Help Me with my volleys!!! (Video)

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by Homey, Sep 23, 2008.

  1. Homey

    Homey Rookie

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    #1
  2. Nellie

    Nellie Hall of Fame

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    The forehand volley motion looks good. My only comment is that you need to bend your knees more to get you racquet handle under the head of the racquet. Ideally, you should be be bending your knees and dropping you rear end so that you are hitting the volley about chest height, especially with balls that slow.

    You also need more knee bend and drop on the backhand side. More importantly, the backhand volley looks like slice shot with way too much swing and too much trying the cut/knife the shot. In my opinion, your contact point is also too close to your body. Try hitting with more of an extended arm, while keeping your wrist, elbow, and shoulder pretty still. The whole volley swing path of the racquet head is about 6 inches. Try hitting this pretty flat and straight, and the slice will come naturally from the downward path of the arm, and not from knifing under the ball.

    Also, I noticed that you are taking your eyes off the ball too early - note that your head never turns to look at the ball until contact, which means you are losing sight of the ball well before it contacts your racquet.

    Also, as you get better, you should try to turn and step into the volley to provide the force for contact. Now, you are pretty much standing there and letting the ball hit your racquet.

    Also, as a practice tip, try making the ball maching going a little faster and higher. It is hard in general to high balls dipping under the net because you will need to hit the ball up and over the net, encouraging you to open the racquet face too much.
     
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2008
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  3. smoothtennis

    smoothtennis Hall of Fame

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    Forehand - Close to net one more step, catch the ball at it's apex, not while it's dropping (as much as possible), and last thing - contact the ball further out in front of your body - that does NOT mean to swing the racket out to that position, but to have it in that position, and put your weight into the volley. Do not swing once ounce more than you are doing currently.

    Backhand - Quit swinging! Look at your forehand vid, and then imitate that on the backhand side. Same foot work and contact points apply on both sides btw.

    All in all - Forehand volley looks decent - foot work and contact point will take you to the next level. Backhand needs to have no more swing that you have on the forehand side. Note - become aware of how much you are bending your elbow - use a straighter arm . Let your body to do the work, not your elbow joint.
     
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  4. roc17355

    roc17355 Rookie

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    I would agree

    ^^^^ I mainly agree with the last post. On the forehand you need to take the ball earlier and more out in front, your letting the ball drop below the net so it is almost impossible to drive the ball through the court. When you let the ball drop below the net, as I do alot, you tens to hit the little pop up volleys which now gives your opponent a short ball and puts you on defense which is exactly the opposite of coming to net. Just be a little more aggresive, take it early and step into the ball. Thats where you will get your "punch" from.
     
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  5. roc17355

    roc17355 Rookie

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    Same on backhand

    Take it early above the net and dont swing at the ball. You could probably move your grip a little farther towards and eastern backhand grip so your racquet face is a little more "square" at impact. IT looks like the racquet face is pointing to much upwards, I know alot of people volley like this to get the backspin on the ball but when you take it below the net like you are all you can do is pop it up either sailing it long, once again giving your opponent the short ball. Keep it loose at net so you can change grips quickly if necessary, get more eastern on the backhand, take it early, step into it and walla. Just my 2 cents.
     
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  6. Homey

    Homey Rookie

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    Straight(er) arm

    So I need to have a straight arm or at least a straighter arm on the backhand side.

    It seems like my arm is bent on the forehand side also? Is that OK???

    Is there any drill or training aid I can use to keep me from chopping at the backhand volley? The motion should be more horizontal and less vertical, is that right??

    Thanks
     
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  7. Spokewench

    Spokewench Semi-Pro

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    Concentrate on keeping your racquet out in front more; do not swing; keep the butt of your racquet down more - do not let it get sideways from your body. If you have to bend your knees more to do that, then get down lower for those low volleys.

    Make sure you are not square to the ball when you hit, i.e. turn some and then step into the volley as you hit; this will give you pace and power versus trying to get that with the dreaded swing
     
    #7
  8. fuzz nation

    fuzz nation Legend

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    If your wrist and arm are too active in your volleys, you can drill yourself by hitting them from back at the "T" while holding the racquet up on the throat. This will make you be more deliberate with your move through the ball as you hit it so that you produce a penetrating shot (Ahoy footwork!). Trying to hit volleys with that grip up on the throat can also be helpful for finding a good contact point - if you go too far out in front of you to hit the ball (toward the net), the racquet can actually slide under the ball and pop it up. Go out and get that volley, just don't go out too far.

    It's okay if you have a little elbow bend as you start a bh volley, but you want to take it out almost straight in time for contact - that extension can actually put a little zip on your volley, but your feet are the reliable engines for your move through the shot.

    When you set for that bh volley and take the racquet to that side, look at the "L" that's formed between the racquet's throat and your forearm. As you take the racquet through that compact movement to the ball for your volley, that "L" needs to stay intact for good mechanics and control on that side. Avoid letting your wrist turn over and allowing the racquet to release like it would in a groundstroke - that's counterproductive up at net.
     
    #8
  9. I didn't read everyone's, so apologies if this has been said. The first 5 or so, your right foot moves behind you as you hit the volley, like you're genuflecting in church.

    I believe textbook volley technique is to stomp forward with the foot on your racquet hand side (right foot for righties, left foot for lefties) as contact the ball. This helps you move forward, cut of the angle and punch away. Don't let the ball come to you, and definitely don't step back, as this foot motion almost does.
     
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  10. roc17355

    roc17355 Rookie

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  11. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    Move your head towards your volleys and not away from it. This will also help you not step backwards with your right foot. You need to be closer to the ball for more control and pop. Also, moving your head towards the ball will also help you get your body at the right height as well (i.e. bend your knees, or get your but.t lower).

    Your eyes are the most important component you have to hit good clean volleys on time. You must get better at reading the ball off the opponents strings to improve your skills. Reading the ball off the opponents strings is paramount for practice and building your anticipation skills is paramount to good volleying. You must develop this skill if you want to be good at volleying.

    Also, stop using your wrist and fingers so much to "move" the ball around. With poor footwork and balls coming at you at different speeds, you are going to flub more volleys than you would like this way.

    Let the ball come in, move your head towards the ball, use your weight transfer to help put punch on the ball. Hit and control your volleys from the upper arm (elbow to shoulder).

    For the backhand? Stop swinging and do the above. Bend your knees, get lower. Is there any way you can get the ball moving with faster pace? Technically, you should be moving in on those balls and crushing them. On some of the balls you let them drop either at the netline or slightly below it. For a slow ball like that, I hope you are not planning on standing there and letting the ball sort of loop to you. Right? Please say you are not going to let that happen in real play.
     
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2008
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  12. klinsi

    klinsi New User

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    Maybe you need this device
    http://www.tennisracketbracket.com/training_videos/Forehand_Volley_Tip.php
     
    #12
  13. junbumkim

    junbumkim Professional

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    I agree with what others say.

    Keep your elbows out in front of your body, not to the side of your body, but IN FRONT. As you move to volley, you just stick your racket out.

    Volleying is intercepting a ball. You are always looking to cut off angles by moving toward the ball and into the ball. In the drill, you are sort of letting the ball come to you and blocking it back, instead you should be stepping INTO the ball.

    Also, bend your knees, keep your back straight, keep your elbow out in front, and move your feet.
     
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  14. Blake0

    Blake0 Hall of Fame

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    Forehand volley: you're bringing your right leg back which makes your momentum go backwards and not having much power on your volley. 80% of your power on volleys come from your legs moving forward or cross over stepping and only 20% from your hands. Try to just bring your left leg forward or try to cross over and hit a volley from their. you'll get more power and the ball will stay lower and not pop up. You also won't have the luxury to use your current volley (mainly because of your footwork) in real match play effectively, most of the shots hit hard will make your volley pop up, giving an easy pass to your opponent.

    Backhand volley: you step forward, and don't bring your leg back like you do on the forehand side. I'm not much of an expert (well im no expert at all :)) but you look like your slicing the ball in the air..thats what i do. You're supposed to cross step or step forward and hit the ball with a short stroke, or short take back, like you do on the forehand side. Try to get your body sideways and hit out in front of you.

    This is what i hear from my coach tell to me or everyone else so 90% of this is from my coach indirectly :). He's been in the top 100 in the world so i trust his views on the volley.
    These are a few tips on the volley which will be helpful.
    1. Learn to split step
    2. Hit the volleys out in front of you
    3. Short backswing, and follow through.
    4. cross over or step forward (keep your body weight moving forward)
    5. 80% of your volley power comes from your legs 20% from your arm.
     
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  15. beckham

    beckham Semi-Pro

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    FOREHAND VOLLEY: Make sure you move in and attack the ball more. You are just standing at the service line, and not moving in enough. With that in mind (coming into net) close your racquet face and "punch"(but dont swing) through the volley.

    BACKHAND VOLLEY: Again, moving in would benefit you, coming into net. When you are hitting the ball you want to "punch" through it. You are slicing it way to much. You racquet arm needs to be at 90-125 degrees with your racqet, and your racquet face should be flatter, more closed. Then moving into and through the ball, you will punch it into the court.
     
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  16. beckham

    beckham Semi-Pro

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    W/ moving in, take the ball higher between the waist and shoulder.
     
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  17. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    An approach from the mental side....
    If you plan to stay in position on a volley, DO NOT go for deep winners and angles. Try to underspin the ball just past the service line, about half way to the baseline. Why? You save the winner, hard sliced angle for when you move INTO the court on ONE putaway shot. You movement forwards provides the extra depth to get the ball close to the baseline.
    As for stroke. It's very good! You try to bounce the ball going for too much depth. Let your body movement forwards provide it.
    Almost EVERY pro volleyer has a much longer backhand stroke than their forehand punch! So does yours. Not a bad thing. I think it's something to do with a slightly unbalanced volley grip, towards the backhand side.
    Note Edberg, Cash, Rafter, and Sampras all use a longer, more forceful backhand swing than their forehand punches. The volley is NOT a balanced grip, as is neither the service grip.
    Now read and try to understand all the other posts.
    Consider MINE is thru experience, not theory or "ideal". I talked to some top 50 pros way back when, and they actually found the time to show me their exact grips, and some whys and why nots.....
    Choose for yourself what you want to embrace and adopt.
     
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  18. EikelBeiter

    EikelBeiter Professional

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    What do you mean with a balanced grip ?
     
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  19. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Balanced grip... a form of continental that hits EQUALLY both forehand and backhand.
    Basically, you could say some weak volleyers have that. Very few GOOD volleyers do, as they always need to swing bigger, longer, stronger, and with more body movement moving in on their BACKHAND volleys.
    Balanced grip... can do both sides, NEITHER side any good.
     
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  20. EikelBeiter

    EikelBeiter Professional

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    I see, well then i'm going to have to disagree with you :)

    Reaction volleys (little time to react) are hit with the same grip. If you have time to spare there can be a little change in the backhand or forehand grip, but its a slight one
     
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  21. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    You may disagree all you want, but only YOU have suggested different grips for each volley! So you are wrong, as most of you are on this forum.
    I didn't say to change grips between fore and back volleys. YOU said I did.
    Try reading again!
    An unbalanced volley grip is held conti with a twist towards forehand. EVERY good pro volleyer uses this grip. It is usually (because of BorisBecker) NOT the serve grip.
    Now please don't tell me I said BorisBecker uses this grip!
     
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  22. EikelBeiter

    EikelBeiter Professional

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    Ok, i'll read it again hold on

    Ok you're saying the volley is not a balanced grip....

    A balanced grip is as you say: a grip that is the same fore a forehand and backhand volley. You said the volley is NOT a balanced grip... so I assume you meant that you need a different grip for both volleys ... but you didn't mean it ? i'm confused
     
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  23. Ballinbob

    Ballinbob Hall of Fame

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    so if I use a continental grip for volleys im doing it wrong?

    I'm so confused lol...
     
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  24. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Some form of continental is the "correct" volley grip. Notice "correct", as that is subject to change as the tennis style changes with the times.
    Conti towards backhand is normally the ONE service grip for all serves.
    Conti towards forehand is the normally ONE volley grip by most pros, which you can see by their short, punch forehand volley and LONG, FREESWING, body moving forwards bachand volleys.
    That means, NOT BALANCED grip! A balanced grip would have you stroking both volleys the same way, effort, and style. THAT IS NOT THE CASE in the world of pro level volleying.
    I'll bet, with the continuation and advancement of topspin power groundies, the soon the volley will evolve towards a new grip and style that favors the topspin approachs and harder hitting.
     
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  25. EikelBeiter

    EikelBeiter Professional

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  26. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Oops, sorry.... you are from Holland, so English maybe not the main language....
    Balanced grip...same stroke both sides, is NOT good, is NOT used by most pros for volleying.
    Unbalanced grip, with a slight twist towards forehand, is the ONE grip used for all volleys and some overheads. Unbalanced is what the pros use, favoring their forehand so they just shortpunch it.
    For their backhands, they need a long, freeswinging slice stroke, full shoulder turn, body moving forwards to get the same pace and depth as their short punch forehand volley grip.....but with MORE underspin.
    WHY? I don't know! It's the same with my volleys, that I do know. Mine evolved from a twohanded volley, so I favored my forehand side. I don't know why most pros decided that a biased forehand volley grip would be the one they employ.
     
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  27. EikelBeiter

    EikelBeiter Professional

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    Yes I am from Holland. But i'd like to think that my english is on a fair level. You were just confusing me a bit with your terminology i wasn't familiar with. But your thoughts about the volley are clear to me now. Not that i agree with it though :) But there's no need to get into that, seems to me that you are pretty convinced that you are right. So let's agree to disagree
     
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  28. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    You may disagree now, but once you see vids of Federer volleying (on this forum, maybe two weeks ago), you'll KNOW that I am correct.
    I watched Edberg, Rafter, and Cash all thru the years.
    I sat and talked to DickStockton and RaulRamerez, and it's conti grip for sure, with a twist towards forehand.
     
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  29. EikelBeiter

    EikelBeiter Professional

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    Well i what I don't agree with is not the grip, I misunderstood you earlier, I think we are on par with the grip. I don't think pro's use the "long, freeswinging slice stroke" for a backhand volley. A volley should be as compact as possible in my opinion. But hey let's not try and hijack this thread and give the guy a few pointers :)
     
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  30. EikelBeiter

    EikelBeiter Professional

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    I think you are dropping your rackethead too much on both volleys. Try to get your wrist firm and don't drop your racket head. Also try and punch the volley more in front of you
     
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  31. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Eikel, open your eyes and watch some vids.
    I am NOT recommending a pro players volley for anyone. Just an observation, not necessarily recommended.
    Look at Feds recent volley vid. His forehand putaway is short, compact, crisp, and little forward body movement compared to his BACKHAND.... long, flowing, much more forceful swing, much more body moving into the court, completely different stroke than his forehand punch.
    But it's ok, you can blindly go on red lights, sit down when your opponent serves, and live the life YOUR way.. :twisted::twisted:
     
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  32. EikelBeiter

    EikelBeiter Professional

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    please don't treat me like an idiot. I know a little something about tennis
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eBolZQWnsaU&feature=channel_page
    There thats me volleying, now let's see your volley, like to see your long backswing
     
    #32
  33. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    I don't care how YOU volley, and you don't care how I volley. That is not the point. All coach's would want us to balance our grips on volleys too, and they don't know what going on in the PRO events, therefore their students will never achieve PRO level.
    Forget what YOU do. LOOK at vids of what the PROS do. EVERY good volleying pro uses longer, more turned, body moving more forward on their backhand volleys. For a reflex volley, they employ more underspin and less pace than the forehand volley.
    Say what you want about yourself, but your volleys are NOT the same as a pro player's volleys.
     
    #33
  34. EikelBeiter

    EikelBeiter Professional

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    Of course every pro uses more body turn on his or her backhand volley, that might have something to do with the fact that your shoulder has to turn to be able to hit a backhand volley in the first place. But you are saying you need a long backswing to hit a decent backhand volley, which is completely nonsence.

    And I never implied i have a pro volley. I don't infact, i'm working on my volleys. Just liked to show you that i do know something about tennis and that i don't like to be treated as an idiot.

    why do you have push your opinion as a fact on every topic that you touch?
     
    #34
  35. J011yroger

    J011yroger G.O.A.T.

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    Nice video, love the angle.

    Those courts look super fast. How do they play?

    J
     
    #35
  36. EikelBeiter

    EikelBeiter Professional

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    They are pretty fast carpet courts. They play very nice, soft on the joints and they react good to spin balls. Love to play there
     
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  37. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Eiks....
    Once again, I'm dealing with someone who does NOT understand what he reads...that someone being you.
    I did NOT say anything about longer or bigger backswing. I mentioned a freeswing forward, not anything to do with the backswing.
    Please try to understand what you read before you post.
    Your comprehension of the english language is just plain BAD.....
     
    #37
  38. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Eiks...
    Look at your own video...
    EVERY forehand is a short punch volley, less than 3' mostly.
    EVERY backhand volley is much longer stroked, up to what appears to be maybe 5' in foreward swingpath.
    Is it that hard to see?
    You are supposed to be a 4.5 or better player. Please look at your own video of YOU hitting volleys!
     
    #38
  39. EikelBeiter

    EikelBeiter Professional

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    Anyway I had enough of your insults, i'm done with you.
     
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  40. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Sorry Eiks....
    NOWHERE in my posts do I mention a longer backswing on the backhand volley.
    Everywhere I mention a longer forward swing, just like YOU use.
    Are you blind? Look at your own video! Look at the length of swing differences!
    Do not look at backswing, because nobody mentioned it.
     
    #40
  41. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Eiks... read your post #34 !!
    You are soooo wrong.
    Only you have mentioned backswing.
     
    #41
  42. J011yroger

    J011yroger G.O.A.T.

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    Next time, I am going to take vids of my volleys from the same angle you used, you can see what is going on so much better than from the angle I used.

    This is just a little half court warmup, I don't have much volley stuff on video.

    http://vimeo.com/3324860

    J
     
    #42
  43. EikelBeiter

    EikelBeiter Professional

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    It says you are hitting halfcourt to warm up the balls :) I always hit halfcourt to warm myself up :D From that angle it is hard to see what is going on indeed.

    Those courts look uber fast. Are they?
     
    #43
  44. BullDogTennis

    BullDogTennis Hall of Fame

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    WAY WAY WAY to much swing on the backhand volley. think of catching the ball, not hitting it. if your moving forward and try to swing that much at it its gonna go out 90% of the time.
     
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  45. J011yroger

    J011yroger G.O.A.T.

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    I left the balls in the trunk of my car and it was very cold, so they didn't bounce at all. So we hit half court for 10 minutes until the balls warmed up and bounced normally.

    I played on them 2 winters ago when they were new, and they were very very nice medium speed, with nice grit to them. Now they are worn out, and I think the machine they use to clean the courts leaves some kind of slight soap residue that fills in the grit even more over time, so now they are SUPER fast.

    J
     
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  46. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Homey...
    You are trying to volley really slowly hit balls. For that, you have to step in more, stroke towards the target, get more sideways. Don't just chop at the ball, that stroke is for fast moving balls by players with good timing.
    Biggest problem is forehand. You seem to want to get rid of the ball ASAP, when you should caress it towards your target with underspin, but not chopping slice.
    Same with your backhand volley, but that stroke is more OK, as it's longer and smoother.
    But arcing slow balls, always move your body towards your target. When you play, you'll hardle get anything like that, unless you play 2.5 levels. Fast moving balls, you shorten up the stroke, stay forwards, but be FIRM and try to caress the volley as long a time as you possibly can. Don't "BOUNCE" the ball off your racket like your afraid of guiding it.
     
    #46
  47. Rickson

    Rickson G.O.A.T.

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    You're stepping backwards on your fh volleys when you should be stepping forward with your left foot. On your bh volleys, you should implement more shoulder turn and get that right foot in front of you instead of that half step you're doing. The bh volley becomes much more effective with your right foot solidly in front of you.
     
    #47
  48. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    Even on reactionary volleys it does not mean a player is waiting in an exact continental grip. They could have some of their hand or a slight alteration in the grip.
     
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  49. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    For those half-courts volleys you need to hit the ball with your elbow closer to the body for racquet head control. Your arm should be mainly fixed and you should be swinging mainly from the shoulder.

    You were not bending your knees at all which caused you to hit the ball swinging from your lower arm and wrist.

    On low balls you just dropped your racquet head and not your butt to get those balls. On one of the wide balls to your backhand side, you failed to use a step-out and instead you crossed over and sent your momentum to the side fence which hurt your ability to get back into position.

    Step out with your right foot for forehand volleys and your left foot for your backahnd volleys first!

    Watch this an start it at :56 which covers the footwork part of the volley.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Obz6eCpm_Bw&feature=related
     
    #49
  50. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    11,885
    LeeD, this is not a true statement. As a player develops and practiced good fundamental strokes, personal preferences and discoveries will influence what a player will gravitate towards. You cant say if a player doesnt do what a pro is doing they will never get to the pro level.

    Besides? What pro are you talking about? Conners? Lendl? Agassi? Federer? Haas? Guga? Blake?

    Each of these pros hit a forehand but they have their own unique style, grips, idiosyncrasies and so on. A pro that waits in a backhand grip for a return of serve may think everyone should wait while the other pro prefers to wait in a forehand grip.

    Their is many more variables that go into a person making it to the pros besides genes!

    And as far as coaches wanting their students balancing their grip for the volleys, why the hell not?

    The Continental grip is the grip for volleys. A player will eventually alter their grip to put their hand in a more comfortable/stronger position for them. This is an individual thing and it sort of falls into a coached thing. The main point is to get them into the dominate volley grip and that is the Continental.

    I dont know why you say things like the statement you made above.

    You cant just look at the pros. You have to remember that pros have hours upon hours put into developing their strokes and styles. Players learning the game do not have this time and need to focus on the fundamentals to help them improve to a certain level. I certainly am never going to go pro because I a too old. However, I am smart enough to know that not everything a pro does is beneficial for my game.

    First off, the pro game is much different and more precise than my normal club level game. It just is and knowing that there are certain things I can take from a pros game and certain things I really cant take.
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2009
    #50

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