How Do You Make Your Own Balancing Board

Discussion in 'Racquets' started by bleno567, Aug 11, 2006.

  1. bleno567

    bleno567 Rookie

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    I have read several posts that have talked about making your own balancing board. I am cheap and impatient, so i would like to know the exact balance of my racquets without spending 30 bucks on a balancing board, and waiting a few days for it. I have read that it is realitively easy to do using a yard stick and dowel. Im not sure how to actually measure balance using these. They would tell me which side is heavier but not by how much.
     
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  2. JLBAYERR

    JLBAYERR Rookie

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    Yardstick, Tinker Toys, Marble Works peices, Samurai swords. (Maybe not the last one)
     
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  3. ashpookie

    ashpookie Rookie

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    Pencil (round one) and measuring tape.
     
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  4. pchoi04

    pchoi04 Professional

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    For all the time and hassle i would just buy a balance beam.
     
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  5. diredesire

    diredesire Super Moderator

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    If you've got a rolling pin, you're set. The main reason why it's "hard" to build a DIY balancing board is that it's hard to keep the bar stationary, which is how you'd REALLY measure the relative "balance" to the half way point in a racquet.

    Here's how you should go about doing it without building a full balance beam:

    Take your racquet length, and divide it in half (for instance, a 27" racquet = 13.5", 27.5 = 13.75, 28 = 14, etc)

    Mark the halfway point on your racquet with a pencil, or other removable substance (a piece of tape would work well).

    Balance the racquet on your chosen "balance beam." I find a rolling pin works well, provided it is wide enough, and has a nice diameter. If there is an edge, you can find the balance point more easily.

    After you find the balance point, mark the racquet again, with a pencil or more tape.

    After you have marked the racquet, you can measure the difference. Each 1/8th of an inch is 1 "point." If the mark is closer to the handle, the racquet is head light, if it is closer to the head, it is head heavy.

    Cheers, good luck
     
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  6. bleno567

    bleno567 Rookie

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    Thanks alot diredesire that helped alot
     
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  7. paulfreda

    paulfreda Hall of Fame

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    I thought it was 1 point for each 10th of an inch.
    But I have no reference to cite.

    Also, I can get a good measurement with the edge of a table.
    Just keep sliding until it is about to fall off; then mark the spot.
    Measure from the butt and subtract from 13.5 (for 27 inch frame).

    Cheers
     
    #7
  8. joe sch

    joe sch Hall of Fame

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    Inches are in 1/8 divisions, just like for the grip sizes.
    Metric mesurements would be in 1/10 divisions

    PS: You can use your finger for a balancing tool for a really cheap and easy check :)
     
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  9. AJK1

    AJK1 Hall of Fame

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    I use one of the extension poles off my vacuum cleaner. Works fine.
     
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  10. tlm

    tlm Legend

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    Diredesire,you are exactly right.It is that simple,i think is is unwise to pay for something that simple.

    I do exactly like you said, put a thin piece of masking tape at the center,then i use a piece of 1 inch plastic pipe.Balance the racquet+measure how far off center it is.
     
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