How good do you have to be to join a club/league?

Discussion in 'Adult League & Tournament Talk' started by TTMR, Nov 14, 2009.

  1. TTMR

    TTMR Hall of Fame

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    While I am not new to the game of tennis, as such, I have never played competitively (in tournaments, etc.). I play about 3-4 times a month in the summer nowadays with one opponent. I win about 75% of the time. We can sustain 20 shot rallies sometimes but there is not much in the way of pace or spin (he hits very flat, I do hit with spin but not that much). I have some other guys I play with once or twice a year but they are at about the same level as my regular opponent. So essentially, I am a weekend public court hacker, and I certainly don´t pretend to be better than I am.

    Now winter is coming and the municipalities have taken down the public court nets. My regular opponent also suffered a personal tragedy so obviously we will not be playing tennis until at least next spring. Despite the fact that I am not a good player, I do love playing tennis and would like to play a lot more often and with a variety of people. My question is, how good do you have to be to join a club league (beginners level, basically) and not be dismissed as a laughingstock? I don´t want to pay a fee up front and then find myself serving alone on the courts or just not playing at all out of embarrassment. Do hackers like me have any options (besides expensive lessons)? Or should I just stick to hitting against the backboard?

    Note that I am Canadian, so USTA ratings do not apply to me.
     
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  2. Geezer Guy

    Geezer Guy Hall of Fame

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    Anyone can join a club, and pretty much every club (I'd bet) has a pretty wide range of players. I'm sure you'd find someone at your level. And, the more often you play the more you should improve.

    Most clubs have a variety of leagues. Some low level, some high level, some intermediate. Some singles and some doubles. You'd just need to find the right level.

    I suggest you go to a club (or two) and tell them you're INTERESTED in joining, but you don't want to sign a long term contract until you know for sure that you'll fit in. Ask for a free trial membership for a month. Ask for the names of some members you can hit with during that time. Must leagues are for members only, and last longer than a month, so you might not be able to join a league at the club until you actually join the club (and that makes sense). However, you don't want to (possibly) pay an initiation fee and sign a year-long contract for a place you're not sure you'll like.
     
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  3. lf35

    lf35 New User

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    Are you Torontonian? If so, I can give you a list of clubs. Most of them offer houseleagues, round robins, lessons, etc. for a wide range of skill levels.

    I second Geezer Guy's advice on going to a few clubs to ensure a good fit.
     
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  4. TTMR

    TTMR Hall of Fame

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    Nah I´m in the London area so there is only one club with indoor courts around, but thanks for the offer!

    All right well that is reassuring. Thanks for the advice. I will check it out on a trial basis first if they let me.
     
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  5. neverstopplaying

    neverstopplaying Professional

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    Most clubs will offer some sort of group lessons to potential new members so that they can get an idea of what it's like to play against others. At the same time you'll get some pointers, see where your technique stands, and decide where to go from there. Good luck!
     
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