How many rackets does it take to be considered an "experienced stringer"?

Discussion in 'Stringing Techniques / Stringing Machines' started by HIGHER_PRIMATE, May 13, 2013.

  1. HIGHER_PRIMATE

    HIGHER_PRIMATE Banned

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    I've been stringing ever since I was 15 (19 now). I first started on my coaches Alpha crank, and then moved on to a a friends NEOS and finally got a machine for my 18th birthday from my family which was a Combo 6010 (a fine stringer, if I say so my self). I know eagnas is considered sub par, but Victor has always treated me well, since I have one of his top notch stringers.

    Over the years I estimate, Ive done maybe 250-300 rackets 100-120 being my own, the others being mom and dads, or some team mates rackets from USTA and HS teams. I've strung all different rackets from all the major brands (excluding yonex), and done one piece, two piece, ATW, o3 ports, all sorts of string patterns, probably 20 beds of full ALU rough :D (dads preferred string), a few crosses of nat gut (never a full bed), pre-streched natural gut, customized several frames, changed pallets, grips, buttcaps, grommets, done heat shrink sleeves, worked on stringing machines (calibrated, maintained, adjusted clamps), and can deliver a quality job of full syn gut/hybrids in 20 to 25 mins, and full poly beds in 25 to 30 mins, know all the string types and their attributes, and can tie all types of knots, and probably a few more skills of a stringer should have acquired. All that being said, would I be considered an "experienced stringer"? Obviously, the one area I am lacking is in experience level and a youthful mind, but all considered, am I an experienced stringer?


    P.S. Never been to a workshop or have been certifed by USRSA, but is something I would love to attend.
     
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  2. cluckcluck

    cluckcluck Hall of Fame

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    I believe it really has a lot to do with the quality of work over the number of racquets (though it is a part of factoring experience). You could find a stringer that has strung 1000's of rackets but are poor quality and don't feel right; on the other hand you might find a stringer who's only strung 100's but offers high quality work with consistency.
    Quality over quantity.
     
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  3. HIGHER_PRIMATE

    HIGHER_PRIMATE Banned

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    I guess I do quality work, I dont take short cuts or do one pull for two strings, I occasionally do shortcuts on my own rackets if I've had a long day, or need to pump out a sub 20 before a match. But then again, I've never been examined, except by my coach on my first few rackets 4 years ago, when one racket took me 55 minutes!
     
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  4. zapvor

    zapvor Legend

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    based on what you said you are definitely experienced. i think for you this is one of those things where its not how much you learn, but merely a process. as time goes on you will just get better and faster but even now i would say you are pretty good. attitude is more important than being 'experienced' and you seem like you care about tennis and stringing so you are fine
     
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  5. zapvor

    zapvor Legend

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    to put it in perspective i have done over 2000 in the past 365 days, and i have strung everything from racketball to the big bubba to everything in between and have seen almost everything that can happen on a stringing machine. my first job took over 3hrs. now i can do 4 in a hr if i have to
     
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  6. osutennis24

    osutennis24 Rookie

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    since I'm a beginner stringer I'll ask this, how does one cut corners and such?

    Not because I want to, I guess I just don't see how you do it?
     
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  7. bugeyed

    bugeyed Semi-Pro

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    You just asked if you would be considered an experienced stringer & then said that you are obviously lacking in experience level. If you lack experience, you are not experienced!

    kev
     
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  8. andtapes

    andtapes Rookie

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    For me to be an experienced stringer it not about how many racquets have you done, but how you done these racquets and the solutions you have for the problems you face off.
    if You can do 1000 racquets a month and you do them in a bad way can you be considered an experienced stringer? or if you do 100 racquets in a month but you do them very accurate and you help your customers with good solutions for me it can be considered an experienced stringer.
     
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  9. pvw_tf

    pvw_tf Rookie

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    I have seen people driving a car for 20 or more years and still can not drive.

    The same with stringing. Seen stringers who done 1000 and 1000 of rackets and just do a bad job. And there are the one who do way better with less rackets done.

    Still to develop enough finger speed and feeling for it you will need a certain amount of string jobs done. Further you need experience with different strings (gut, poly, multi, syn-gut), different rackets, different tensions (15 to 35 kg), bad, nasty and demanding customers. All are part of the whole lot.

    I wrote once you need a 200-300 to develop basic stringing skills.

    Peter
     
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  10. gmatheis

    gmatheis Hall of Fame

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    I've seen a guy pull 2 mains at a time, he didn't like pulling through the throat so would run the main down then back up to the head before pulling tension.

    His string jobs played fine but I doubt he was getting full tension on his stringbed that way.
     
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  11. marosmith

    marosmith Professional

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    Experience doesn't matter all too much.
     
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  12. zapvor

    zapvor Legend

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    its tough to. mostly you save time via pulling and weaving. you just have to work your way up in speed.
     
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  13. anubis

    anubis Hall of Fame

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    I've strung a little over 100 racquets and I still consider myself to be a beginner.
     
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  14. abllee2198

    abllee2198 Rookie

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    Are you experienced?

    HP: I think after a few hundred frames you can certainly call yourself experienced. What I think you're really asking is how good are you and that can't be measured by a racquet count. There are stringers that have been stringing for years and still lack consistency.

    If you really want to gauge how good you are, I think you need to take the USRSA certified and MRT rating tests. These are benchmark tests that will give you a guideline relative other stringers. After that, then you'll know how good you are and so will everyone else.

    Albert Lee
    Former Pro Tour Stringer
     
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  15. diredesire

    diredesire Super Moderator

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    I'd also mention getting very comfortable working with your clamps. I'd say clamps are one of the main reasons for inconsistency (tension). It cascades a little bit when you fiddle with clamps -- it causes variance in the duration a string is under tension.

    There's other opportunities, like the (most) obvious -- weaving speed. Pulling, as zap said is an obvious place when we're talking about "cutting corners," you can yank fast and skip fanning, but it's terrible for the string.

    I'd also say examining your process and seeing where you waste time (rotating the frame, tangles, dropping string ends, etc). All waste a few second here or there, and when you're doing many, many string ends through a job (several dozen), the seconds start adding up into minutes.
     
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  16. Wikky

    Wikky Rookie

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    From what you said I would consider you an experience stringer. I would suggest taking the MRT as others have stated. Depending on where you take it it's actually rather easy to pass and saying you're a "master racquet technician" easily gets you $100 worth of business (the cost of the test).
     
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  17. zapvor

    zapvor Legend

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    did you take the test wikky?
     
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  18. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

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    Your prices are a little off

    http://www.racquettech.com/certification/application.html
     
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  19. Wikky

    Wikky Rookie

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    Yes I took it twice actually. Once my sophomore year but didn't have grommets and then finished it this past year right before I graduated. I'm moving down to Atlanta now and it's probably a big reason I got the job.

    Sorry for not mentioning the actual cost my mistake. At my school it only costs 100 since the Executive Director of the USRSA Dave Bone is a Ferris grad.

    Like I said though its well worth the cost. But I have to admit in my opinion the test doesn't necessarily make you a Master Racquet technician, at least I certainly don't think that I should have passed it with my ability my sophomore year.
     
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  20. zapvor

    zapvor Legend

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    congrats man! big tennis scene down there. always enjoy your posts
     
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  21. Wikky

    Wikky Rookie

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    Thanks zap, I've learned a lot of my craft from you and several other posters here so you're all to thank.

    To the OP if you have any questions on how to sign up for the MRT or getting any of the study materials please let me know and i'll send them over to you.
     
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  22. zapvor

    zapvor Legend

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    haha i dont contribute much here. its the other way around i learnd from you here
     
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  23. Perrotoro

    Perrotoro New User

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    CS vs. MRT

    Are you speaking of MRT or CS, Last I looked at the USRSA, about a year ago, there were way more requirements than just a written test to get CS cetrtified and more for MRT. THere was hands-on requriements at distant locations - (at least in the south). Possibly more than one visit involved. Did I miiss soemthing?
     
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  24. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    When I first started stringing for FTC Sports, the head stringer told me it takes 2,000 to be considered an expert stringer.
    I am proud of the fact I strung the entire sets of rackets for the WilsonInternationalTeam in 1976 after my second year of stringing, maybe 1,000 rackets.
    RichardStockton, RaulRameriz, and BrianGottfried's. I strung 4 of MikeCahill's rackets also.
     
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  25. Fuji

    Fuji Legend

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    For me, I can tell who strings my rackets out of the guys I work with. The two that I enjoy are both what I would consider pro-level stringers. Both have strung in excess 5k frames in their stringing career, and have strung for ITF events and ATP players. The biggest difference is the consistent quality from them. If I get 3-4 frames strung by either of these guys, they play identical. If I string my own frames (I'm a novice stringer at best) I can feel the difference.

    These guys speeds also amaze me though, standard for them is sub 20 regardless of the frame.

    -Fuji
     
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  26. Chotobaka

    Chotobaka Hall of Fame

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    Experience is a funny thing. Whether experience itself actually has value is often dependent upon how one learned a skill in the first place and whether they continue to grow and evolve.

    There is such a thing as "20 years of 1 years experience". And, just like playing tennis, if learned incorrectly repetition just reinforces flawed technique and bad habits.
     
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  27. Topspin101

    Topspin101 Rookie

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    I started a year ago and just completed my 100th racquet. The most important thing to master is consistency! I picked that up early from this site. Speed means nothing to the customer. He wants to be dialed in and get the same results every time he hands you a frame. I have a teaching pro that went to Nick B.'s academy for 8 years. He breaks strings every 2 or 3 weeks. He just leaves his racquets inside my gate with a note saying "same as usual". Consistency should be your mantra!
     
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  28. struggle

    struggle Hall of Fame

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    if you've used lots of tools in the past, worked with your hands, have some common sense.....it takes little time to become a competent stringer.

    "experienced" is very subjective.

    edit: having said that (i was stringing on an old Court and Slope/K-mate in the 80's for jr/highschool, my start at the "craft")
    I have learned alot of great tips and ideas right here on this forum as i got back after it a few years ago. good stuff,
    some i love and some i laugh at.

    go get 'em.
     
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2013
    #28
  29. zapvor

    zapvor Legend

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    what about 3300 a year;)
     
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  30. oest10

    oest10 Semi-Pro

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    You must be Superman :)
     
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  31. Fuji

    Fuji Legend

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    Hahaha! That's too much! :razz:

    -Fuji
     
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  32. zapvor

    zapvor Legend

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    actually......thats counting 1 place. my total year end will be close to 3500. so thats about 7000 in just last 2 years.
     
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  33. Rjtennis

    Rjtennis Hall of Fame

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    I agree. IMO it depends on if the person learned properly, is attentive to detail and is concerned with quality work. I know a guy who has strung 1,000's of rackets and knows what he is doing, but speed is more important to him then quality. He can string a racket super quick, but takes shortcuts that effect quality.

    I think I do a good job stringing, but I'm by no means any sort of expert like some of the people on these boards.
     
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2013
    #33

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