How Much Warp is Bad?

Discussion in 'Classic Racquet Talk' started by max, May 12, 2013.

  1. max

    max Hall of Fame

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    I'm looking at a woodie I've got, warped about 3 mm or 4 mm from one side to the other.

    Any notion of the extent to which this might signally affect performance?
     
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  2. joe sch

    joe sch Hall of Fame

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    Depends on the user ...

    If selling a racket, any warpage needs to be disclosed.

    Some buyers may be willing to accept some warpage depending on the racket. For example, its not a big deal on a 1880 flat top that will hang on the wall.

    For playing, it depends on what your willing to accept. I can usually notice a small amount of warp depending on which side Im hitting the racket and would not want to play a match with a warped racket, if I had another that was straight and the same quality.
     
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  3. tennytive

    tennytive Semi-Pro

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    I have an old Arthur Ashe Competition that is slightly bowed in the head. Playable, but annoying.

    Was wondering if I strung only the mains and left in in the stringer if that would do anything to straighten it back up again? It's not wood, fiberglass and aluminum composite.

    I tried weight over the warp, but it didn't take.
     
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  4. gavna

    gavna Hall of Fame

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    Honestly any warp is bad......if messing around or just collecting
    no real biggie. But playing with a warped frame is a biggie - the curve and spooning will effect play no matter how slight.
     
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  5. Tamiya

    Tamiya Semi-Pro

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    woodies should be stored in a clamp, that's what they made clamps for
     
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  6. coachrick

    coachrick Hall of Fame

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    Heck, back in the '70s, we re-strung rackets that wouldn't lie flat on the machine! More of a comfort/budget issue for some folks. ;)

    The chances of 'un-warping' a wood or sandwich-style frame to any real effect is virtually nil. Metal can be re-shaped; but a wood or laminated frame isn't likely to hold the new orientation for any length of time.

    As a junior with little money, I played with warped rackets from time to time, with a decided preference toward a forward warp on the backhand and a 'trailing' warp on the forehand. :) Could go either way with the dreaded 'twist' warp!
     
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  7. gavna

    gavna Hall of Fame

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    Soooo glad we never had to do that...........once we saw a warp - boom in the trash bucket - had a collection after 10 yrs that was like 40 frames spooning.


    As for stringing - at the shop I worked at in New York in HS we would absolutely not restring warped frames. In college and after at the two shops we would only restring after we had an ok from the customer.

    I saw more than once restrung warped frames come off the machine and "pop" -
     
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  8. Sanglier

    Sanglier Rookie

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    Interesting. Isn't that essentially what the handle orientation on the Battistone racquet allows you to do, only in a predictable and much more exaggerated manner? From all the videos I've seen, the only instance where the brothers don't use a 'trailing warp' grip on the forehand side is when serving, or perhaps when chasing down a ball that had gone past them, otherwise their 'preference' for their forehand/ backhand grip is exactly the same as yours. Maybe you should have patented your 'preference' at the time and had someone make an elegantly hooked frame and called it "WarpSpeed" or somesuch, then you might have become a junior with lots of money, and we would be here today discussing how WarpSpeed had changed the game of tennis, and how unfair it was for some guy named Coachrick to corner the crooked racket market...

    As for warpages that result in a lopsided hoop, one can always tell oneself that the frame is more 'ergonomic' that way :)
     
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  9. yonexRx32

    yonexRx32 Rookie

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    An experiment to try

    If the racket has no significant value (collectible, sentimental, otherwise)... cut strings, place racket in a metal clamp..then place the head over a humidifier (hot vapor) or a pan with hot water and leave it there for a couple of hours.. Tighten up the clamp and repeat. Remove and let dry for a couple of days, with the clamp on.
    Remove clamp and check that the racket is straight. Give it a coating of a polyurethane paint.

    Disclaimer:
    Don't blame me if it looks worse in the end.
     
    Last edited: May 12, 2013
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  10. gavna

    gavna Hall of Fame

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    Just to put that idea to bed........you CANNOT unwarp a frame.

    I played from 1968 - 1983 with wood frames ( as most all did then) and worked in 3 shops and for two major racquet manufacturers - thousands have tried and some claimed to have "fixed" a warped frame.....NEVER EVER saw one that did.

    That's the reason the press was a std item on every wood frame made -
     
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  11. joe sch

    joe sch Hall of Fame

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    Very true and many head presses actually warp rackets since they are not straight and/or apply uneven amounts of pressure on the different sides or top/bottom. Metal presses are more likely to stay true but I would not use any of them on a straight woody
     
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  12. coachrick

    coachrick Hall of Fame

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    ;) :) ;)

    Shoulda-WOODa-coulda...I missed my calling! With my warped sense of humor, I would(wood) have been a natural!

    BTW, the forward warp was for cross-court backhands and the trailing warp was for Chrissie Evert-style forehand approach shots ;) ...the inside-out slider!
     
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  13. Hannah19

    Hannah19 Professional

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    Woodies should be stored at room temperature and medium humidity. A press is then not needed. Storing a woodie in a press and expose it to different temps and humidities, the press will warp as much as the frame does.
     
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  14. Hannah19

    Hannah19 Professional

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    Not entirely true...you can unwarp a frame but than the structural integrity will be compromised. I "unwarped" a Maxply McEnroe by putting the head up to the shoulders in hot water. Left it for about an hour and then straightened it in a vice between a couple of boards. Worked like a charm but restringing it will almost certainly destroy the frame.
     
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  15. retrowagen

    retrowagen Hall of Fame

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    From what I recall in the original Star Trek series, Warp 8 was considered a dangerous maximum. :lol:
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2013
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  16. gavna

    gavna Hall of Fame

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    Thought it was closer to warp 10 before the ship started shaking and Kirk
    looked worried?:):)
     
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  17. Sanglier

    Sanglier Rookie

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    That's because the Lacoste style dampener on Enterprise's butt was frequency-matched through warp 9 only :)
     
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  18. retrowagen

    retrowagen Hall of Fame

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    I'm actually rather surprised we haven't seen Dilithium crystal technology in some of the more recent tennis gear (of questionable marketing gimmickry).

    Speaking of questionable marketing gimmickry, I'd like to take credit for coining a new term today, noun, meaning "a 'technological advance' or specification that is supposedly new, but is actually is only marketing repackaging of prior technology, or a detail promising technologial advancement or improvement that does nothing new or better:" technilogy. :-?
     
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  19. joe sch

    joe sch Hall of Fame

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    Like your coinage of "technilogy"
    Does not take a techknow to recognize technull ;)
     
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  20. frinton

    frinton Semi-Pro

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    If in doubt check with Mr. Sulu and for sure Scottie :)
    sorry, I don't know anything about warped rackets that I could contribute :(
     
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  21. max

    max Hall of Fame

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    I like the neologism: very apt in our times.

    You should come up for a word for the product that gets improved, but which really didn't need the improvement.
     
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  22. Tamiya

    Tamiya Semi-Pro

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    aka "mousetrap" ? :)
     
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  23. Sanglier

    Sanglier Rookie

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    I thought about "improverished" right away, but this illegitimate creation has already been claimed by people who wish to tell certain comedians to quit improv. What a waste!

    It's like trying to name a company or product these days, all the short and non-awful names and web addresses are taken, even made-up names that only approximate their English original! The web has made it paradoxically easier to propagate neologisms while simultaneously more difficult to claim them.

    I would like to see what Retro can do with this one too. 'Technilogy' is indeed great. Best of all, no one has used it intentionally yet, according to first page google results. :)
     
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  24. retrowagen

    retrowagen Hall of Fame

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    I’d suggest “inproved.” It certainly sounds like a malaprop, and looks like a typographical blunder, but in English, the prefix, “in,” suggests the opposite of what follows (i.e., inefficient, inexperienced, indestructible)...

    ...as in, "This racquet is new and inproved; resigned with the latest in technilogy!"

    (and , for a good read, I commend to each of you Ambrose Bierce's The Devil's Dictionary.)
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2013
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  25. onehandbh

    onehandbh Hall of Fame

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    JK prostaff

    From reading this thread, I'm still not sure if it is possible to fix a warped wood racquet. I never had problems with my JK prostaff until I moved to a humid area. I just noticed the warpage when I played with it last week. (unpredictable trajectories).

    I think it is maybe a couple mm off.

    Is it salvagable? Should I just avoid playing with any wood racquets if I live in a humid place?

    I won't have access to a wooden x-frame clamp thing for another couple months. Not even sure it can fix it.
     
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