home schooled kids vs. kids in regular school

Discussion in 'Junior League & Tournament Talk' started by papatenis, Aug 13, 2009.

  1. papatenis

    papatenis Semi-Pro

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    i just don't understand how parents would home school their child for reasons related to tennis. do they not know that they are robbing their child of a normal childhood? the chances of a tennis playing child becoming a professional is less than 1%. it seems that every year, i encounter more and more home schooled kids at tournaments. what gives
     
  2. tennismom42

    tennismom42 Semi-Pro

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    Not to mention home-schooled are the most likely courses to be denied by the NCAA.
     
  3. TennisTaxi

    TennisTaxi Rookie

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    OK, this subject again..and it is time for me to finally "type" up. Yes, my son was home-schooled, but no, not actually home-schooled but was in an independent school program (no NCAA problems). Would we do it again? NO...did it work why we were doing it..YES.

    Why did we do it? At the time, his teachers in "public school" were totally uncooperative with his travel requirements, he played National level tournaments frequently and had to miss school to play and travel. He would miss things in class and then he could not catch up. It was very difficult trying to balance everything out. He then was offered a chance to be involved in a full-time tennis program (while he lived at home--not your typical academy) and we decided he would give it a try.

    He was in middle school at the time. Socially, he was with kids all day in the tennis program, with his home friends in the late afternoons and on the weekends he was at tourneys...he learned to travel, to adjust to new situations, speak up for himself, he saw the US (living history) and made friends from around the county. He had all his old friends at home...he just didn't go to school with them.

    He made it into the top 100 nationally while he did this...No illusions of going Pro...just allowing him to to follow his passion..and to learn to think outside the box. He is now back in "regular" high school and having the fewer problems with teacher cooperation but still misses school way too much.

    You may think he has not had a "normal" childhood...whatever you think may be normal...but we call it "enhanced" because he has done more and seen more than most kids his age....and is better for it.

    It may not be for all but before you judge...think!! As the liberals say, If only closed minds came with closed mouths

    OK, now go ahead and slam me..I have been a bad parent...I know!!
     
  4. fruitytennis1

    fruitytennis1 Professional

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    You can always hope...
     
  5. tennismom42

    tennismom42 Semi-Pro

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    Personally, I practice keeping my kids, as kids, as long as possible. They can be adults for 70 years. As for tennis, they can play that for the next 70 years, but you can't do prom again. You can't learn how to overcome the troubles existent in a HS setting, while you're on a tennis court. There are valuable lessons to be learned in the balancing of both worlds. To me, too much of anything causes inbalance.

    I realize that there is a critical window for training intensely while they (male or female) are in their teens.

    Just my two cents.
     
  6. TennisCoachFLA

    TennisCoachFLA Banned

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    After home schooling our kids the past 3 years, I would not change a thing.

    To each their own, I think my kids are turning out to be very amazing people and frankly I don't care what anyone else thinks about our choice.

    I have met countless losers in life who went to prom, so I doubt that really matters at all in the big picture.
     
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2009
  7. TennisTaxi

    TennisTaxi Rookie

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    As I said, it is not for everyone and he has returned to high school, been to Prom, a few actually (more expensive than a national tourney weekend)... Yep, dealing with high school issues has been tougher than any tennis match, including drinking, drugs and hormonal females!! Ain't high school wonderful :shock:
     
  8. TennisCoachFLA

    TennisCoachFLA Banned

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    Unfortunately many Americans peak in high school.

    If I see one more person with the same hair cut at 40 that they had in their graduation photo I think I will be sick!

    The funniest thing in the world is a 45 year old lady still wearing her big 80's hair.
     
  9. a-naik.1

    a-naik.1 Professional

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    The reason that I have been given for some of the kids I give lessons to for being home schooled is the issue of travel and the teachers being incompetent. So there are several issues that go into why some kids are home schooled. I see no problem in this as I wish I was home schooled at one point because of travels/national tennis tournys and teachers that were later fired by the school board.
     
  10. amarone

    amarone Semi-Pro

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    ALthough my son is in public school, the travel issue is certainly a pain. Sectional level 1 - 3 tournaments run through Monday (if you are still in). The policy at my son's high school is that if you miss a test/quiz with an unauthorized absence (and they will not authorize a tennis tournament), you get 0% for that test. You cannot make it up later.
     
  11. tennis-silver

    tennis-silver Banned

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    We don't have kids yet, however, I will homeschool whether they play tennis or not.
    My niece is homeschooled (doesn't play tennis) and she is academically superior to any of her friends. ( yes she has friends even though she is homeschooled)
    Public schools are a joke!!!
     
  12. Toad

    Toad Rookie

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    That's a pretty big generalization. I went to a public high school and I KNOW the education I received was far superior to students at many private schools. I know this because I was not a super stand out student in my high school...I did good, I think I was around the 20th% with my class rank. I then went to a decent (and private) college where I ended at the top of my class, ahead of a couple high school valedictorians (one who went to a private high school), my roommate who was home schooled, and several other students that went to private and public schools.

    I am now in an Engineering PhD program...if public schools were a joke, how could this be possible? The education you get is most directly related to what you are willing to put into it, not where you receive it.

    As an aside, my college roommate was a very smart person, but he was also very socially awkward. If you go the homeschooling route, make sure your kids get plenty of social interaction around kids their own age.
     
  13. region2champion

    region2champion Rookie

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    MOST neighborhood public high schools are a joke. However, there are exceptions. I am getting the best education in Jacksonville going to a public school.
     
  14. TennisTaxi

    TennisTaxi Rookie

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    My son's current high school policy....miss 14 days of school and automatic "C" in the class regardless of your true grade...
     
  15. ubermeyer

    ubermeyer Hall of Fame

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    haha my brother skipped prom.

    but seriously, what if they were super talented? you don't get the chance to be the next Roger Federer every day, either.
     
  16. robby c

    robby c Semi-Pro

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    My sister home schooled her 5 kids for religious and academic reasons. Her oldest 3 got 32,28,and 26 on ACT boards. Her oldest girl graduated with honors from college last year. Her oldest son is about to. Her middle girl is a Sr in HS. So far so good.
    Her degree is Childhood Ed so she was prepared.
    There's a boy in my town that has a high Junior ranking and is home schooled. But tennis came after their family's choice to stay at home. With all the gov't indoctrination in schools these days I agree with parents who take on the task.
    Don't forget, most of our founding fathers were home schooled. Public Education has barely been around for 100 years. If the Supreme Court had kept God in school we'd all be better off, because discipline left soon after. The American concept of Right and Wrong came from Judeo-Christian Values.
    If kids want college scholarships learn a musical instrument. Much cheaper way to go.
    Robby C
     
    Last edited: Aug 19, 2009
  17. Esti

    Esti New User

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    Its not how well you do in highscool..it's how well you do in college. I know a lot of smart people who went into college with full rides - and end up losing them because of partying issues and eventually failing. Not saying anything is wrong with doing well in highschool :D
     
    Last edited: Aug 14, 2009
  18. TennisNinja

    TennisNinja Hall of Fame

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    Robby, religion seriously has nothing to do with how well a kid does in school. Get over it.

    Anyways, I've met some homeschooled kids who are perfectly fine, and others who are so socially awkward it's not even funny. Like these 3 guys who are brothers and they're all just so weird, have really annoying voices and don't really 'get' things socially sometimes.
     
  19. autumn_leaf

    autumn_leaf Hall of Fame

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    normal child hood is over-rated. people always forget the horrid times if you were constantly bullied. go watch some lifetime! =P

    also. most of the stuff learned from grade school to high school is actually repeated again in intro courses in college XD! good thing for me though because apparently I learned next to nothing in my science course...still got Bs and As though lol.
     
  20. slice bh compliment

    slice bh compliment G.O.A.T.

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    I was top 100 in the country, too. It was amazing to see America by plane, train and rental car. I leanred a lot (people, regions, maps, budgeting for balls, meals, strings, etc.)

    But....LIVING HISTORY? I like how you say it, but....that's a stretch. It was mostly tennis clubs, strip malls, Holiday Inns, sandwich shops and pizza places, let's be honest.

    Amen.
    I guess that's why we have receding hairlines and graying temples?

    Yeah man. It's not the 'partying' that'll kill you. It's the partying ISSUES.
     
  21. a-naik.1

    a-naik.1 Professional

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    Yeah been there and agree with you there.
     
  22. riponeverything

    riponeverything New User

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    The real question is..how much of an advantage do homeshooled kids really have vs kids that attend high schools?
     
  23. JoshDragon

    JoshDragon Hall of Fame

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    Why is the prom considered to be so important? I don't get it.
     
  24. SoCal10s

    SoCal10s Hall of Fame

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    let's just talk about tennis.. if that's the case then for top tournament players,I would say it's almost a must.. with regular school schedules,how is a top player going to practice and work out the number amount of hours needed to get and stay on top.. most academy kids do 6 hours a day of tennis plus fitness.. if you want to compete with that,you've better do at least half of what they are doing..at the end of fall when daylight gets dark about 4:45 and you get out of school at 3:pm how do you want to practice ? for the eastern guys,prime time indoors is very expensive .. then you have to make the grades and travel to different national or ITF tournaments that may end during school time..so you have to miss school and a lot of school districts will not work with you on attendance because they get funded for each day you attend,so if you skip too many classes,teachers are forced to drop your grade,no matter how well you may be doing.. Jr. tennis is a very tough business.. you really got to stay on top and every little edge you can get is just that much better for you..
     
  25. SoCal10s

    SoCal10s Hall of Fame

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    well at the time it's very important,but now heck,I don't even know where that girl I went with is at now.. so I guess it's like your first everything.. it's just a fond memory ..
     
  26. TennisTaxi

    TennisTaxi Rookie

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    When ever we traveled we made it a point to take him to see historical places in the region...so, he saw historical places...maybe "living" is not quite the right word...but you get the idea..missions in CA, battlefields in Kentucky, liberty bell in Philly...places he never would have seen if we hadn't traveled for tennis....much better than seeing a picture in a book:)
     
  27. TennisCoachFLA

    TennisCoachFLA Banned

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    Our home schooled kids have surfed with native children on a remote island, sailed through storms in the caribbean, sat in with astronauts training for space shuttle missions, spent a month last summer with kids from a war torn country.....those kids have such an incredible outlook on life. They have seen the best and worst of the real world, the best and worst of many cultures, volunteered countless hours for many causes. I see them interact with regular schooled kids and its like a brilliant spotlight next to a 20 watt bulb.

    I highly doubt when they are 45 they will give a plop about not going 'to prom'.
     
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2009
  28. dcmetro102

    dcmetro102 New User

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    i agree..........
     
  29. slice bh compliment

    slice bh compliment G.O.A.T.

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    Yes, great stuff, man. I know what you meant. We did that, too, on every trip. I appreciate it a lot, but it was mostly touristy BS. I saw it really as just good family time between warm-ups, drills, stretches and matches. Not really a substitute for school.

    Ideally, schools take more field trips. Families take more field trips and weekend trips. During/between tournaments is hardly ideal.
     
  30. TnsMan2

    TnsMan2 Banned

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    Home schooled kids have a horrible life they do not get to be in a public school where they are tempted by other kids trying to get them to do drugs they also miss out on kids pressuring them into drinking alcohol , home school kids also miss out in being pressured to having sex at and early age and possibly getting pregnant and having to choose between having and abortio* or quitting school and raising a child ,

    Then you also miss out on the overcrowded classrooms and if your in Ca you have all the illegals with a language barrier destroying the structure of the learning format in the classrooms plus all the money cuts from the government making the work load worse for the teacher who all ready have a mess as it is .

    The problem i find with most HS kids is they have parents who show they care about their education and want them to succeed and wont pressure them to do wrong drink, drugs, sex, cuss, talk back , Who would want their kids to deal with this situation?? Tennisflorida shame on you for wanting and doing the best for your kids .
     
  31. tennis-silver

    tennis-silver Banned

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    Very well put!
     
  32. slice bh compliment

    slice bh compliment G.O.A.T.

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    Re: post no. 30....^that^ kind of horrible peer pressure happens in social situations outside of schools, too, you know. I'll be honest, I've seen that kind of pressure in ''Youth Groups'' and Church groups. I've definitely seen it while traveling in tennis.

    To blame all of that on schools is not entirely fair.

    Homeschooling is a great choice, if done with some perspective and with some of the field trips listed in post no. 27.....exceptional! Sadly, I've seen it half-assed....and the kids were prepared for college tennis, but not college courses. Then again, most home-schooled kids have way higher board scores than kids in public schools. It just depends.

    From my perspective, I think the best parts of a traditional school setting are:
    the feeling of being a part of something collective,
    the sports,
    chaperoned social events dances, proms, etc)
    field trips,
    group projects,
    PE, where you play sports you might not otherwise play in a large group setting.....I LOVED PE and we had GREAT teachers,
    the standards (full disclosure: I went to an exceptional public Jr. HS and HS in a suburban setting near a huge city),
    the community/village/township feel to the place (fundraisers/pancake breakfast, athletic banquets, benefit concert/battle of the bands at school once a year, going to see the buddies play a baseball or football game every now and then),
    student government, going to see a girlfriend or her friends in some recital or dance thing,
    finishing tennis practice, homework and dinner, then catching the 2nd half of the varsity basketball game on a weeknight,
    doing some conditioning with the soccer team or the track guys.

    I was only moderately involved in all of the stuff I listed above. Maybe home-schooled kids get to do some of that, too. Mostly, I was playing regional/sectional/local tournaments and going to nationals when possible....but overall, I think I did have a really well-rounded childhood/education and junior career...and I am thankful that my school was the lynchpin to that education. My talent and my drive were never at the level of a Pete Sampras, but I definitely appreciate the way I was raised.
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2009
  33. JoshDragon

    JoshDragon Hall of Fame

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    That is somewhat of a generalization, not all public school kids are like that. However, you are mostly right. Home schoolers usually don't lose their enthusiasm for learning and many times they are well ahead of the public schoolers.

    Which country did they go to last summer? I hope you went with them.
     
  34. papatenis

    papatenis Semi-Pro

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    BRAVO, RIGHT ON!!!
     
  35. flat

    flat Rookie

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    I don't agree with this. I do agree you need enough practice to get up there, but once you get enough practice, I think your natural talent level (strength, quickness, coordination, speed, height, mental toughness) takes over....

    Let me give you some counter points:
    1) If you believe in the book "Outliers", then it's actually ~10K hrs that matter. 10K hrs is roughly 3hrs/day, 7 days/week, for 10 years. So you can argue for tennis, if a kid (boy) started around 8 or 9, you might want to put in 4 hr/day (so he can take a day off) so he will peak around 17 or so.


    2) Look at Agassi, Clisters, Davenport, anyone who's taken a significant break from tennis, and not play at all. The fact they can come back (while supposedly all the other players continued to practice during that time) states that they have reached the plateau, and any additional practice time beyond getting them in shape, or work out a few kinks, will not matter.

    3) I don't think any top players actually practices 6hrs a day. I think Federer (this is from memory) is more like a morning 1hr & afternoon 1hr, with some other exercise thrown in between.

    So I really don't believe you need 6hrs/day...I wish we have stats from all the top pros to see how much they practiced during their junior years?
     
  36. GameSetNavritilova

    GameSetNavritilova New User

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    If you work your butt off while on court, 1.5 to 2 hours is sufficient. Remember, the academies are DEEP into your pockets, so they have to keep you on court to justify the fees.

    Home schooling a young child so he/she can be a tennis pro is a plan that will backfire. Sure there'll always be a success story out there. Somebody won the lottery last night too.
     
  37. fruitytennis1

    fruitytennis1 Professional

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    Agreeed with post 36. Nearly no one goes pro.
     
  38. TennisCoachFLA

    TennisCoachFLA Banned

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    What we have here on this thread is judging and generalizing. Of course producing a money making tennis pro player has the same slim chance as winning the lottery. So what?

    The family sees potential, they go for it full bore, they feel homeschooling increases their odds.....if the kid doesn't make it the family has no regrets and does not look back wondering if they gave it their all.

    Seems to be a totally personal family decision and it is impossible for outsiders to call it wrong or right. No one can put a price on looking back and knowing you gave it your all.

    So what if academies are deep in most parent's pockets? The money pays secretaries, coaches, maintenance workers, contractors, investors and on and on. Those people spend the money at restaurants and lots of area businesses. Those business owners pay for their kids to become doctors and engineers and teachers. The cycle of life.

    I highly doubt our homeless shelters and jails are filled with parents and kids whose dreams of tennis stardom didn't work out. Seems pretty victimless to me, millions of people every day are spending money on unrealistic endeavors. Simply a personal choice.
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2009
  39. Deuce

    Deuce Banned

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    ^ What parent in their right mind would want a "normal childhood" for their child?
    A normal childhood today is rather pitiful. As is a "regular school"
    Let us raise those low standards, please...

    Home-schooled children tend to think more critically and independently, rather than merely conform and go with the crowd.
    Naturally, there will always be exceptions. But the higher percentage of the time, home-schooled kids will think 'outside of the box' more than will kids who go to a school.

    ^ Yeah.... public schools are not a healthy place. Especially for emotionally and psychologically developing children.
    The standard of public schools is forever lowering.

    Also, public schools traditionally - and even more so recently - simply do their best to create 'normal', conforming, obedient kids who question little or nothing.
     
  40. dantesinferno18

    dantesinferno18 Semi-Pro

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    home school kids are socialy akward
     
  41. Deuce

    Deuce Banned

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    ^ But they likely know how to spell properly.

    As for being socially awkward... It comes with being unconventional.
    Thank god.
     
  42. slice bh compliment

    slice bh compliment G.O.A.T.

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    Phenomenol post. Ya man it's rediculous. Kids from tredishinel skules are definately way more well-ajested and like, normal?

    EDIT: Aw, I didn't look at this new page.....and Deuce beat me to it.
     
  43. TennisNinja

    TennisNinja Hall of Fame

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    It's true though, some home school kids just don't do that well socially. I personally know some home schooled kids who are just.... different, but I know others who are perfectly normal. Does it matter how people spell on an internet forum though? This isn't English class, even though it does look nicer when everything is correct.
     
  44. TnsMan2

    TnsMan2 Banned

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    homeschool kids have trouble socially give me a break , take most cell phones with the texting away from a public schooler and you have a kid who will show you major issues.
     
  45. slice bh compliment

    slice bh compliment G.O.A.T.

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    wat u dnt thnk txtg counts as a cumuncashn skill?

    I know a smart, vibrant woman in her mid-40s who graduated college and everything. Writes emails like they're texts. All run-on sentences, all the time. Can't spell worth a damn. So poor at geography, too. I don't know how this happens in a country like the US.

    I like the www and cellular technology and all, but there is a darkside to it.....an unintented side-effect: it's turning people of slightly below average intellect into inept twits.
     
  46. TennisNinja

    TennisNinja Hall of Fame

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    Just from personal experience, and note I said some.

    Also, I can say that a lot of kids in public schools would do fine with a cell. I didn't get one until freshman year and I didn't show major issues. Sure some people do text all the time but the majority aren't glued to their phones 24/7 like how the media makes it out to be.
     
  47. slice bh compliment

    slice bh compliment G.O.A.T.

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    It has become socially acceptable to be in an actual conversation with a live human....and hold up a cell phone, fire off a quick text or two and pretend to pay attention to the original conversation.

    It's a whole new sense of entitlement. Like, what I am doing right now is more important than what we are doing right now.

    Also, there's this weird pressure to return all emails and texts IMMEDIATELY.

    I recently met a middle aged woman whose friends think she is odd for keeping her cellphone in her car or in her bag. For whatev reason, the chick views it as a convenience rather than an appendage. The nerve!
     
  48. dantesinferno18

    dantesinferno18 Semi-Pro

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    Im not saying im against homeschool kids im just saying alot of them dont do as well in some situations involving people. Also I know a few and they just dont know how to get along with other kids. Im not saying all of them dont but from my expierinces with them they dont.

    Also THIS IS NOT ENGLISH CLASS!!
     
  49. Deuce

    Deuce Banned

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    ^ The 'darkside' may be unintended... but it is also inherent. It cannot be avoided, as human beings - as is well known - will abuse absolutely everything they have an opportunity to abuse.
    That's how potentially positive things turn into negative things very quickly.

    ^ Could it be because - gasp! - they have a higher standard than most... and so don't "talk about" dumb things, which sets them apart from the majority, and is thus exclusive rather than inclusive.
    Much of the time, that's what it is, rather than some sort of personal 'defect' as you infer.

    ^ I feel sorry for you for thinking that proper spelling is only important in English class.
    For one whose first language is not English, it's forgivable... but not for those for whom English is their first language.
    For the latter group, frequent spelling errors reveal one to be, at best, very lazy, and, at worst, dumb, in the eyes of the intelligent.
     
  50. papatenis

    papatenis Semi-Pro

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    Hay Duche, do u felt sorrie 4 mi? orr am I lazy end dump.
     

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