how to maximize the warm-up for a gameplan?

Discussion in 'Adult League & Tournament Talk' started by Rozroz, Apr 22, 2013.

  1. Rozroz

    Rozroz Legend

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    i just started playing this amateur "tourny". first time official matches for me.
    (yes i know i "Rank" myself as 4.5 but it's Israel so i try to suggest my level somehow, so please except that for now ;) )

    my first match was suspected to be a loss by the warm up, but the opponent had a mental problem and just missed out most of his shots so i won 6-1 6-0.

    i'm reading the Gilbert book ATM, but still i'de like a suggestion of a best way to use the warm up for a game strategy. my take:

    -study the opponent's best "comfortable" shots that he likes to hit and note to avoid letting him use those as much as possible.

    -study the serves as well as i can.

    -try to spot the weak spots and go full power on them.

    anything else? (the match is in 3 hours)

    thanks.
     
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  2. tennis tom

    tennis tom Hall of Fame

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    Sounds like you got it down pretty well, that's plenty to be observing for in ten minutes of warm-up if you get that much. I'm just trying to find my own shots usually. Hit the ball steady in the warm-up and you'l get into their heads right-off because they'll think you're better--I've only "lost" one warm-up--but many matches.

    Brad's book is good, he's got a shop near me, almost ran his dad down once while he was walking his dog in the middle of the street.

    Good luck in your match, it's probably over by now. Where you playing, at the clay club in R-A on the river?
     
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  3. Rozroz

    Rozroz Legend

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    thanks. the match is 30 min from now.
    you do realize i'm located in Israel, right?
    where is R-A by the river? ;)
    i'll let you know how it went.
     
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  4. IA-SteveB

    IA-SteveB Professional

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    You do have it down pretty well. I use warmup to try to notice a few things but I don't take it overly serious. Things I do notice are shot preferences or masking weaknesses, like taking extra steps to turn an obvious backhand into a forehand. I will keep hitting it a little farther to backhand to force a look. :)

    You may get a little bit of a look at mobility, but I don't put much stock into things I see in warmup aside from the obvious.
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2013
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  5. Cindysphinx

    Cindysphinx G.O.A.T.

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    As a doubles player . . .

    I watch to see if they have solid volley mechanics and whether they always volley short. I also notice how close they stand to net.

    I pay attention to where their warm-up serves land to help me figure out how tight to the service line to receive. It stinks to start a match on the baseline and then miss the first return because the serve is so bloody short.

    I ignore groundstrokes. I rarely see anything remarkable there.

    I pay attention to how they feed lobs to me. If they can't feed me a lob, they aren't much of a threat to lob me in the match until they prove otherwise.

    I make sure I hit some slice shots to them as they volley to see if they volley better against slice than with topspin. There seem to be a lot of people who struggle to volley slice shots.

    That's plenty!
     
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  6. tennis tom

    tennis tom Hall of Fame

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    Ramat Aviv, Yarkon River.

    G'luck!
     
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  7. Angle Queen

    Angle Queen Professional

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    Agreed with much of what Cindy said, but I'll add to this:

    I also generally ignore groundies but I do try to take note of what they'll do if a ball is hit towards their body. Do they take an easy step back and take it as a FH, actively try to run around it...to take it as a FH. Or just go with a comfortable BH.

    As for myself, I don't "show" much in warmups (esp on serve) except, I hope, some ball control. I make a point to try to feed them FHs and BHs, both at the baseline and at net, and make sure they get a decent mixture of volleys in height, placement and pace. If I've warmed them up well...I've usually gotten a good one in for myself. :)
     
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  8. Buford T Justice

    Buford T Justice Semi-Pro

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    Yes....dont be fooled by the warm up! Ive learned that lesson a number of times!

    Many a time Ive thought "this will be an easy win" and then realized "oooops! He just smoked me!"

    The way strokes "look" has very little to do with their effectiveness in rec tennis, even at advanced rec level.
     
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  9. Fuji

    Fuji Legend

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    This is a good one. It's funny since in the warm up I don't hit many backhands, people try to attack it off the bat. It's my stronger wing though, so I don't really see the need to warm it up as much as my forehand. :razz:

    -Fuji
     
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  10. Rozroz

    Rozroz Legend

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    DAMN - this guy was really stable, at least one level above me. lost 6-1 6-3.
    could you please let me rant a bit? thanks!

    well, first of all, this is not a league, just a web site tourney.
    so you are divided by the level you put when you sign up.
    well i was at the A level. (2 levels).
    if i had lowered my level one step, i was at the B level which is far less demanding i guess. that will be fixed right away :p
    so-
    the guy already practiced for an hour before i got there so he was hot.
    he didn't show me anything at the warm up besides that he was a lot more stable than me, lots of spin, excellent volley.
    now for the unfair part!
    it was obvious he started to get tired at the end of the first set.
    started to miss, etc.
    i was leading 3-2 on 2nd set.
    at the mini break he says: i gotta re-fill my water, ok?
    i said: yea (thinking he'll be quick)
    well he was away for 2-3 minutes. was obvious he needed to rest.
    when he came back i said: that should have been done between sets, you know.
    well, after that he was more stable and hold it on.

    next time on level B i'm sure i'll get a lot deeper.

    thanks for all those tips, guys!

    so tennis Tom - do you live in Tel Aviv or what? :D
     
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  11. IA-SteveB

    IA-SteveB Professional

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    Better luck next time. At least you had fun, right? That's what counts in the end.

    If that had been a USTA match and a guy took that long of a break, you can be sure someone would come here and post about it. :)
     
    #11
  12. Rozroz

    Rozroz Legend

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    hmmm.. i wouldn't call it fun ATM. when you struggle against an upper level player you just try to hang on wishing he'll do some errors. no FUN.
    i AM happy for the 6-3 that made me realize i can do some damage when focused.
     
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  13. Angle Queen

    Angle Queen Professional

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    I should have also mentioned that, in doubles, I like to "warmup" on the side opposite of what I'll be playing, i.e. warmup in the ad court if I'm going to play deuce.

    That does several things for me, the primary one being the chance to, usually, hit with the opponent I'll generally be trading groundstrokes with (albeit straight on as opposed to CC in the match). Warming up on ad also generally lets me warmup the BH a bit better since I'm not trying to abbreviate my swing on balls hit down the middle like I might when warming up on deuce (because my partner's warming up in ad). It also forces me to hit that BH over the highest part of the net and gives me the chance to try out that BH DTL that's normally not on my radar.

    And, sometimes, it will mentally mess with our opponents and, while that's not my/our plan, when it's happened, it's been nice. They're just simply not ready for my FH CC. Angled sharply. :p
     
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  14. Angle Queen

    Angle Queen Professional

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    Rant on, brother. But I wouldn't necessarily consider a -1 and -3 loss too terribly bad, especially against someone you consider a "level" higher.

    Good on you for starting the thread with a good question that many of us can/could benefit from.

    Are you still in the tourney? Or was it one and out?
     
    #14
  15. Rozroz

    Rozroz Legend

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    no i'm out. thanks for the good feedback. the experience is the major target for me now. but obviously when you play someone at your own level you can at least expect some more gameplay and opportunities to enable some tactics, also a more tight match i guess. cause i wasn't bad, i was just a level below.
    at least i made him cheat so he could rest :twisted:
     
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  16. hunterx

    hunterx New User

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    Sorry you lost, but good for you sticking in there until the end. My first year in USTA and playing line 2 singles lately has been extremely frustrating. I don't know if there are rules about it but the other teams we are playing seem to be putting their best singles player on line 2 for easier wins. These guys are serving the ball fast as heck and I don' thave experience returning them. Their topspins are incredible, I keep getting pushed back past the baseline. Many times I really, really, really want to throw my racket at the fence or smash it into the clay courts...

    But like you, I try to remind myself its good experience to see my faults so I can work on them in practice.
     
    #16
  17. Govnor

    Govnor Professional

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    Always better to play up than down, remember that - people.
     
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  18. tennis tom

    tennis tom Hall of Fame

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    I must respectfully disagree with that often quoted assumption. To improve, you should play approx. 30% with players better then you, 40% with players at your level and 40% with players at a lower level then you.
     
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  19. Fuji

    Fuji Legend

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    I'm not a mathematician but...

    -Fuji
     
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  20. OrangePower

    OrangePower Hall of Fame

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    If you're not playing 110% then you're not playing...

    :)
     
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  21. Fuji

    Fuji Legend

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    Hahahaha that is the greatest thing I've read today!

    -Fuji
     
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  22. tennis tom

    tennis tom Hall of Fame

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    YES! You get it! As for those concerned with details of earthly mathematical computations, bone-up on string theory and expand your mental universes, I did say "approximately".
     
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  23. Govnor

    Govnor Professional

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    LOL, nice.

    As to my first point about playing up rather than down, that was specifically for a match, which this thread was about. Who wants to play a match against someone you can obviously beat? If you want to practice things, do that when practicing!
     
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  24. beernutz

    beernutz Hall of Fame

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    I agree. I want to play 0% with players I can easily beat but the reality is that you play whomever the other team puts out there.

    Theoretically, I'd love to have all my matches be split 50%/50% between players much better and players at my level but that's not going to happen either.
     
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  25. tennis tom

    tennis tom Hall of Fame

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    I DO! That's how you get ranking points, prize money, fast cars, fast women and invited to the best parties. A practice match against a weaker opponent is the best way to practice shots you wouldn't be able to under the pressure of competition where your technique breaks down and reverts to whatever remains of it or jungle ball. Playing against stronger players, who take away your time, ingrains bad technique.

    For those who are mathematically grounded in earthly calculations and their calculators, here's a simplified synopsis of string theory. It will explain where I derived my "extra" 10% from. It's at the heart of winning tennis:

    http://www.ask.com/wiki/Introduction_to_M-theory?qsrc=3044

    As you see there are many practical applications to tennis such as the loop, gravity, and not to mention the 11 types of strings providing the super-gravity of slice:

    "It is the vibration of the string which determines whether it appears to be matter or energy, and every form of matter or energy is the result of the vibration of strings."--personally I like gut.
     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2013
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  26. Rozroz

    Rozroz Legend

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    totally agree with this. you should "upgrade" to confronting upper level players after you secured your handling of lesser/equal opponents.
    especially after i tasted a match vs upper level.
     
    #26
  27. Govnor

    Govnor Professional

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    Each to his own. Maybe my tennis circles are different than yours.
     
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