hips got me...anyone else

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by markwillplay, May 25, 2010.

  1. markwillplay

    markwillplay Professional

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    Well, my long strange trip has come to an end.. or beginning depending on how you view it. I was diagnosed with Femoral acetabular impingement syndrome 8 months ago and underwent arthroscopic surgery to get out some chips and clean it up (as best we could). Rehab was hard but I am 40 and in pretty much the best shape of my life so I was able to bounce back quickly. Unfotunately, the hip socket cartilage (for lack of better term) was about 60% gone and I was told that it probably would not buy me much time. They did not know for sure how bad it was until they got in there with the scope. My sitchuation is really genetic (anatomy issue) and now i realize that I have pretty much been on a time table my whole life (almost glad I did not know). Just the way it is. Both hips are the same but the right one was worse becasue I am right handed and probably put a lot more stress on that one over the last 25 years of pretty intense athletic training and participation. The last 4 years of pretty high level competitive tennis on hardcourt probably sent me over the edge without knowing it (ain't no probably to it)...."you don't know until you can't go". So I am having the right one replaced and the left will probably soon be to follow because I now feel same symptoms in it. By the way, I have been to three different orthos and the last one is a top "hip" guy who knows the latest stuff (very encouraging). Let me tell you to be wise as to what ortho you go to. things in hip world are changing rapidly and you need to go to someone who specializes in them if you are having trouble..OK, that is the advertizement..

    Anyway, is there anyone else out there who has undergone hip replacement and come back to playing at a "farily" competitive level? I talked to a teaching pro yesterday who has had both done and probably still plays 4.5 but let's face it..he could beat me on skates. I am just curious if anyone else who was in great shape otherwise has had a recent hip replacement and come back to play singles. I know doubles is possible because there are tons of people with replacements doing that. Life is life, I would just love to hear from anyone who has experience with this proceedure.
     
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  2. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    As an old fart, I know quite a few (over 5) guys who had hip replacement surgery.
    Every single one could do the sport almost as well as before, within 3 years. However, EVERY single one of them gave up the sport within 4 years, as recovery becomes the problem (takes longer), more pain, and more OTHER physical problems stem from the hip replacement. Alu, titanium, nylon, or a mix of.
     
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  3. markwillplay

    markwillplay Professional

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    I am hoping that my age now will help. I guess I will see. Thankfully, I love to weight train and do other types of exercise besides running. I hope to be able to play on clay and maybe even doubles only. The only other person I know who had both done in his 40's is still playing and competes at a high level, but he is also a pro so that would stand to reason. I have not heard anyone say they wish they would have waited. And if they feel like I do right now after having played some today and a couple of days ago (stubborn) I understand why. Wish me luck.
     
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  4. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    I WISH YOU ALL THE GOOD LUCK !!!
    OTOH, very few 40ish pros, any sport, except for teachers, coaches, and managers. Playing pros....NONE.
     
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  5. markwillplay

    markwillplay Professional

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    well he is a teaching pro, not a pro that is on the tour...yikes... He can play at a 4.5 level in tournaments and win but he has been playing all his life. If I could play singles ata 3.5 level and compete I know I would enjoy it. I wsa playing at 4.0 level and in the "hunt" in tournaments and even won one. We'll se down the road I guess. As muchas I hope to be able ot play, I have learned that there are more important things for sure....the hard way.
     
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  6. Bigtime

    Bigtime Rookie

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    My father had one side replaced (appx 5-7 yrs ago @ appx. age 70), and although he never was into sports (unless you count fishing) he has always been extremely active (kind of hyper-active). He was able to do just about everything he used to except for without the pain after his replacement. During his recovery/rehab, the biggest challenge for him was not resuming his fast paced, heavy working activities too quickly.

    Hopefully, since you are only 40ish, you should be able to still enjoy/compete long after your replacement(s). Especially since you love the weight training you should be able to rehab quickly AND properly.
     
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  7. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    The guys I referred to were top amateur level windsurfers, tennis players, skiers, and bicycle racers. All competed at their levels.
    Sadly, all gave up after the 5th thru 7th years after hip replacement.
     
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  8. waves2ya

    waves2ya Rookie

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    Mark - is there anything the tennis community can learn from your passage; was there a point, or a sign (pain, presentation or physical debility) that you ignored that would have avoided this outcome...?

    Or was outcome largely pre-determined by genetics/fate...?

    Thanks in advance - and your are right when you say "I have learned that there are more important things"; you'll recover enough to re-prioritize and move on with your life. Tennis may still be a part of it - you never know...
     
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  9. markwillplay

    markwillplay Professional

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    well nt really. Genetics. I have an impingement in both hips that has been there since birth. It hust takes a while for it to wear the joint down. I can remember feeling "not very flexable" since I was in my teens. Now funny thing is, I was the fastest person on my highschool football team (not exagerating) and I always loved to run. I do remember getting hit on my right side during my junior year of football and I swear I believe that did not help. I think it got me out of line even more. Back then I just played through it. I used to run a lot along with lifting weights and I had lowback trouble (on right side). This was actualy my hip disguised as back issues. Both hips are pretty much the same but my right one really just got worse and worse. As I rehabbed from my arthroscopic surgery (an attempt to relieve impingement) I was doing all sorts of stretching exercises for both hips....this has aggrivated my left one so it is probably only a matter of time before it goes. It is still much better off than the right and I guess that is becasue I am right handed and let me tell you that playing tennis on a hard court at a 4.5 level is the WORST thing you can do. If I had never gotten back into tennis, I would probably have several more years before it got to the point it is now. I do suppose I could have had them both scoped when I was in my 20's if I had known what I know now, but, the technology was not even around then. This last doc is an expert and he says it was just a matter of time. I have been very encouraged after talking to a couple of people that have had it done. No, they don't run on pavbement for fun, but they do play tennis and they said that they wished they would have done it earlier. We'll see. People see me play now and don't think there is anythinig wrong with me becaue I am very athletic and am stell very fast...but they don't feel that chronic acke that just seems tp never go away.

    I will let ya'll know how I do and tell you everything I can after I have it done and am back working out. Every time I don't fgeel much pain, I have second thoughts, every time I do I can't wait. Getting old suchs (ha ha ha).
     
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  10. jmhs

    jmhs Rookie

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    Mark, can you describe more of the the genetics part...did it involve slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE)? If so, do you know your grade of slippage? Many of the top hip researchers say this is a ticket for the femoral acetabular impingement you describe. I ask because my family has a mild history of this.

    Good luck to you.
     
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  11. markwillplay

    markwillplay Professional

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    My doc says that my hip "socket" is very shallow and underdeveloped form birth...also, my femoral head is underdeveloped so I have a two pronged problem. Socket too shallow and flat and femoral head not big and round enough....so, my femor ..."stick" let's call it (looks really big on x-ray)..has been banging against my labrum (tearing it to peaces over the years). Also, since my femoral head is not round and smooth, it has been tearing at my catilage inside the socket (could not see until they got in there with the scope..but I could damn sure feel it). So I have impingement on both sides and from both the femoral head developing large bulge (which was shaved a bit during arthroscopic surgery) and also from an overhang from my socket. I hope that makes sense. the left one was not as bad but has started really bothering me now probably due to all the rehab exercises I was doing.
     
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  12. jrod

    jrod Hall of Fame

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    I play a guy who used to be a 5.0 prior to his hip replacement surgery. He's probably a 4.5 now, primarily due to his reduced mobility. If he can set up for the ball, it's probably one of the heaviest balls I see among the folks I play. He's an independent teaching pro.

    I know a couple of other guys that play 4.0-4.5 level who have had one hip replaced. One guy really didn't move that well but the other guy i had no idea he had it done. I think much of what you can do after the surgery/rehab depends on a couple of things; namely how hard you work at returning to the game and whether you can make the proper adjustments to your game style once your do return.
     
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  13. jmhs

    jmhs Rookie

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    Wow. This has to be good news for Mark. I thought hip replacement(s) meant doubles only. I thought that singles would wear out the replacement(s) too quickly. I heard that was why they don't like to do them before the age of 60.
     
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  14. jrod

    jrod Hall of Fame

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    I asked the 4.5 pro I hit with about this. He indicated his replacement was extra-duty because of his job. I have no idea whether or not this statement is credible but I suspect the technology has improved substantially. I do know that they prefer to delay the replacement for as long as possible. I also am aware that the artificial joints don't last forever and that if you are not careful, you can wear it out more quickly by placing added stress on the joint. My sense is the guy I know has no real options for other income sources. He doesn't really compete anymore though (just teaches).
     
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  15. markwillplay

    markwillplay Professional

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    Not so now. They have come a long way. If you use metal on metal, there are no real parts to wear out. When they used metal on plastic, eventually the plastic gives way. They still use that on older folks who are much less active I think. I was told by a hip specialist that the metal on metal they are using for people (probably like the guy you know) will not "wear out". There can be complications weith any replacement but the "they only last for so long" theary is now out of date. Hip replacement and surgery is changeing at a very fast rate...I mean literally a few years ago it was not near as good. they used to hold you off because they knew they only lasted for so long. Now, the most respecte ortho hip specialists do not recommend waiting...in fact, waiting too long can actually be detremental. Trust me, I have been researching it and talking about it for the last year like a man possessed. I am just glad I found a hip specialist near me who is one of the top guys...He teaches at Duke and does seminars all over the world on hips and the new techniques. People come from 5 states over to him. I will let you know how it goes though. I believe we should let each other know about things like this so that if anyone has to go through it later, they are as informed as possible.

    Hey, I think it sucks..and as a matter of fact, I played today on the clay and played OK...but when you feel that ache come on that stays with you, you know it is time. f it was life and death, I could hold off..but it is quality of life and constant pain can start to bring you down after a while. Wouldn't it be great if there were drugs that would just numb the pain without eating a hole in your stomach. Let me tell you this, I can survive and thrive taking Ibuprofin every day...but to all that do that...it is fools Gold. I have stopped taking all nsaids over a month ago and will live with the pain until replacement. If you have ever had stomach ulcers, you know what I mean. YOu can't take that stuff every day forever and if you are, it will get you in the long run.
     
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  16. jmhs

    jmhs Rookie

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    Sounds to me that you'll surely be back in the tennis competition business. That's great. You'll find the a competitive level that works.

    I've heard people say that the pain clearly told them when it was time to do the replacement(s). Appears as if you're crossed that bridge.

    All the best. Keep us posted.
     
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  17. slewisoh

    slewisoh Semi-Pro

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    Other than having an excellent surgeon, I think the most important factor to your return to tennis will be your willingness to adapt. I think it's the rare individual that comes through a significant surgery without experiencing a fundamental change of some type.

    Rather than think about getting back to where you were before surgery, try to think about the wonderful opportunity you will have to play pain free tennis. I found that when I accepted my body's physical limitations, I developed skills in other areas of my game.

    I had wrist surgery on my dominant side at age 41, and at 44 am playing joyfully, without meds, and with a broader skill set. Who needs an ulnar head anyway? Spare part, as it turns out. :)

    Best of luck to you!
     
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  18. markwillplay

    markwillplay Professional

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    slewisoh...you are sooooo right. I have no doubt that this will change my life, cetainly tennis. I just hope to be able to come back and enjoy the game without pain. The days of me running around and chasing everything down and winning with athleticism are over. No problem, that probably kept me from working on some things I needed to anyway (ha ha). Really, I just want to be able to go out there and have fun. I really like the game and was stoked when I got back into it a few years ago. Thanks for the kind words.
     
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  19. ab70

    ab70 New User

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    Please, kep us posted... I was diagnosed with possible labral tears in both hips... right is also worth than left and KI decided to drag it as I can manage pain reasonable well, coach my kids and get some doubles 2x week...
    Hopefully, things will go smoothly for you and you will get back to the court.
     
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  20. jmhs

    jmhs Rookie

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    Labral tears can be serious (require surgery) and not so serious:

    1. A couple of studies have concluded that 94% of cadavers had labral tears. I doubt many in that bunch were tennis players!

    2. Major work with a great PT can, in some cases, get people with labral tears back on the court without surgery (my 48-year old dad is an example of that).

    2. The best hip docs (e.g., Phillipon in CO...did Alex Rodriguez's labral tear) can't figure out why some people can do okay w/tears and others need surgery. They are studying it. My guess is that hip/groin area pain is very complex to diagnose...so many possibilities...sports hernia, etc.

    Good luck.
     
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  21. markwillplay

    markwillplay Professional

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    yea, I would go by the level of pain. When I had my hip scoped my labrum was about decentagtrated...not torn but damn near gone and I had really been living with it and very extremenly active for years and years probably. My first doc thought I had a labrum tear and that that was my problem. Turned out to be the least of them (ha ha). REaly, I think you should do what you want to do as long as you are not having to use drugs all the time to be able to do it.Some people can have labrum tears and go on and on...others have a bone structure wehre a tear really does damage over time....just depends. I guess pain is a good guide.
     
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  22. markwillplay

    markwillplay Professional

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    well, had my pre-op visit today. Doc says that I should be able to play again...he seemes confident that I will be much better off even playing becasue of the lack of pain. I am nervous but it was good to hear that from him. I am really hoping that the left one is a few years away. He says we need to see how the right one does and then get a read on the left. He says that getting my normal gate back may actually help my left one as I have probably been favoring my right side since my scop surgery 6 months ago. We'll see. I go on vacation next week and when I get back...boom. You folks keep me in your thoughts and prayers.
     
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  23. slewisoh

    slewisoh Semi-Pro

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    Good luck with your surgery and please keep in touch. At one point in my recovery from wrist surgery, I need to get a good whine out of my system - definitely helped to have people to rant to.
     
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  24. MAX PLY

    MAX PLY Hall of Fame

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    Sorry I have not responded before now, I just saw this thread. I turn 50 this year and have played my entire life since age 7, including on my college team (when most racquets came from trees or metals and the dawn of the graphite age was just beginning) and have been ranked (state, region or national) in most age groups along the way. I had a hip problem that began about 6 years ago and ultimately took me out of tournament play. I had a total hip replacement about 18 months ago and am now playing without any problems whatsoever. I started tournament play again this year and frankly am playing better than I did in the couple of years prior to the replacement.

    The surgery is relatively simple. The key is preparation before (i.e., work hard to get in great shape prior to the surgery) and work your butt off after. Doing the physical therapy is key--there are absolutely no shortcuts--it sucks, it hurts but it works. Any tennis at all will take 3-4 months but it really takes almost a full year for the hip flexors to fully heal and strengthen--you will need to listen to your body on that one. My biggest problem was un-learning some bad habits I developed while hitting with the bad hip--harder to un-learn than I ever thought it would be. Good luck.
     
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  25. markwillplay

    markwillplay Professional

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    right on..thanks. I have prepared like no body's business. Have done every squat, hip flexoer exercise...bla bla bal known to man. I had to recover from arthroscopic surgery on this hip 6 months ago so I efinately know the routine. Great to hear that someone out there has been through it and is enjoying playing.
     
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  26. markwillplay

    markwillplay Professional

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    had the surgery Tuesday. Came home Thursday. I hate staying in hospitols and I hate what anestesia does to me....uuggghhh. I am home now though and am doing physical therapy. If I knew that my left hip was fine, I would probably be on top of the world but knowing that I may have to get that one done is like a black cloud over me (damn genetics). Anyway, I will post from time to time on my recovery. I am walking with a walker and crutches..and sometimes one crutch. Each day has been better than the last. For me today was the best and I was able to do all my physical therapy exercises 3 times. My Therapist pretty much wrote what I was to do (I had done them with my scope so no need for out patient visits...I work hard at home). Right hip feels like I had a big charlie horse and am trying to walk on it if that makes sense. But, no arthritic ache really. My head is down now and I will continue to work as hard as I can without overdoing it (which is difficult for me). My incision is only about 4 inches....man the amount of work they do under that is crazy. We'll see how much my preperation helps me over the next few weeks.

    Doc says my left one is a toss up. It was not as bad as my right one as far as pain, but it has the same condition. The 6 months of rehab from the scope had an adverse affect on it and made it start to hurt. He says that some times, the replacement of one can actually help the other and that it can also hurt the otehr (with my condition). Honestly, I am sort of banking ohn having to have them both done and hoping for the best.

    I will post here from time to time as my own therapy (ha ha) but also to inform others. There is not a lot of info out there from people who have actually been through this and come out of it.

    Just for my own benefit, the fellow that pushed me to the operating room told me that his 33 year old nephew had both of his replaced 3 years ago 3 weeks apart by my doctor and that he was doing better than ever.

    We'll see
     
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  27. markwillplay

    markwillplay Professional

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    oh yea, by the way, doc said it was ugly bone on bone all the way...waaaay worn out. That did make me feel a little better to be honest.
     
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  28. Pneumated1

    Pneumated1 Professional

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    Wow! I just got the exact same diagnosis at 41. I have full-blown arthritis in the right hip, and while the left is not as bad, it's guaranteed to follow suit. I feel it there as well. The funny thing is that I've been treating this as a "groin strain" for just over a year, playing tennis moderately and hobbled, until I finally realized that a common "groin strain" should have healed months ago. An orthopedic visit last week revealed the truth. Being an anatomical idiot for the most part, I wasn't even aware that the actual hip joint (socket and femoral ball) join at the side of the pelvis, not the outside/top of the leg at the top of the femur, which is normally referred to as the "hip." So my pain was not a result of a connective injury of the groin tendons but the hip, which is why the injury never went away or got better.

    I have been prescribed 6 weeks of physical therapy. If that doesn't work, the ortho mentioned one of the latest injections, before undergoing reshaping/arthroscopic surgery. Because I'm "young" and my bones are strong, this approach supposedly keeps you competitive athletically, without the concern of the replacement wearing out prematurely. However, he indicated that a complete replacement of one or maybe both hips was almost certain at some point.

    I'm exclusively a singles player and will probably have to go to doubles just to stay in the game, if I can even tolerate that. Tennis is the best sport that I've ever played, and I've played them all. I love it, but it doesn't love me. The irony is that I picked the game up in 04 when my wife bought me tennis racquet for Christmas, a few months after a chiropractor did x-rays of my hips and told me that I had the wear of a 55-60 year old and to stop running immediately. I always just hoped he was wrong:mrgreen:
     
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  29. Joakley

    Joakley New User

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    I have had 2 hip replacements, and it hasn't really stopped me from performing any activities. I still play tennis every week , still cycle , kayak and martial arts. My job consists of walking a mail route of 15 miles 5 days a week with no real issues. I was 48 when I got the first one, it was a poor design and failed so I had to have it revised. The second one went much better and I was walking normally the day after surgery. You have to be stubborn and just get on with it and don't feel sorry for yourself, it's up to you how much and how soon you want to do. They have a new anterior approach that so noninvasive that pain meds aren't even needed. Good luck and if I can answer any questions feel free to ask. Cheers
     
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  30. dman72

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    I fear I'm in the same situation as you guys and just in denial about it. I've always been incredibly inflexible, especially in my hips. I used to nail ever other aspect of the Presidential fitness test, but fail because of flexibility.

    I played a lot of basketball in my 20's and my hip flexors would absolutely kill me after a 3 hour session. I thought it was normal but thinking back it wasn't.

    If I play tennis more than once a week my hips hurt..3 times and they really kill....I started lifting weights heavily in January in an attempt to get in better shape and hopefully strengthen this area of my body (legs overall are too weak compared to upper body), but the right hip is becoming a real problem. I can't squat properly (below parallel) because I simply can't..no flexibility in the hip.

    Everything I read from the 2010 post tells me I'm most likely a carbon copy of the OP. I'm 42.
     
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  31. dr325i

    dr325i Legend

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    42, bad situation in my right hip...
    It's been worsening for the last 2 years.
    Still playing 4-5 times per week, but now taking salt baths at least 3 times per week :(
     
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  32. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Just met a 71 year old, double hip replacement, who plays S/V tennis to end points quickly at the 3.5 level. He has all the shots, but his movement is still suspect. He won't win any spider drills.
     
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  33. comeback

    comeback Professional

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    #33
  34. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Yes, staying fit and trim take it easier on your joints of the feet, ankles, knees, and hips.
    But, I'm 5' 10" and 150. Losing much weight will affect my health, although I should be able to lose 15 lbs pretty easily and stay healthy.
     
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  35. Raul_SJ

    Raul_SJ Professional

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    Yes, I was wondering about that too.

    The guys I know with knee replacements all say that their doctors advised them to play doubles only.

    And so I assumed it must be the same for hip replacements... But maybe hip replacements do not wear out as much as knee replacements, thereby making singles play permissible.
     
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  36. dr325i

    dr325i Legend

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    Ironically, my issues have started AFTER I dropped 25lbs. At 190lbs, I am in best shape of my life, and have been exercising most in my 42 years...

    Also, ironically, my doctor yearly report (sugar, cholesterol, and other crap) has been the worst since I trimmed my diet to eat almost no meat and 85% salad and veggies...

    Will have to go back to my moms medicine: beer, roasted pork, heavy mashed potatoes and a loaf of bread...for every meal...

    I guess, can't go against age
     
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  37. Pneumated1

    Pneumated1 Professional

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    I wasn't aware that my and the OP's condition (femoral acetabular impingement) is the one that Tomic has and the reason for his surgery after the Australian Open this year. I read where his doctor was amazed that he's been able to perform at the level he has for the past ten years, considering that he has probably struggled with it for about a decade. I think Raonic has a similar condition. They're both young, but it'll be interesting to see if it cuts their tennis careers are cut short. I hope not, but the condition predisposes a player for premature destruction of the joint.

    I'm 6'2" and 165-170lbs and fit, so weight is not a contributor to my injury. I went to my first physical therapy session yesterday, and the PT mentioned that my flexibility and range of motion were still excellent, but my right hip was considerably weaker than my left during the exam. That makes sense, as people often commented, even while injured, how well I moved. I could still run down anything, but once I got to a ball in a corner, I'd succumb to the weakness and instability of the joint over the ball.

    Currently, I've gone to spin/cycling, ellipticals, and strength training and am off the court. Today marks 3 weeks since I've been on a court. I played 3 times in 4 days and was noticeably dragging my left leg behind me when I walked on day 4, and that was my stronger side/hip. I'm gonna go through the therapy to hopefully get some strength back and learn how to keep it strong, but I sense that I'd better stay off the court. I'm in pain just walking around.

    I suspect that arthroscopic surgery is in my near future just to try to repair some extensive damage, but I'm preparing myself for eventual replacements. It is what it is, like a poster implied above. You put your head down and deal with it.
     
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  38. Pneumated1

    Pneumated1 Professional

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    It's interesting that most of us in here with documented hip issues are in our 40s. I guess the "recreational" athlete doesn't know there's a problem until the pain and restriction is debilitating. It's a shame we couldn't have seen the warning signs.

    I should clarify that my diagnosis came exclusively from X-Rays and a physical exam. My personal, athletic history, location of pain, X-Rays, and the exam led my orthopedic to a quick and immediate diagnosis. He said he had no doubt, but the problem is that they cannot know how bad it is unless they do an MRI or go in for arthroscopic surgery, which in my case would be preceded by an MRI.

    He could determine from the X-Rays that I have arthritis in the right hip, but now I wonder about the excessive pain on the left side, as well. Both sides of the groin burn and ache, whether I'm active or not. Is that arthritic pain or a result of tearing of the nerves or cartilage? That question is only answered by forking out lots of dough, unfortunately.
     
    #38
  39. comeback

    comeback Professional

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    Interesting, How tall are you? 190 lbs is ok if over 6'3"...I was 5'9" 178 and THOUGHT i was in great shape being a 4.5-5-0 tournament singles player. But my test numbers weren't great..My joints were killing me and DOMS (delayed onset muscle soreness) and inflexibility were becoming a serious problem. After reading several books about cutting out grains which were causing inflamation in my joints, , i was able to take my fitness to another level. My hips healed and now 147lbs with no soreness and I'm stretching further than i ever dreamed. here's some of the info:
    http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=476866
     
    Last edited: Apr 1, 2014
    #39
  40. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    I move much quicker and easier at 145 lbs.
    But, I seem to hit harder more consistently on more kinds of incoming ball when I weigh around 152.
    Up until my 35th birthday, I never weighed more than 132. 5'10".
     
    #40
  41. comeback

    comeback Professional

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    Agreed.... but a question LeeD..You mentioned several times that you had difficulty running..Why is that?
     
    #41
  42. Pneumated1

    Pneumated1 Professional

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    It does all beg the question of whether or not a more holistic approach to treatment and possible healing is out there. Mike Bryan has apparently played with problem for ten years without surgery, but he has millions:

    http://www.forbes.com/sites/robertg...ke-bryan-of-the-bryan-brothers-beat-the-odds/

    Interestingly, he attributes cutting out gluten as a major contributor to his hip wellness and lack of overall joint inflammation.

    But the article also reveals a ton of other players that have had success with arthroscopic surgery and are still playing. It also reveals a few who would have benefited from today's research and knowledge in the field, e.g., Kuerten and Norman.

    It's hard to know what to believe and what plan of action to take.
     
    WillieTriesAgain likes this.
    #42
  43. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Comeback, thanks for asking.
    I seem to have torn a couple of ligaments inside my left ankle in 2007, landing a big jump windsurfing, my foot twisting inside the footstraps so I could look down and see the bottom of my foot, and sailed for about 200' before deciding something wasn't right, slowing down and pulling my foot out, it snapping back hard and painfully into place, before sailing the rest of the way in to the dock.
    I have tried replicating that twisting of the ankle, but no way can my arms and hands produce nearly enough force to show me my entire bottom of the foot.
    Since I have no medical insurance, and was already 58 at the time, I figured, who cares, I can still play tennis at 4.0, windsurf at top expert/advanced, and ride a bike like an old out of shape fart.
    It's been over 7 years since I haven't been able to run. No biggee so far.
    I used to be the rabbit, the fastest short distance runner of anyone anywhere, which is why I played football all 3 years for my high school and played varsity basketball in the spring all 3 years. I graduated high school at 5'5" and some change, around 114 lbs.
     
    #43
  44. comeback

    comeback Professional

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    Wow, what bad luck LeeD and from your athletic backround of basketball and football ,not being 100% must have been pretty depressing..I guess tennis and surfing are decent sports for you now since they don't require having to run all the time..Anyway i'm 63 so we must be close to the same age. I was a college basketball player in New Jersey and it helped me tremendously after taking up tennis at 22. I'm sure it might heve been the same for you.
     
    #44
  45. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    It's actually quite nice having "average" speed, for a 4.0 level tennis player.
    I can't quite cover alley to alley, but come within 2-3'.
    I can now concentrate on my hitting, instead of relying on speed to get one more ball back.
    We gotta live with whatever life gave us as burdens, and getting to play tennis 4 days a week, still windsurf 4-6, is not such a bad life.
    Snowboarding is hard, laying down toeside carving turns, but surfing isn't too bad. My paddling skills are now nil though, not the fault of my ankle.
    Surprinsingly, I can ride a road bike just fine, usually going 35 miles in 2.5 hours, but barely keeping up with a now 44 year old g/f.
     
    #45
  46. comeback

    comeback Professional

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    Agreeed LeeD, not thinking about running after the next ball and just finishing your shot makes so much sense.. i have seen some guys with some movement limitations that can hit semi pro shots or are excellent doubles..But keep livin the life man while you can.
     
    #46
  47. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Thanks, life is good.
    I used to wonder and worry about one of my buds, who had polio as a kid, his left leg 4" shorter than his right.
    We were playing C's together, all very competitive, but he could barely run, and often confounded players better than him with surprising shots.
    Met him about 6 years ago, he now a windsurfer, and we played some tennis, just points, no sets. He hit some outstanding 1hbh limping backhand passing shots, both DTL and CC, when pressed.
     
    #47
  48. Mac33

    Mac33 Semi-Pro

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    Interested what is the best way to prevent this problem.

    Read a few years back of a pro New Zealand squash player who needed both hips replaced,he was late 30's.

    Figure it's the impact of the lunging but not sure.

    Using old shoes reduces significantly the shock resistance,so I'm very careful there. Two to three months and they get replaced.

    Have a friend who won't play tennis on hard courts only on clay mostly or grass.

    Take care.
     
    #48
  49. Braker4

    Braker4 New User

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    I, too, have had hip problems.

    Just a matter of weeks ago, after some fairly extensive internet researching, I finally realized and diagnosed my problems (Hip/Hip Flexor). I think.
    I had felt this before (during a tournament last year) and truly thought it was a glute pull/strain.
    Then, a few weeks ago on the court, I thought it was a groin problem.
    I now believe, that this entire time, it has been a hip problem.

    There must be a much greater load that is put on the right-side hip (for a right-handed player) when playing tennis. So many common and similar stories from other people here!
     
    #49
  50. TennisMD

    TennisMD Semi-Pro

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    So I am 66 ,on 5/12/15 had left hip arthroplasty . Same day surgery in OR 6:30 AM started PT 12 noon ,discharged by 4:30 PM. I was in excellent shape prior to the procedure except of course for the hip, but excellent leg strength I could leg press 400 lbs, that motion never bothered my hip. A lot of controversy on what approach they take but I had anterior approach only 4 inch incision, a spinal for anesthesia and I was up and walking with a cane by 12 or 12:30. Some set backs day 4 post op( I probably did to much walking) so day 5 a lot of pain all inflammation no damage to the joint. The anterior approach allows no major muscles to be cut or damaged so chance for dislocation of your new hip is very very small, also do not lose strength in a big way also allowing quicker recovery. There are some unique side effects to this approach , all published on the Internet , so pick a surgeon who has done this technique for along time, my surgeon has been doing this approach for 10 yrs.
    Now at 2 month point I am walking 2 to 3 miles no pain, doing spinning( have avoided going out doors yet, fall phobia LOL) but hard spinning keeping up my cardio.
    I was told at 3 months, so Aug 12th, I can return to playing. I let all know how that went, but so far so good
     
    #50

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