Hitting high shots

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by raiden031, Sep 7, 2006.

  1. raiden031

    raiden031 Legend

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    What's some advice on hitting shots that bounce about shoulder to face height? Do you crush those with some top spin or hit them nice and smooth to not go out of bounds? Do you swing the racquet with an upward motion as you would a normal bounce, or a more sideways motion?

    I have this problem where if I hit it like a normal forehand, it goes too high and drops out of bounds. If I hit it with more of a sideways motion, it falls into the net. I end up hitting really soft. When I watch the pros, it looks like they are putting these types of balls away every time with ease...I'm not sure if maybe they are bouncing low and I am fooled by the camera.
     
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  2. TylerWeekes

    TylerWeekes New User

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    #2
  3. Narcissist

    Narcissist Semi-Pro

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    I have problems with these too. I have been following advice here to take the racquet back high and just swing at them flat - this has helped a lot. When I get it right people seem to have problems dealing with all the pace :)

    The pros seem to love these high balls.
     
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  4. jackson vile

    jackson vile Legend

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    This or taking them on the rise, one thing to keep in mind here is that your racket can be a limiting factor here.

    If you don't have enough weight in the head or your racket is too headlight you can end up spraying them a lot.

    So you can spin them back as Nadal does, but that is a heck of a lot of work.

    Personally I trying to get them on the rise as they are almost sure winners when hit right, but that can cause errors as well.
     
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  5. Geezer Guy

    Geezer Guy Hall of Fame

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    If you can strike the ball near or inside the service line, hit it flat and drive it into a corner. Treat it like an approach shot.

    If you're taking the ball back near the baseline, let it drop into your strike zone and hit it with topspin like a normal baseline rally shot.
     
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  6. jackson vile

    jackson vile Legend

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    In the last case you mention would that not be allowing yourself to be pushed back, then putting your opponent in position to score?

    As any time I do this when the ball is deep I end up with no room or get pushed out, that is why I push forward (when I spot it) and hit on rise.
     
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  7. Mike Cottrill

    Mike Cottrill Hall of Fame

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    Tyler,
    Thanks for the video. However, in your video you talk about the high ball and backing up or hitting on the rise. I believe we are talking about moving forward and hitting the short ball (after bounce not swinging volley) before it drops allowing the opponent to recover. Hitting the ball at armpit or higher.
    1) How high is too high for a forehand drive?
    2) When to decide to hit a high forehand flat (volley type) or high forehand drive?
    Maybe someone has a video of this type of shot? I saw a good one on the USA highlights a few minutes ago.

    Thanks
    Mike
     
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  8. ubel

    ubel Professional

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    It really is a very tricky shot depending on court positioning. When I watch the pros, if the ball is deep forcing them behind the baseline, most of them try their best to time the ball as best as they can and while jumping up apply as much topspin and forward-drive to the ball as they can (emphasis more on topspin) so as to discourage their opponent from coming in while keeping themself out of a defensive position. If you'll notice Federer, he'll often times use his incredible footwork to prepare for the high-bouncers so that he can take these on the rise at roughly shoulder height and hit a topspin drive. The result: the ball's velocity upward after the bounce forces more topspin into his own topspin stroke when the racquet hits it causing a nasty kick when the ball bounces, which often times throws off his opponent's timing, forcing the unforced error/weak reply.

    However, if it's short, high, it's usually an easy putaway/setup for a winner as they tend to hit these more flat due to clearance over the net and usually an open side of the court to direct these at.

    Both shots take pretty good timing though and quite a bit of practice to make them dependable. If you're at lower levels like me, you're better off just taking a bit off the pace of your swing and trying your best to either a) backup and focus on making clean contact as it falls or b) hitting it on the rise/half-volleying it back.
     
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  9. raiden031

    raiden031 Legend

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    When some of you say 'hit it flat', are you talking about a stroke that uses only a half-swing? My question was really only concerned with hitting a top-spin forehand that is high. I think I see it alot usually around the service line. For instance, the opponent might hit a backhand slice that goes about face height, and the other guy will hit it on the fly with a full swing and crush it for a winner.
     
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  10. Alexandros

    Alexandros Professional

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    #10
  11. dave333

    dave333 Hall of Fame

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    I love high balls, hit a mean cross court shot w/ huge angle. I hit it flatter but still theres a slight upward movement for topspin.
     
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