How to improve your strokes against slow incoming balls

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by kevhen, Apr 16, 2004.

  1. kevhen

    kevhen Hall of Fame

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    I just realized last night why my forehand is so good at hitting slow moving balls while my backhand is not. I always hit forehands when starting practice rallies. I am going to try to start with backhands from now on until my backhand gets solid at stationary balls. It is solid when incoming balls are moving fast already, but struggles with incoming slow slice or slow topspin. Hope this helps others as well as myself!
     
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  2. linli101

    linli101 New User

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    Timing, timing is everything for backhand drive.
     
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  3. finchy

    finchy Professional

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    well first off, what kind of backhand do you have? one handed? two handed? one hand slice?

    for me, one handed is great for slow moving balls. then again, my racquets are kinda powerful so they do most of the work, but its a good feeling when u hit a slow moving ball with a clean strong one handed backhand.

    i dont use my two-handed anymore because im trying to develop my one hand. my 2 handed one is a more flat ball that i use for balls that are above my chest.
     
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  4. Stitch626

    Stitch626 Rookie

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    This has nothing to do with the subject... but nothing feels better than ripping a one hander on a sitter. NOTHING!!!! =P
     
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  5. Cypo

    Cypo Rookie

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    Stitch - Especially down the line !

    It's the other way round for me - I get screwed-up on the forehand side when the ball's off pace ( I tend to over run them). An instructor gave me the tip of pointing at the ball with my left hand and it's helped a lot.
     
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  6. bryangoh

    bryangoh Guest

    Hit through the ball

    The problem with returning a ball that lacks pace is that you have to generate it yourself. An easy way to generate pace is to make sure that you hit through the ball. Lots of times we lose a lot of pace when we concentrate too much on generating spin. The slow ball is an easy ball if you take your time, address the ball properly and hit through the ball with a good follow through. When I get a slow ball, I think of myself as a coach feeding a ball to a trainee. Picture that and you will 'send' the ball along with a bit more pace.

    You can add more pop later but this image of 'sending' the ball along will go a long way.
     
    #6
  7. kevhen

    kevhen Hall of Fame

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    Yes, I have a two hand topspinner that struggles more with sitters than my slice forehand. I think always starting practice balls on the backhand side is going to help me develop the proper stroke against balls with no pace. Do topspin shots struggle more against lack of pace? It seems like maybe it's easier to slice slow balls for me, but maybe I just need to practice more.
     
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