How much do the top machines cost?

Discussion in 'Stringing Techniques / Stringing Machines' started by racquetdynamics, Dec 30, 2006.

  1. racquetdynamics

    racquetdynamics New User

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    Does anyone know what the retail price is for the top machines from Babolat, Tecnifibre, etc.?
     
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  2. varuscelli

    varuscelli Professional

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    The contributor on this one said it was around $8000.

    http://www.photostringer.com/gosen_GM2000EX_01.htm

    I'm trying to figure out which car to sell so I can get one. :p

    RSI Magazines lists (US funds) the Babolat Sensor Expert around $8500. Tecnifibre TF-8000 around $7500. Yonex ES5 around $6500. Gamma 8500 Els around $3000. Prince 3000 around $3000. Pacific D-X around $3000. Silent Partner Opus around $2800. Alpha Equinox around $2500. SAM ProMaster around $2500.

    On the other hand, the top Klipper USA machine (440-CS) is listed at $495. Yeah! My kind of pricing.

    Those are from the Racquet Sports Industry on-line magazine Stringing Machine Selection Guide 2006.
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2006
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  3. me is bored

    me is bored Semi-Pro

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    ya the first couple are little bit over price lol (like 1k over) but still in short theyre really expensive lol ;)
     
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  4. Swissv2

    Swissv2 Hall of Fame

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    That.....




    is a beautiful machine :grin:
     
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  5. varuscelli

    varuscelli Professional

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    Yeah, I can picture it as a centerpiece in the main room of my house. You know, rather than the coffee table. I mean, who needs a "table" to put "coffee" on in the middle of the room anyway? :p
     
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  6. OrangeOne

    OrangeOne Legend

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    Yeah, but then people would put coffee on the stringer :(.

    I think you need both the table, AND the stringer, and a sign to make it very clear which is which :)
     
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  7. Richard Parnell

    Richard Parnell Rookie

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    I have two machines,
    The one I keep in the shop is the babolat 5502. This was the top of the range Babolat machine before the sensor range (the expert "borrowed" quite a few features). The retail of the machine at the time was 16,000 euros which translates to around the 21,000 dollars. It is faster than any other machine,measures the string, calculates the strings elasticity and auto checks the calibration.There is also a client database with cc for each client that brings up history etc.
    I have a 3502 which I use for tournaments which is also an excellent machine, I believe it would be around the 14,000 dollars and also has electromagnetic clamps and the usual Babolat quality for top end machines.
    The most expensive machine in the world is definitely the 5502. But there again there is only one Rolls Royce. Once handled never forgotten.
    Stringing is really a pleasure and I count my lucky stars,
    All the best,
    Richard
     
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  8. varuscelli

    varuscelli Professional

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    Yes, the better idea would be get rid of the television and keep both the stringing machine and the coffee table. ;)
     
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  9. varuscelli

    varuscelli Professional

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    Hi, Richard...

    I'm sure many of us would love it if you'd like to share some photos of the 5502 and 3502 on the photostringer website. I know that I would. Just let me know what I've got to do to convince you to send in a few images. :)

    I'd be very happy to post some if you would have either the time or inclination to e-mail me some digital photos.

    As a side note, those prices seem similar to what you'd have to spend about 10 years ago if you wanted one of the "new" state-of-the-art digital cameras back then like many of the photojournalists used (either the Kodak DCS Canon or Nikon models). For those, you needed about $25,000 in US funds to walk out the door with one (or to have it delivered to via the company Rolls Royce... ;) ) I think the prices dropped to a more "reasonable" $10-12,000 right before the next generation of more publicly available digital cameras came out.

    Those 1.5 megapixel cameras weighed in the neighborhood of 4 pounds (body only, no lens) so they were quite a handful compared to today's digitals, it seems. I never owned one, though.

    They looked something like this:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
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  10. D Wilson

    D Wilson Guest

    2000 is good
     
    #10

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