How to equalize stringbeds among different size frames

Discussion in 'Strings' started by Maui19, Mar 24, 2011.

  1. Maui19

    Maui19 Hall of Fame

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    I am currently playing a 93 sq in frame. My backup stick is 105 sq in. (Both are 16 x 19). I am playing both at around 55 lbs tension. The 93 is fairly low powered, and the 105 is a cannon. I like the way the 93 plays right now--although I may drop the tension to 52 or so.

    I'm guessing I need to bump up the tension on the 105 a lot. But how much? Would 60 do it?

    I intend to play the 93 in matches, but may need to switch to the 105 if I break a string during play.

    Whaddya think?
     
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  2. fuzz nation

    fuzz nation Legend

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    That's a pretty significant difference between those head sizes. You get longer individual lengths of string from on side of the hoop to the other, so that makes for an inherently more lively string bed with more displacement (trampoline effect) at contact, given the same string at the same tension in both frames.

    There's really no exact formula to come up with the extra tension you need in the 105", mostly due to the fact that it's a different racquet with its own weight, flex, and balance. All those things contribute to a different response, but there's even the subjective issue of feel. You may have to sample a couple of tensions in that larger racquet to get the feedback that feels right for you.

    I pretty much use either 16 or 17 gauge synthetic gut in my racquets. If I was looking for acceptable feel in a 105" frame and my mids were running at 55 lbs., I'd probably go up to 62-63 lbs. for my first try at the larger string bed. I have a 100" racquet that I like to string at 65 lbs., but I also enjoy a couple of mids strung in the mid-to-high 50's. If you're using more resilient string like multifiber, you can expect to need even a couple extra pounds of tension to firm things up where you want them.

    That first attempt at a higher tension is no more than a guess which should give you some reference point. It might be right the first time, but it may take another try to get right. If that larger racquet has a recommended tension range listed on it, you might try it strung right in the middle of that range or maybe two pounds under the max.
     
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  3. esgee48

    esgee48 Hall of Fame

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    #3
  4. Maui19

    Maui19 Hall of Fame

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    Thank you fuzz and esgee. Those are very helpful posts!
     
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  5. nickarnold2000

    nickarnold2000 Hall of Fame

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    Get a 2nd identical racket - it's most definitely worth the investment(even if it's used).
     
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  6. Maui19

    Maui19 Hall of Fame

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    I will once I am sure this new racquet is a keeper. Until then, I need a reasonable backup.
     
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  7. fuzz nation

    fuzz nation Legend

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    Ideally, it's probably smart to get two of the same racquet once you've settled in on a favorite. Actually, I'd say that three can be the best number, just because that leaves you with two frames to keep you in business when one pops and needs restringing. Blah-blah-blah...

    The thing for me is that I actually reeeeeeally love a few different racquets and one may feel night-and-day better for me on a given day than another. It's been a big help for me to keep a couple of different racquets in my bag because of this. No crime in having different frames handy is all I'm saying.

    The big issue with keeping different racquets in your bag (my bag, etc.) is going through the process of getting the sting setups right for you. That gives you the response you like along with the confidence you need on the courts, even though you've got a significantly different piece of gear in your hand.
     
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  8. ethebull

    ethebull Rookie

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    You might also consider using a stiffer, lower powered stringset in the larger frame. Tension is not the only way to address differences. I would certainly check gross weight and center of balance and get busy with some lead tape as needed.
     
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  9. djNEiGht

    djNEiGht Professional

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    Im sorta In the same boat.

    Mizuno is a 90 16x19 10 pts HL 12.8g 61 flex.
    NCode Ntour is a 95 16x20 6 pts HL 12g 59 flex.
    BB London is a 98 16x19 8 pts HL 12.1g 63 flex.

    Choice of string as of late is x1 but haven't tried it in the Mizuno yet. Im thinking of going all x1 or nrg2. I currently have my London at 60# and the Ncode at 58#. Was thinking of going down another two pounds for more in the Mizuno.
     
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