How to measure the sweetspot?

Discussion in 'Racquets' started by ptuananh, Jun 30, 2005.

  1. ptuananh

    ptuananh Rookie

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    I dont know how big the racket's sweetspot or sweetzone is. Anyone know how to calculate it for each frame?
     
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  2. jonas-the-ball-basher

    jonas-the-ball-basher Rookie

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    I don't think you really can.
    It's very hard to say where the sweepspot actually fades away.
     
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  3. TennsDog

    TennsDog Hall of Fame

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    Yeah, especially since the term "sweet spot" is solely based on feel, which cannot be measured.
     
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  4. Gaines Hillix

    Gaines Hillix Hall of Fame

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    Here are some facts about racquets from the TW learning center, including the sweetspot;

    Racquet Facts
    A heavier frame generates more power.
    A heavier frame vibrates less.
    A heavier frame has a larger sweetspot.
    A stiffer frame generates more power.
    A stiffer frame has a larger sweetspot.
    A stiffer frame transmits more of the shock load to the arm than a more flexible frame.
    A stiffer frame provides a more uniform ball response across the entire string plane.
    A larger frame generates more power.
    A larger frame is more resistant to twisting.
    A larger frame has a larger sweetspot.
    A longer frame generates more velocity and therefore more power.
    The string bed in a longer frame generates more spin due to increased velocity.


    Also, take a look at www.racquetresearch.com . In technical terms the sweetspot is called the center of percussion or COP. The location of the COP can be calculated. The description of this and the formula is on there.
     
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  5. cheecl

    cheecl New User

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    If a stiffer frame transmits more of the shock load to the arm than a more flexible frame, then why is it that stiffer racquets are supposed to be more arm friendly?
     
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  6. dewey4262

    dewey4262 Rookie

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    Stiffer frames are not more arm friendly, unless of course they have a dampening system of some sort.
     
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  7. Ryoma Kun

    Ryoma Kun Semi-Pro

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    wherever it feels sweet hittin the ball, it could be the frame if thats how u roll.
     
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  8. hummer23

    hummer23 Hall of Fame

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    a good way to test this is actualyl to just paint the whole racquet face iwth ink, and go out and hit with some old balls. this will show a large area where you hit, and a smaller area where the ink should be gone, which is your sweetspot. if in genreal, your shots feel pretty good,a nd dont cause too much vibrarion, you can assume that your strokes coincide with the sweetspot of teh frame, which is really all out need to know. who knows, maybe it will show you hit up too high on the stringbed or some other problem that you can correct if you know about it.
     
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  9. Gaines Hillix

    Gaines Hillix Hall of Fame

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    Stiffer racquets are not more arm friendly, for exactly the reason you noted.
     
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  10. raftermania

    raftermania Banned

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    Gaines, or TW, others; what is meant by a "larger frame"? A thicker beam or a larger head size???? I'd think that a larger head size would twist more on off-centre hits?
     
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  11. Gaines Hillix

    Gaines Hillix Hall of Fame

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    Yes, in this case larger means a bigger head size. Twistweight varies with the amount and location of weight in relation to the long axis(down the center of the frame). Twistweight increases linearly with weight but with the square of the distance from the axis. That's why wider racquets are more stable.
     
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