional

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    I used to have a 1hbh but switched to a 2hbh a while back. I now have a 2hbh where both my arms are straightened during the take back.

    I have seen other people with different 2hbh than my own. More specifically, I'm talking about the 2hbh where both arms are bent A LOT on the take back. It looks kind of funky but seems to be very effective. I have played about 5 players throughout my tennis career that uses a 2hbh that I have described and they are all very consistent on the backhand side, and by consistent I mean they only hit maybe 1 ball out of every 15.

    Now, I know that their consistency probably involves a lot of other factors as well. However, I am still interested in learning this variation of the 2hbh. All I'm asking here is maybe several videos of players or even pros that use the aforementioned 2hbh.

    Any other inputs appreciated!
     
    #1
  2. Dechizen

    Dechizen Banned

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    You have got it all wrong.The arms are usually bent on the take back.There are a few players who keep it straight on the take back( I don't recommend it) such as Hewit http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EcRuybGd72Q
    but most bend the arm.In my opinion Nalbandian, Safin, and Kei Nishikori have the best backhands on tour, go check their backhands on YouTube.
     
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  3. papa

    papa Hall of Fame

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    Do you mean "consistent" or "inconsistent" - hopefully the latter.

    Anyway, there are several variations of the arms on the 2HBH backswing - straight, bent, one of each. Really doesn't matter that much.
     
    #3
  4. BevelDevil

    BevelDevil Hall of Fame

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    It makes sense to use straight/straight coming from a 1hbh. Agassi is one, and he said his bh was more of a right-handed shot.

    Make sure your bottom hand is in a continental grip. Also, keep in mind A closed stance may come a little more natural with this setup.


    Are there any particular problems you're having with your bh?
     
    #4
  5. Zachol82

    Zachol82 Professional

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    Yes, actually. I have trouble with hitting high balls on my backhand side. I know that the best way to resolve this issue is either take a step forward and hitting it right after it bounces OR take a step back and just let it drop lower.

    However, if there IS a way to more effectively hit a high ball with a 2hbh then please do share.

    Another problem I have with my 2hbh is that sometimes I wont swing both my arms as an entire unit and that can be a problem.

    It seems like people with a bent 2hbh has better "pop" on their shots just because their bent arm/wrist kind of snap the racquet onto the ball. I sometimes feel as if my 2hbh has no "snap" and it's just a "push" feeling as oppose to a "smack."
     
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  6. BevelDevil

    BevelDevil Hall of Fame

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    This is a common problem. Do a search for "high backhand" and ingnore the threads about 1hbhs.



    I know exactly what you're saying.

    I believe you are not "rolling your wrists" enough*-- i.e., you need to supinate your dominant forearm and pronate your non-dominant forearm as you swing forward. If you are right handed, this means the your hands should be rotating the racket grip clockwise from backswing to contact.

    Take a few 1hbh swings, and you should be reminded how the palm of the dominant hand turns outward on the swing. It is essential to accelerating the racket. Same idea applies on your 2hbh.

    Also keep in mind that the dominant arm should bend right after contact. This is indicative of a full racket/wrist turn.


    Here's Safin turning over his wrists at contact

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BnjOGaGm_JA


    Here's Agassi doing the same. Notice how he actually cocks his racket back counter-clockwise on the backswing using a wrist-turning action. This allows him to have a greater clockwise rotation on the forward swing while still using a compact arm motion. From backswing to contact, it looks like his torso rotates about 45 degress, while his racket rotates about 60 degrees.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ql5xVpACt1Y


    Give it a shot and let us know how it goes!


    *Note: When I say "wrist" I really mean forearm, but common usage often refers to this as a "wrist" action.
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2010
    #6

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