How many years did it take for you to get the forehand right? and I mean right!!

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by Golden Retriever, Dec 3, 2006.

  1. Golden Retriever

    Golden Retriever Hall of Fame

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    It took me five years to get my forehand really cranking. My forehand used to be my weaker side, no winners but a lot of UEs from that side. Now the pieces have finally come together and my forehand has become a weapon capable of hitting winners. There is still a lot of fine tunings to be made but at least I have finally seen the light. How many years did it take for you to "see the light"??
     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2006
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  2. ceejay

    ceejay Semi-Pro

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    I've always been able to hit winners on my forehand.

    However, when I first started they were overshadowed with sheer amount of unforced errors. From starting until being reasonably happy with my forehand, maybe a year or two... but then Tennis was the third racquet sport I had played.
     
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  3. andyroddick's mojo

    andyroddick's mojo Professional

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    haha, i'm still walking. I've gotten to the point where my forehand can be decently reliable, with decent pace, but I need to work on placement so I can hit more winners as well as move my opponent around the court.
     
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  4. patrick922

    patrick922 Semi-Pro

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    im a solid 4.0 player and my forehand was my best wing and my weapon but for some reason my forehand disappeared and now im trying to get it back.

    i think it is because a lot of people have figured out that my forehand is stronger and my backhand is weaker so they targeted that. and i think the reason why my backhand is stronger now is because i hit more with that side because my opponents hit towards the backhand side.

    now a days i tend to runaround to hit a backhand instead of a forehand.... but iam trying to get my forehand back and hope it comes back from its vacation.

    but i think i have figured it out..... i have tried to shorten out my backswing or loop on the forehand and i think that is what is hurting me... so i am going to go back to my old way of hitting my old loopy forehand
     
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  5. Tour 90

    Tour 90 Semi-Pro

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    Took me about 3 years to get mine dialed in the way I really wanted it.
     
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  6. Venetian

    Venetian Professional

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    About 5 years.
     
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  7. EliteNinja

    EliteNinja Semi-Pro

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    5 years and my forehand is an UE-generator.
    I hit more winners off my 1hbh.
     
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  8. Mick

    Mick Legend

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    it depends on how well your opponent plays. If he is a level below you or the same level, your forehand will feel "right" when you hit it but if he is a level above, his delivery will cause you to mis-time your forehand, hit it late, etc... so my answer is never, if you play someone who is better than you .
     
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  9. J-man

    J-man Hall of Fame

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    I've always had that natural talent for a forehand. But it took me awhile until I was able to get it where it was consistant, with spin, depth, power.
     
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  10. TonyB

    TonyB Hall of Fame

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    I think everyone would agree that it takes literally years to get a stroke "just right." That is, *IF* they can get it right. Most people don't even get that far.

    I'm making some changes to my strokes to try to expand my range in my backhand and add some more precision to my volleys. I expect that it will take the better part of a year or two to get them to where I want them.

    As amazing as it sounds, it does take a long time for strokes to come around. Even looking at the pros, they are continually improving their shots. You always see some pros that have improved some specific aspect of their game from one season to the next. And these guys are working on their game FULL TIME WITH PAID TRAINERS AND COACHES!

    If you're like me, and you play like once or twice a week, just imagine how long it will take to correct inaccuracies in your strokes.
     
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  11. dewey2110

    dewey2110 Rookie

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    It only took me 1 year. My forehand has always been my biggest weapon.
     
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  12. Mahboob Khan

    Mahboob Khan Hall of Fame

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    Well, if you have the right talent, if you are getting right type of coaching, right amount of coaching, it takes about 10 to 12 years -- 10,000 to 12,000 hours of meaningful practice -- to become world champion. And to get the Forehand or any Hand right, I would say 3 to 5 years, because it depends on other factors such as the player's ability to move from one level to another, and the experience elements!
     
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  13. Rafa's best friend

    Rafa's best friend Banned

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    My Forehand has been always a very natural stroke, Noone taught me how to hit it, it just came to me Naturally, on the other hand my backhand took me 2 years to get right.
     
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  14. Mick

    Mick Legend

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    Yep and there are variations to how you hit the forehand such as topspin forehand, flat forehand, slice forehand, etc... To master them all within 5 years is quite a feat .
     
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  15. Golden Retriever

    Golden Retriever Hall of Fame

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    Even when you are playing someone better than you, you still get some sitters from time to time. So the question is how many years would it take for your forehand to be able to put away (or at least punish) a sitter?
     
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  16. Mick

    Mick Legend

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    ok. that's different. I don't think you would need 5 years to learn how put away a sitter. It depends on the individual. For me, I would say between 2 to 3 years :)
     
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  17. zzzbrianxxx

    zzzbrianxxx Rookie

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    3 years of high school tennis.
     
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  18. Kobble

    Kobble Hall of Fame

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    About five years. I struggled the first 4 years and 10 months, then I changed my philosophy, bought a camcorder, and BAM(it showed up). With a good coach and a camcorder it would have been more like two years.
     
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  19. Solat

    Solat Professional

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    17 years and i'm not there yet, always room for improvement
     
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  20. nViATi

    nViATi Hall of Fame

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    Depends on who you're playing, a club player or a high level varsity or college player
     
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  21. Mahboob Khan

    Mahboob Khan Hall of Fame

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    That's right. Once you have the basic drive forehand, then you work on the other elements as indicated by Mick.
     
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  22. federer_nadal

    federer_nadal Professional

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    I have a very strange way of learning, i learn my forehand with the usual continental grip, racquet back to the fence, finish over shoulder. That was from early coaching. From then on i pretty much read these boards and watched alot of tennis players and just transformed my forehand into somewhat of a modern stroke. I can usually change my forehand from a flat classical drive to a modern heavily topspinned (like that word huh??) shot within 2 shots. I have a good memory and things feel natural to me. I can hit them both with as good as consistancy as each other. Maybe this is wrong, maybe i should pick one style and stick with it.

    It is funny though because recently i changed to a 2h backhand from a 1 hander (last week) now my 2 hander is a shot that i can consistantly rely on in rallies on big points.
     
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  23. shindemac

    shindemac Hall of Fame

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    Don't know. I've been playing many years now on and off. The problem is I don't play enough like when I was a kid with tons of free time, so it doesn't matter how good I get it because I would just lose it.
     
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  24. Cindysphinx

    Cindysphinx G.O.A.T.

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    I'm *so* glad to see this thread.

    I stank it up last night with my forehand. It just got worse and worse throughout the match. Almost all of my errors were forehand errors. When I saw a serve coming to my backhand, I would sigh in relief before I even hit the ball because I was so glad I wouldn't have the chance to make yet another forehand error.

    Then in lesson today, we worked on it some more. I think the problem was the failure to point the LH at the ball. The pro explained it as a balance element. I had never thought of it quite that way, and once I started using the LH for balance the way a tightrope walker does, my forehand was instantly better.

    Also, I have a difficult time looking the ball into the racquet on the forehand side during a match. I have no problem with this on the backhand side.

    So, to answer the question, I've been working *seriously* on my forehand for six months, and it's still not there yet.
     
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  25. Supernatural_Serve

    Supernatural_Serve Professional

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    I developed my forehand naturally. It was a given in year 1, but limited.

    Then, it got fixed in lessons over 6 months which meant it had to be broken before refixed. This was a difficult 1 year process.

    Then, a few years later it got enhanced when I learned to take the ball early on the rise and step into the court, employing more compact swings. This screwed up the timing of my natural forehand but allowed me to handle much heavier balls, steal time, and use the opponents pace

    Then, it got better becoming my major weapon (especially returning serve) when I got my lower body and footwork mastered.

    Then, a few years later facing more and more heavy top spin from opponents, I began employing semi-western/western grips to add it to my toolbox of forehand skills, which required some steps backwards before I could hit with those grips and generate depth consistently.

    Until you reach a very high level of tennis, in my opinion the forehand is always a work in progress and it always should be or you will hit a "wall" and find improving difficult.
     
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  26. ball_basher

    ball_basher New User

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    After switching from eastern to semi-western forehand, it took me nearly 2 years for my forehand stroke to become that good. These days, it's reliable and fast with plenty of topspin. Good consistency too.
     
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  27. krprunitennis2

    krprunitennis2 Professional

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    1 year against 2.5-3.5s
     
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  28. tennis_hand

    tennis_hand Hall of Fame

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    1 year for me, but then i lost it in 2 weeks without touching the racket and motivation to play the game. Then when i pick up the racket, i am like a 1.0. lol.
     
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  29. bcsax123

    bcsax123 Semi-Pro

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    My forehand has been my biggest weapon for a long time, and I could start hitting winners without many errors in 3 years. My backhand sucked. Then i watched how Safin hit his backhand and now my 2hbh is almost as powerful, but more consistent than my forehand.
     
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  30. righty

    righty New User

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    Less than a week! I had a natural low to high motion having played table tennis before.

    As a comparison, the serve took three years, and it was more than five years before I could hit anything but a slice on my backhand.
     
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  31. Punisha

    Punisha Professional

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    Ive been playing tennis for 2 years and my forehand is my main weapon... then my serve. I can hit winners of forehand drive volleys quite easily... I set all my points up with it!
     
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  32. fastdunn

    fastdunn Legend

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    I think I know what you're refering to. When I started out playing tennis,
    FH was the eastest stroke, instantly becoming bread-n-butter shot.
    But as my skill level goes up, FH became the hardest stroke to get it right.

    FH is a motion with many degree of freedom unlike 1HBH which is more
    restricted swing. This means there are more things that can go wrong
    but sometimes it can be harder to figure out what went wrong. Sometimes
    you can get away with many glitches in FH since you can still play
    game OK.

    There are some world class athletes struggle with FH(of course at the
    different level): Lubjicic, Safin and Venus Williams, to name a few.
    In fact, they are not likely to turn things around and make theirs strong weapons.

    Sometimes, I think maybe I'm born with weaker FH. For example,
    my my left footing is less secure than right foot's. Also my neck
    rotates less wide to the left side. And my upper body's
    pulling power is much bigger than pushing power (consequently
    my backhand is very strong...)
     
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2006
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  33. BlackSheep

    BlackSheep Rookie

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    It’s still a bit of a mystery to me.
     
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  34. dvikasmishra

    dvikasmishra New User

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    Same here. It took less than a week for me to hit a flat or top spin forehand.
    I started with n code 90 and I could hit my forehand anywhere if not on run.
    Short balls, slice, high balls, pace never gave any problems.

    Serve took a year ( flat and top spin serve). I am still not consistent with slice serve.

    Backhand still sucks big time. From ping pong, I have this habit of taking the ball in front of body, without shoulder rotation.

    Feet movement is aweful but I am working on it.

    Volleys are O.K and I like to backup my forehand by rushing to net.

    I have been playing tennis for a year and a half and I am around 3.5.http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/images/smilies/icon_wink.gif
    ;)
     
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  35. Zets147

    Zets147 Banned

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    I hope my FH is still there when I play tomorrow. I've been sick and studying (kinda) for finals for 7 days now. Tomorrow is the 8th day without tennis, but I shall soon fix that :D

    I needed work on short balls when I last practiced lol
     
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  36. skuludo

    skuludo Professional

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    I needed to lose to takeuchi. That only took 1 day. At that point there were two possibilites I could make my forehand work. Use my blue string RD Ti-70 (I can't explain why, but I was able to hit the forehand that didn't work the entire match against him.) <-- Only applied on that day with the same form.

    My other option was to change my grip very slightly. <--The one I chose.
     
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  37. 1171

    1171 Rookie

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    30 years on my forehand. Now it is very good. Fluid, slow to fast, can put entire body into it. It is just smooth now.

    Yah, it took me 30 years. Modeled after Federer in 6 months.
     
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  38. mucat

    mucat Hall of Fame

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    It reallly depends on who you are playing with. If you are playing with somene a level or more above you. You "Right" FH will look average at best.
     
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  39. tennis_hand

    tennis_hand Hall of Fame

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    sure? I feel I play better against better players, but tank against weak players, because they are so weak to destroy the momentum and the game becomes boring because they don't reply my good shots.
     
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  40. renhoek

    renhoek New User

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    About 5 years. I had no control with a cheap aluminum OS on the first 2 years. Switching to a 90 sq. fixed my FH. Now the PS85 is totally sweet on FH and getting good on 1HBH.
     
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  41. Dashbarr

    Dashbarr Rookie

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    1 year to really get power and actual placement.
    another year to tune it.

    i didnt start trying till 11.
     
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  42. mucat

    mucat Hall of Fame

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    Try play a match against someone 1 to 2 level above your level, preferable around 4.5-5.5+, see how good you will feel.
     
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