How Do U Recover?

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by dannysul, Apr 5, 2013.

  1. dannysul

    dannysul Rookie

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    What are you doing to get back on the court the next day after a tough match? Are you taking supplements? Ice baths? Any specific foods to target? How do u shake the soreness to prepare for battle the following day?
     
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  2. SteveI

    SteveI Legend

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    I take the next day off... :)
     
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  3. dannysul

    dannysul Rookie

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    I should to but I don't. Lol
     
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  4. ollinger

    ollinger Legend

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    You should but you don't?? Start looking for a good orthopedist.
     
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  5. dannysul

    dannysul Rookie

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    Is this my new member initiation from the hall of famers or something?? :):???:
     
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  6. Say Chi Sin Lo

    Say Chi Sin Lo Legend

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    I think it's hard to find a instantaneous solution for recovering well enough for the next day. You can eat all those super foods and take a bath in the antarctic, and they certainly help. But, if you're not in good tennis shape, you're just not going to recover as fast as someone who is in tennis shape.

    Put in the gym time, do your stretches to keep you muscles/tendons flexible, and get your body ready to play back to back.

    Every 2 months or so, I set aside a week to play 7days nonstop. Just so my body is used to playing consecutive days.
     
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  7. WildVolley

    WildVolley Legend

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    I walk after the match. Try to stretch a little. Eat well, and take no alcohol. But I find the most important thing is to get more sleep.
     
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  8. The Isomotion31

    The Isomotion31 Semi-Pro

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    eat, hydrate, ice, rest, sleep
     
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  9. cluckcluck

    cluckcluck Hall of Fame

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    A beer and sleep. :)

    Kidding. Depends on how hard I play. Generally I ice my knee or shoulder. Light stretching if I need.
     
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  10. RogueFLIP

    RogueFLIP Semi-Pro

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    After a match:

    20-30 oz water
    16 oz green smoothie
    Pb & J if I feel I need it
    Stretch and or foam roller
    Ice anywhere if I need it
    Hour or two extra sleep if possible

    Sometimes I'll take 800mg of echinacea with goldenseal if I know I won't be able to sleep a full night to do work or whatever and I have another match the next day.

    But like others have said, I try not to schedule back to back days.

    Sleep IMO is the most important factor, at least for me it is.
     
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  11. limitup

    limitup Professional

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    The #1 most important factor is eating a meal of carbs and protein AS SOON AS POSSIBLE when you're done playing. The sooner the better. This is huge and most people don't do it. After this, the basics like stretching and adequate sleep are all you should need if you're in good shape.
     
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  12. SteveI

    SteveI Legend

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    I of course was trying to make a joke. On a more serious note and others will tell you, playing back to back days is not great idea long term. Unlike walking, swimming and cross country skiing, tennis is very hard on your body and does damage to your body every time out. With any court based sport, to perform at a high level you have to be willing put your joints at risk along with other key body parts. While there is some great advice in this thread. on how to recover (if you do indeed need to play the next day), the best way to recover is to rest. BTW... you should not be using tennis to get into shape, you should be in tennis shape before you hit the courts.
     
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  13. KineticChain

    KineticChain Professional

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    be young .
     
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  14. Relinquis

    Relinquis Hall of Fame

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    After the rare loss...

    I cry myself to sleep; usually feel better in the morning.

     
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  15. movdqa

    movdqa Legend

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    If I have to play matches on consecutive days, I try to get a lot of sleep (12 hours or more) in-between matches and also a decent amount of stretching. I also run at least a mile a day (average of four per day) so I might just run one and make it up later in the week. It can be difficult to run four miles after a tough match.

    BTW, I try to avoid scheduling matches on consecutive days as I'm not a young guy anymore. The running just makes it tougher.
     
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  16. charliefedererer

    charliefedererer Legend

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    Those looking to recover in tennis should check out the free, easy-to-read USTA Recovery in Tennis booklet downloadable at http://assets.usta.com/assets/1/dps...ence/RECOVERY PROJECT 22410 EMAIL VERSION.pdf

    Among the areas covered include the following:

    • Nutritional Aspects of Tennis Recovery
    • Heat and Hydration Aspects of Tennis Recovery
    • Psychological Aspects of Tennis Recovery
    • Recovery Aspects of Young Tennis Players
    • Physiological Aspects of Tennis Recovery
    • Musculoskeletal Injuries/ Orthopedics Aspects of Tennis Injury
    • General Medical Aspects of Recovery
    • Coaching Specific Aspects of Recovery


    [​IMG]

    There are a lot of myths and outright falsehoods about recovery, and the USTA does a pretty good job of reviewing the best available data.

    Here are some samples:

    "As little as a 2% loss in body weight, due to dehydration, can have a major negative effect on muscle strength and power."

    "Having recovery drinks and food that contain sufficient levels of sodium is helpful for a number of purposes:
    - Replaces the sodium that is lost in sweat
    - Stimulates glucose (energy) absorption by
    the muscles
    - Increases the athletes drive to drink
    - May reduce the symptoms of exertional
    heat cramps, exertional heat exhaustions
    and exertional hyponatremia."

    "1. Optimize Nutritional Status
    Regularly checking nutritional status via blood, body composition and urine
    analysis by a trained professional is recommended at least once per year.
    2. Carbohydrate Intake
    Consume 30-60 grams of carbohydrates per hour of play.
    3. Protein Intake
    Consume 6-20 grams of protein immediately post-training or
    competition.
    4. Timing is Important
    Start your nutritional recovery within 45 minutes of finishing your training
    session or tournament match."

    "DELAYED ONSET MUSCLE SORENESS (DOMS)
    DOMS arises from the damage and repair processes that result from unaccustomed exercise with a high eccentric focus. The duration of DOMS is directly related to the exercise overload, amount of tissue damage and the fitness level of the athlete. Typically pain is at its peak between 24-72 hours, but it can last as long as 10 days."

    "Sport Massage
    Although massage does feel good and provides a sensation of reducing tight
    muscles, little scientific evidence is available to support claims such as improved blood flow, improved muscle strength, or significant reductions in muscle soreness. However, many studies have shown an improvement in psychological factors such as mood and well-being."

    "Sleep
    Although sleep is an area that is not yet well understood, it could be the most important form of recovery. A good night sleep between 7-9 hours provides invaluable adaptation time to adjust the physical, neurological, immunological and emotional stressors that are experienced during the day."
     
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  17. coaching32yrs

    coaching32yrs Semi-Pro

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    Good advice here. Pay attention to the mental and emotional side. Just as important, maybe more. Need to reover, refocus, figure out what went wrong, what went right, what you are going to do next time out etc. Sometimes you won the first match- too cocky. Lost the first match- no confidence.
     
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  18. SpitFire

    SpitFire New User

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    I can't impart enough the importance of sleep, protein replacement, and foam rolling!
     
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  19. limitup

    limitup Professional

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    What exactly does the foam rolling do? I'm all for anything that could possibly help, but it doesn't do jack for me so I guess it's an individual thing, unlike most of the other tips in this thread. I mean, I know dozens of seriously competitive athletes - including 3 professional athletes - and as far as I know none of them do this foam rolling business. But they all do focus on nutrient timing, nutrient ratios, stretching, and REST.
     
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  20. dannysul

    dannysul Rookie

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    Some great responses here, thank u! I strongly recommend the foam rolling as well. If you're not feeling anything while doing it, especially if you have sore muscles, you might not be using it properly.
     
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  21. RogueFLIP

    RogueFLIP Semi-Pro

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    I use the foam roller all over prior to matches to sort of "wake up" my muscles.

    In between matches I use the foam roller to break up muscle spasms and knots if I can tolerate holding the roller into those knots. If not, I'll just roll over the spasms like a massage.

    Works everywhere....legs, lats, arms....I can use the roller horizontally up and down over my back and I'll almost always self mobilize myself.

    I'll lie over the roller on my back vertically and stretch my pecs and torso and arms.

    Can be pretty tender in some spots, so be careful. There's plenty of videos on Youtube on how to use a foam roller.
     
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  22. magnut

    magnut Hall of Fame

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    Hot tub session followed by lots of steamy sex. After that I am pretty loose and I sleep great!
     
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  23. rk_sports

    rk_sports Hall of Fame

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    Where can I get this done and what are approximate charges (in case med.ins doesn't cover it)?
     
    #23
  24. charliefedererer

    charliefedererer Legend

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    Most people are able to get this done through their primary care physician.

    You absolutely should ask what the cost of the testing is - it can vary widely as labs/hospitals have multiple price levels depending on what your insurer can bargain them down to during negotiations.

    And your insurer can cover all the cost under the "annual physical" - or have significant charges or copays for the blood and urine work.



    Perhaps a word on the recommendation for such testing.
    It is mainly directed at those playing/training at a fairly intense level.
    Still, my nephew was found to have an asymptomatic fairly serious kidney problem just last month having a "routine" urine test going out for the GOLF team.
     
    #24

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