Hospital costs in Russia are really low

Discussion in 'Odds & Ends' started by acura9927, Jun 18, 2012.

  1. acura9927

    acura9927 Semi-Pro

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    Last year I went to St. Petersburg, Russia for 4 days and got sick the 1st day. Overacid in the stomach, cant eat cant drink cant sleep. So they hotel calls the nurse who drives to the hotel to check on you. I then was taken to the Public Hospital for a overnight visit that included lots of lots of doctor visits and test of blood and ultrasound. Including the ride, food, bedding , doctors, test the total cost for one day came to 96 USA dollars!

    Granted I had to sleep on a cot in the hallway and with a shared bathroom with all the males on the floor. This is what they call a real foreign exp.

    St. Petersburg is a very expensive city and 96 bucks is just a little bit more than a stay at a hotel in the city center. I was expecting 700-800 bucks.

    Thank you Russia for taking care of me!
     
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  2. ollinger

    ollinger Legend

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    What was Sharapova (Yuri, that is) thinking when they left???!!!
     
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  3. ollinger

    ollinger Legend

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    (note: perhaps they should spend a little more on health care there. The average life expectancy is about 70 years, one of the worst in the industrialized world)
     
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  4. acura9927

    acura9927 Semi-Pro

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    Well in St. Petersburg they did offer me a choice of Public or Private Hospitals. Being sticker shocked by how much food and services are in St. Pete I of course took the Public Hospital.
    I got sick in Thailand once too, one night at a Bangkok Hospital was something like 650 bucks or so. So some things are cheap in the Russian Federation. Very cheap. Their economy is tied to the price of Gas. I enjoyed the nice looking people and how they dress and music but the food, not my style.
     
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  5. spaceman_spiff

    spaceman_spiff Hall of Fame

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    If you were shocked by the price of food and services in St. Pete, then you were eating and visiting the wrong places.

    St. Pete and Moscow can be really expensive if you don't shop around, but they can be incredibly cheap if you know what you're doing (I lived in Moscow for two years on a $13k salary with no problems). Just for comparison, a ticket on the underground in London will cost you $5 or so. A ticket for the Moscow Metro will cost you less than $1.

    As for health care costs, I smashed my head playing soccer here in England and had to get stitches. Went to the hospital, waited for a little while, quick check by the doctor, then stitches. Total cost out of pocket, £0.
     
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  6. Fearsome Forehand

    Fearsome Forehand Professional

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    Isn't that mostly due to the fact that they drink and smoke like fiends?

    Next time, take some Mylanta or Tums, and maybe avoid ingesting the flaming hot pepper sauce right before bedtime. :smile:

    One either pays out of pocket for medical costs (with cash or insurance), pays via one's own taxation or pays with other people's money/taxes. There is no free lunch.
     
    Last edited: Jun 19, 2012
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  7. Steady Eddy

    Steady Eddy Hall of Fame

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    True. But maybe these countries don't have the problem of recouping losses from big lawsuit settlements. Did you notice that the late Rodney King was a millionaire? In other countries severely injuring yourself doesn't = jackpot.
     
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  8. Fearsome Forehand

    Fearsome Forehand Professional

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    Are you suggesting we have too many lawyers in search of too few legitimate lawsuits so they compensate by introducing frivolous lawsuits into the system?

    Are you suggesting the warning label on your lawnmower that says do not stick your head into the blade area while it is engaged should not be necessary. :)

    There are a lot of factors that drive up costs. Malpractice costs are certainly one of those factors.

    And if Rodney died with any money left, I would be somewhat surprised.
     
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  9. volleygirl

    volleygirl Semi-Pro

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    Good point Fearsome Forehand,,,the only ones getting a free lunch are the ones paying no taxes and the illegal aliens.

    Both parties are so crooked, almost every issue has one of the parties in their pockets so we are screwed by one of them all the time. The trial lawyers have the Democrats in their back pockets so these BS lawsuits will never go away.
     
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  10. Fearsome Forehand

    Fearsome Forehand Professional

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    Well, I don't disagree with your point, but you just doomed this thread to be deleted. :)
     
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  11. volleygirl

    volleygirl Semi-Pro

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    My bad FF, will try and keep the truth out of my posts in the future
     
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  12. spaceman_spiff

    spaceman_spiff Hall of Fame

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    I'll throw this in before the thread gets deleted

    Some lunches are cheaper than others.

    The portion of my taxes that goes to fund the NHS is smaller than my health insurance costs would be if I were to move back to the US. Plus, I don't get denied coverage because of pre-existing conditions.
     
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  13. Fearsome Forehand

    Fearsome Forehand Professional

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    And so, you eat off someone else's plate.

    I have heard bad things about the NHS. I imagine it is okay for routine things if you don't live in a large urban area.

    I think if everyone had to pay cash, costs would go down and service would improve. If I bought bread with insurance, it would probably be $100+ loaf.

    Lasik surgery is a good example what occurs with a cash based system.

    Strange topic for a tennis forum.:)
     
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  14. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    Open up more seats for medical education and let there be real competition like other fields. Let patients sign a form agreeing not to sue for malpractice if they are OK with it, in exchange for lower costs and not suggesting useless tests. Don't let hospitals bill $10 for a disposable glove. Encourage the use of primary health centers for minor stuff. My employer has introduced a 24-7 online doctor consultation scheme, with powers to prescribe medicines after video examination. I haven't tried it, but I hope it is the future.
     
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  15. volleygirl

    volleygirl Semi-Pro

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    If they cant deny anyone with pre-existing coverage, why whould anyone really carry coverage until they come down with something realy bad? I think they should be allowed to not cover someone that refuses to carry insurance until they day they find out they have diabetes, cancer, AIDs or some other disease they costs a furtune.
     
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  16. spaceman_spiff

    spaceman_spiff Hall of Fame

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    I'm not eating off of others' plates. It's just that medical procedures here cost less than they do in the US. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv...res-in-the-us/. So, when I pay my share of taxes to fund the NHS, it comes out to be less than what comparable insurance would cost for a guy my age in the US (which I find pretty nice :) ).

    Also, having had a few hospital visits in the US, I can't say they offer more than what I get here in the UK or what I had during my year in Finland (which also involved a hospital visit that involved surgery). Neither the NHS nor the Finnish system is perfect, but they're pretty good from what I've seen. And for all its costs, the US system isn't any better.

    It's one reason I suggest that more students in the US should take advantage of the study abroad programs at their schools and colleges like I did. When you've lived in other countries, scare tactics don't work on you because you've seen how things really are.
     
    Last edited: Jun 19, 2012
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  17. spaceman_spiff

    spaceman_spiff Hall of Fame

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    The NHS is paid for by taxes. So, if you have a job that pays enough money for you to be taxed, then you're paying for it.

    You have the option to buy additional private insurance that is accepted at non-NHS facilities if you like, so there's no monopoly limiting your options.
     
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  18. dr325i

    dr325i Legend

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    BTW, it is not only Russia that provides decent healthcare at NORMAL cost. We lived for past two years in Prague, CZ. The hospitals are super nice over there, although the locals believe they are not. If you're foreigner but employed and paying taxes (lower than in the USA for example), you're completely covered and the visit and procedure costs just over 1 (one) EUR co-payment. If you're just a tourist, it is more expensive, but FAR from what you would expect in the States.

    The private hospitals and doctor visits are also affordable, more expensive, but again, the price cannot be compared to the US ripoff.

    There is no real reason that doctors make as much as they do in the USA (except for some) and furthermore, that they have to shell out a considerable portion of their income for insurance purposes.

    There is no reason that I paid for the same prescription drug 1.5 EUR in Europe and my co-payment with full insurance on it is $40 in the USA...

    In 2005 I got bad food poisoning in Taiwan on a weekend. The emergency doctor came to my hotel, gave me a bunch of shots, prescribed and issued a bunch of medications, followed up the next day with a visit and the total bill was less than a $100.
     
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  19. athiker

    athiker Hall of Fame

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    Just for giggles! Radial Keratotomy was a precursor to LASIK...what put this type of surgery on the popular map.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radial_keratotomy

    I vaguely remembered reading this somewhere so did a quick Google. I had LASIK back in '04...amazing...scary...but amazing. But no I'm not looking to move to Russia any time soon. :)
     
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  20. Fearsome Forehand

    Fearsome Forehand Professional

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    Yes, RK was nuts. Cutting the lense into pie like slices to flatten it.

    It was considered cutting edge (pun intended) once upon a time.

    As I recall, it was discovered by accident. A guy suffered damage to his lense (from glass) and that led to the development of RK.

    I am a candidate for lasik but am too much of a fraidy cat to allow someone to slice up my eyes. Better to have blurry vision than no vision. :)

    Besides, I am so used to wearing glasses and contacts, it is second nature to me now.
     
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  21. Eph

    Eph Professional

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    Lasik is terrible, unless of course you like dry eyes, among other problems.
     
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  22. Larrysümmers

    Larrysümmers Hall of Fame

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    you mean there is a system that works better than ours? blasphemy and treason i say
     
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  23. millicurie999

    millicurie999 Semi-Pro

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    ..And Un-American:)
     
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  24. dParis

    dParis Hall of Fame

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    Eeen Russia, you don't go to hospital. Hospital come to you.

    Vhat a count-tree!
     
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  25. spaceman_spiff

    spaceman_spiff Hall of Fame

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    Wow, this thread hasn't been deleted

    The thing that makes St. Pete and Moscow seem very expensive is that there is only a small number of businesses that can target foreign customers. On top of that, the local rich people have a mentality that paying more proves they are better, and they often go to the same places as the foreigners. So, that drives up the prices at certain places. However, the normal locals pay much less.

    Getting a haircut is a good example. When I lived there, if you spoke Russian, you could get a men's haircut for $5-15, depending on whether you went to the super-cheap local barber or a nicer salon. However, if you couldn't speak Russian, the handful of places with English speaking stylists would charge far more than that (I think it was something like $30-40).

    It's the same with restaurants, taxi services, and so on. Even the museums charge foreigners a different price than they do the locals (you have to be able to read the signs to see just how much cheaper the local price is). When I was a student in St. Pete, when I went to a museum, I'd just hand over my student ID and the exact amount for student admission without saying a word. If they heard my accent, they wouldn't give me the local price.
     
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  26. athiker

    athiker Hall of Fame

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    Well grounded fear. I would never try to talk someone into LASIK. The stakes are just too high. Halfway through the procedure I was scared to death and thinking what the heck am I doing getting perfectly correctable functional eyeballs sliced and lasered. In hindsight...love it...would not go in again if I ever need "tweaking" though. 8 years and counting with at least 20/20. We do a lot of waterports and that was the decision maker for me.

    *sorry for the thread derail...
     
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  27. acura9927

    acura9927 Semi-Pro

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    I do plan on going again to Russia, this time to a very small city or small town. I've lived in HK and NYC so I've had more than enough big city life. I've always had a better foreign exp going to small towns overseas. Just not easy at all by yourself in Russia, I was confined to Nesky Prospect for 4 days in ST. Pete. Plenty to see and do just way too modern in some ways to feel like you got away.

    Maybe I try Ukraine or the former Khazastan ( spell ) next.
     
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  28. YK

    YK New User

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    Russian health care system is a junk and has been that way for a while. You get exactly what you pay for.

    Mortality from communicable diseases is about 20% higher than the Eur-B +C average and 200% higher than the Eur-A average.
    Mortality from non-communicable diseases is about 15% higher than the Eur-B+C average and 125% higher than the Eur-A average.
    .

    Source: http://www.euro.who.int/__data/assets/pdf_file/0003/103593/E88405.pdf

    Your problem, most likely, could have been easily solved by OTC meds.

    Ukraine and Kazakhstan aren't really that removed from urban ways, Ukraine especially, unless you go to really small places. If you decided to do so, I'd seriously look at a medevac insurance.
     
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  29. Fuji

    Fuji Legend

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    I'd love to go to Russia and Ukraine as it's where my family hails from. Sounds like you had an experience!

    You should come to Canada, our hospital costs are dirt cheap. :D

    -Fuji
     
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  30. spaceman_spiff

    spaceman_spiff Hall of Fame

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    Try going to Novgorod. It's the oldest city in Russia, so there's a lot of history to see. (St. Petersburg will need to be your base.)

    After that, when you're back in St. Pete, set up a trip to Petergof. It was the Czars' answer to Versailles. If you want to see some small cities based around Teutonic castles, you can take the train from St. Pete over to Tallinn and Riga.

    You might need to double-check your Russian visa to make sure it allows you multiple entries. Estonia and Latvia won't have any reservations about letting you visit, but Russian visa rules might prevent you from re-entering once you have left. It depends on the visa you have.
     
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  31. spaceman_spiff

    spaceman_spiff Hall of Fame

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    One word of advice: don't go with your wife/girlfriend. If you do, stare directly at the ground the entire time you're there or else you'll end up getting slapped (lots of eye candy to get caught staring at).
     
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  32. Fuji

    Fuji Legend

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    :shock: :lol:

    I definitely have to go! It's okay to look, as long as I don't touch! Hahaha!

    -Fuji
     
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  33. Fearsome Forehand

    Fearsome Forehand Professional

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    If you fly into Moscow or another big city In Russia and then want to take a second flight, you might need some sort of special visa that allows you to go from one part of the airport to another. One of my tennis buddies went to the Belarus via Moscow. He made his own travel arrangements and did not know about the second visa requirement. He was detained in the Moscow? airport for a couple of days until he got it straightened out.

    So, make sure you know the visa rules and bring enough cash to bribe people as needed. :)
     
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2012
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