How to put away DTL 2HBH - Djokovic style

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by TenFanLA, Jun 12, 2014.

  1. TenFanLA

    TenFanLA Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2011
    Messages:
    2,417
    My 2HBH is reliable and I hit it with decent pace and spin. If someone hits hard, I can return or redirect with pace. However, when I get a slow, short ball I have a hard time hitting a screeching DTL winner, Djokovic style. My shot has too much topspin and doesn't really penetrate thru the court. I have no problem hitting fast paced winners off my FH. Do I need to turn my top hand to more continental/eastern grip to flatten out DTL 2HBH?
     
    #1
  2. Topspin Shot

    Topspin Shot Legend

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2009
    Messages:
    5,141
    The big DTL backhand is a great shot to have, but you can be a great player without it, if this makes sense. There's nothing wrong with chipping the ball and coming in or hitting an inside in forehand if you're more comfortable doing either of these things. Just some food for thought.
     
    #2
  3. Noltae

    Noltae Rookie

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2010
    Messages:
    203
    It's all about footwork and good spacing - its an easy shot to get all jammed up on and thus loose power..
    It is quite an energy sapping shot too - core should stay focused right through the swing path...
     
    #3
  4. martini1

    martini1 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2008
    Messages:
    3,173
    Actually it is quite easy to hit DTL flat with a 2hbh. Just don't swing from very low to high. Start just slightly below the ball and swing forward, not up. Punch thru the ball and do not hit with a very open stance. Lean into the ball and move forward as you hit. I think at first you may hit a lot of ball into the net but once you get used to it, it will be easier to hit a flat and powerful bh than fh!
     
    #4
  5. McLovin

    McLovin Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2007
    Messages:
    3,245
    I think that is the most important aspect of the shot: Lean into it. And you have to balanced when leaning, you can't be falling into it, if that makes sense.

    My DTL BH put-away is inconsistent, but a kid I hit against regularly has the shot 90% of the time (he's a 5.0 recent college grad). At my level, it is practically indefensible. The only way for me to counter it is to anticipate & cover it early, which leaves me open to any cross court shot.

    And even if I do get to it, my passing shot has to be spot on, because if not...easy volley into the open court.

    So, its a great shot to have in your bag. Even if you only have to hit it once, it will pay dividends later in the match.
     
    #5
  6. moonballs

    moonballs Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2012
    Messages:
    2,288
    If you need to generate the pace yourself, you should hit harder cross court than dtl. It os ok because the dtl shot doesn't need the same pace to get the same effect. I go cross court more often so whenever I go dtl there is good results because it is somewhat a surprise. But if I go dtl most of the time guys with good running forehand can pass or lob back.
     
    #6
  7. Maximagq

    Maximagq Banned

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2013
    Messages:
    6,554
    The key to hitting Djokovics backhand is to really step into it and have your body weight moving forward. That's the thing I really notice about Djokovics backhand. His extension and shoulder rotation is mechanically so sound
     
    #7
  8. Power Player

    Power Player Talk Tennis Guru

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2008
    Messages:
    20,200
    Location:
    On my iPhone
    No it doesn't make sense to me at all. Honestly a DTL backhand changes everything and is worth learning.

    I worked on mine for a year and it opens up the court so much. People run around their backhand for shots I can hit with far less movement. It makes the opponent's shot quality have to be a lot better when they come to my backhand side.

    I really think the DTL backhand is a game changing shot and everyone I play, the first thing I do is see if they have one. If they do not, I automatically know I can get away with so much more on that side of the court.

    When opponents rush the net, they never cover the DTL at first and expect a CC reply. Having that in your arsenal keeps people back and also makes their approach shots need to be of higher quality than they may be used to.
     
    #8
  9. Maximagq

    Maximagq Banned

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2013
    Messages:
    6,554
    The main advantage that a Djokovic has over federer and Nadal is that his backhand down the line is a much bigger weapon than theirs so he has to give up less court to create an offensive position because he doesn't need to run around his backhand as much. Djokovic is very evenly balanced on both sides, which allows him to create more offensive shots from any position.
     
    #9
  10. Power Player

    Power Player Talk Tennis Guru

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2008
    Messages:
    20,200
    Location:
    On my iPhone
    Exactly.

    I have a friend who was 5.0 rated as a junior and is now too rusty to be above a 4.0. But he still has his DTL backhand due to working on it so much as a kid, and that stroke alone keeps him in matches.
     
    #10
  11. TenFanLA

    TenFanLA Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2011
    Messages:
    2,417
    Lots of good advice here. Use footwork to create space, LEAN into the shot, rotate core, swing on a flatter path. I play against a few guys with strong FH but weaker 1HBH. They usually camp out on the ad side but when I hit a couple of good DTL BH winners, they are completely puzzled. It really changes the whole dynamics of the match.
     
    #11
  12. 5263

    5263 G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2008
    Messages:
    10,444
    I believe the key to getting this to penetrate better is the swing path. If your path is more low to high and out towards the target, then it will tend to sit up more, but if you can swing flatter, with less low to high along with being more across the body....then you can flatten out the shot more, taking it stronger thru the court. Simple version...don't get the hands and racket so far below contact on backswing and wrap the swing more to your delt instead of up and over it.
     
    #12
  13. Tyrus

    Tyrus Professional

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2008
    Messages:
    888
    Location:
    Chicago
    This won't answer your question but let me offer some perspective.

    Your topspin isn't as much of a liability as you think. My 2HBH isn't the most consistent so confidence in ripping one isn't always too high. That said if rolling it DTL is an option to set up a winner at the net then you can do that too :D
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2014
    #13
  14. widmerpool

    widmerpool Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2006
    Messages:
    326
    Location:
    Atlanta
    Be a genetically gifted, elite athlete.

    Novak does have good strokes to copy, but it's tough for rec players to mimic his timing.
     
    #14
  15. Topspin Shot

    Topspin Shot Legend

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2009
    Messages:
    5,141
    The OP is not referring to a regular DTL backhand but a "screeching" Djokovic-style DTL backhand that goes for winners. You're right that a DTL backhand is a necessary shot to have, but not necessarily the kind that can deliver multiple winners from the ground.
     
    #15
  16. Power Player

    Power Player Talk Tennis Guru

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2008
    Messages:
    20,200
    Location:
    On my iPhone
    You want to argue semantics, go ahead. I simply addressed your post that said it was "just as good to hit a chip shot and come in or a I/I FH" - No it's not. Its much better to have that DTL backhand you can finish a point with. It does not have to be hit really hard, but it needs to be hit.
     
    #16
  17. Topspin Shot

    Topspin Shot Legend

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2009
    Messages:
    5,141
    Not arguing semantics, simply answering OP's question. It's like wanting to serve aces like Sampras. It's great if you can, but there are other ways to win. And the inside in forehand can go for a winner. BTW I personally would hit the topspin backhand DTL, but my style isn't necessarily best for the OP.
     
    #17
  18. SStrikerR

    SStrikerR Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2010
    Messages:
    2,052
    Location:
    Not Fantasy Land
    He said there was "nothing wrong with" not that those options are "just as good".

    You CAN be a great player without an amazing DTL backhand. Obviously having one makes it easier, but arguing that you can't be without one is ridiculous. There's a reason why many pros camp out in their backhand corners; it's so they can hit more forehands. I don't know about you, but I'm pretty sure all pros are great players. Andy Roddick is a great example. He won a major without having a great backhand dtl. Saying that any of us "needs" to do something to be successful based off of what the pros do is stupid. We aren't pros.


    That being said...to the OP: Backhand dtl is one of my favorite shots, and it does do a lot of damage when used effectively. So you may find it worthwhile learning. Assuming your backhand technique is sound (if it isn't, then any advice given here may or may not help) then leaning into the shot are having a more horizontal swing path will help. However, one thing that is nearly as important as knowing HOW to play the shot is knowing WHEN to play it. If you rip a ball with maybe a foot of net clearance from no mans land and hit a winner, great. If you try that same shot from a step behind the baseline, you might net it. It's important to keep that in mind, especially in your situation. You want to use less spin, so by default you're lowering your chance of making the shot. Which makes your shot selection all the more important. When you're learning the shot, try not to get frustrated and think that you're doing something wrong technically whenever you miss a ball, because that may not be the case.
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2014
    #18
  19. Power Player

    Power Player Talk Tennis Guru

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2008
    Messages:
    20,200
    Location:
    On my iPhone
    You don't get it all. I never once mentioned a pro, so you immediately are off the rails on this.

    Actually go ahead and read the USTA classification of what a 4.5 player should be able to do and get back to me about what your classification of stupid is.
     
    #19
  20. Maximagq

    Maximagq Banned

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2013
    Messages:
    6,554
    Perfect example of a great player without a good backhand DTL is Rafael Nadal.
     
    #20
  21. TenFanLA

    TenFanLA Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2011
    Messages:
    2,417
    This video of Fognini helped me a lot. He gets a slow, short ball at :13. He keeps his left hand loose and at a distance until the very end and then lets go. I was able to hit a handful of DTL BH winners yesterday during a 2 hour match.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oVHNpD5HP3c
     
    #21
  22. Power Player

    Power Player Talk Tennis Guru

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2008
    Messages:
    20,200
    Location:
    On my iPhone
    Matt nailed it earlier in. The secret is the weight transfer into the ball. You have to lean into the shot.

    I have compacted my take back and am able to hit with a lot of power just from good weight transfer. This may or may not work for your stroke, but I keep my left elbow against my body more and that helps me out. No rules there, just works for how I hit.

    The other thing is the extra footwork. I shuffle a little more to get set up properly now because I know how that transfer is supposed to feel, and what position I need to be in.

    Watch Djokos feet right before the shorter put aways. You will see what I am saying there.
     
    #22
  23. bt johnson

    bt johnson Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2012
    Messages:
    245
    Location:
    ATL
    Keeping the left elbow against your body is not something you want to do.
     
    #23
  24. Power Player

    Power Player Talk Tennis Guru

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2008
    Messages:
    20,200
    Location:
    On my iPhone
    Thats not true. There are multiple ways to hit a 2hbh and starting with your elbow against your body before you swing is fine.
     
    #24
  25. Ballinbob

    Ballinbob Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2008
    Messages:
    3,327
    Location:
    colorado
    I don't risk hitting it big when I hit a DTL backhand... I prefer to loop it DTL instead of blast it because I have a tendency to hit that shot wide. Any advice on how to fix that?

    I don't have that problem with CC backhands
     
    #25
  26. bt johnson

    bt johnson Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2012
    Messages:
    245
    Location:
    ATL

    You're correct about there being multiple ways to hit a 2 hander but having your left arm pinned against your body is not ideal and is terrible advice to give out.
     
    #26
  27. bt johnson

    bt johnson Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2012
    Messages:
    245
    Location:
    ATL
    You need more extension with your left arm, assuming you're a righty.
     
    #27
  28. Power Player

    Power Player Talk Tennis Guru

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2008
    Messages:
    20,200
    Location:
    On my iPhone
    No it is not at all.

    You have your left arm against your body on the take bad and then hit as normal. It actually helps with the left arm extending out for me, and was taught to me by a coach with ATP points who realized the straight take back was not for me.

    Please refrain from telling me or anyone else what advise is terrible and what isn't.
     
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2014
    #28
  29. Power Player

    Power Player Talk Tennis Guru

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2008
    Messages:
    20,200
    Location:
    On my iPhone
    Its all about leaning into the shot. It takes a while to figure it out. The secret is in the setup. Lots of little steps so you can get your balance moving forward into the shot. Should feel like your lead shoulder is leaning into it.
     
    #29
  30. bt johnson

    bt johnson Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2012
    Messages:
    245
    Location:
    ATL
    I'm a coach and had ATP points. We were not talking about the take back anyway so why bring that up? If your left arm is pinned to the body you have less extension. You probably don't even know what extension is.... why are you a casual rec player who hits a self admitted "right hand dominant forehand" which is also incorrect even spouting off nonsense.
     
    #30
  31. Power Player

    Power Player Talk Tennis Guru

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2008
    Messages:
    20,200
    Location:
    On my iPhone
    Arent you the guy who posted video and was supposed to play 5263 but never did?

    I sincerely doubt you have atp points. You just seem like a jerk in every post you make. I need to find that video again because it was nothing impressive, in fact you looked like a rec player to me and everyone who posted in that thread. And you were also a grade A clown throughout it.

    My backhand is not even right hand dominant at all. I just start it compact. Thats it.

    Do you talk to people like this in person? Because id love to see that.

    Yeah here we go - http://youtu.be/BVIb33ZgaIk ATP points? Lol, ok man.
     
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2014
    #31
  32. SStrikerR

    SStrikerR Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2010
    Messages:
    2,052
    Location:
    Not Fantasy Land
    I'm sorry, but I'm going to have to disagree. I think that while that tip may have worked for you, the way you presented it here was horrible. In order to truly understand something, people need to know WHY. The way you presented your tip was "My coach is awesome and he told me to do this thing that helped me, so it must be good advice." Someone who doesn't know much about backhands might read that and try it and as a result won't be extending properly, thus hitting crappy backhands.

    Feel free to disagree with me, but you're wrong if you do.
     
    #32
  33. Power Player

    Power Player Talk Tennis Guru

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2008
    Messages:
    20,200
    Location:
    On my iPhone
    Ok you have it all figured out so if I disagree it doesn't matter. lol. You must be a kid, because that's just an immature response.

    The way I presented it was that I was had my backhand refined by a credible coach who is ranked in the top 400. So its not some backwoods advice.

    The other thing I said was that this very well may not work for how he hits his backhand. I never said it was absolute, you must do this, or anything else. So if that is terrible advice to you, then you must not peruse these forums very much. It was a simply idea to try out that helps with the prep on certain 2hbh styles. Mine is rather compact on the prep and then extends out through contact. It was basically an asterisks to the main point - you need to lean into the 2hander like Matt said.

    Anyway, it is valiant of you to defend all the poor readers whose backhands will be ruined by my advice. I am sure you are just as forthcoming and brave in person as well.
     
    #33
  34. Maximagq

    Maximagq Banned

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2013
    Messages:
    6,554
    If you want to put ANY ball away, you should be leaning into the court on either groundstroke.
     
    #34
  35. Power Player

    Power Player Talk Tennis Guru

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2008
    Messages:
    20,200
    Location:
    On my iPhone
    Agree. But many people do not. It is pretty stunning to see.
     
    #35
  36. GoudX

    GoudX Professional

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2012
    Messages:
    829
    Location:
    UK
    Hitting a Djokovic style DTL backhand is all about taking the ball early/shoulder height and controlling it so it lands close to the line, when the opponent hits a deep shot cross court. You don't need huge spin or power, just good control and placement which comes from striking the ball cleanly. It is often a winner as it is hit so early when the opponent is expecting a cross court shot.

    Safin on the other hand got backhand winners by hitting the ball really hard and flat from hip height near the middle of the court.
     
    #36
  37. GoudX

    GoudX Professional

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2012
    Messages:
    829
    Location:
    UK
    I have to disagree. He doesn't have a great attacking DTL backhand, but he uses it very well as a set up shot. He hits his backhand DTL as a heavy consistent shot, which coaxes opponents into hitting cross court for consistency, which goes straight to Nadal's forehand setting up one of the most dangerous inside out/in forehands the game has ever seen.

    Federer is a much better example. His dtl slice is much less effective than his cc slice ashe can't drag the opponent so short and wide, while his topspin 1hbh is too prone to missing.
     
    #37
  38. DonDiego

    DonDiego Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2012
    Messages:
    1,676
    You just wait a little bit more for the ball than for a cross-court, and make sure you follow-through towards the target. That's it. If you want it to be a ''screamer'', do the same thing you would with your cross-court ''screamer'', and apply the above.

    It's always funny to see how opponents are completely surprised when you pull out that shot, whether it's hit with a two-hander or a one-hander.
     
    #38
  39. DonDiego

    DonDiego Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2012
    Messages:
    1,676
    #39
  40. bt johnson

    bt johnson Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2012
    Messages:
    245
    Location:
    ATL
    Dude I don't have time to reply to your responses. If I saw you in person I would say " Aren't you a musician who spent years trying to copy Agassi's backhand to discover it's not a right hand dominant shot?" Now you have your left arm pinned to your side, so now you don't have a followthrough. Genius.
     
    #40
  41. Curiosity

    Curiosity Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    May 29, 2014
    Messages:
    477
    In the following I'm agreeing with Power Player that on a standard height 2HBH the upper arm has to come close to the side at the bottom of the back/down swing, but also with those who say it isn't necessary...but only not necessary if a higher line is being used on a flat swing at a high ball. Well, here goes:

    I suppose that wanting to hit a "screeching" 2HBH DTL requires being able to hit a "screeching" 2HBH in any direction. (The DTL bit is a matter of right-hand control, a grooved push out into the hit, and timing, no? But cross court, too, requires timing and a certain right-hand control/action.)

    Everybody involved in this post probably knows this, but it can't hurt to mention it (well, right up until I get flamed, laugh. Ya'll have had enough of arguing with each other. So go for me.):

    Whether he is beginning from low hands, or instead somewhat higher hands (for a higher ball he wants to hit flat), Djokovic does something that often goes completely unnoticed:

    At the depth of Djoker's obvious throw-down of the racquet head immediately before swinging forward, he very briefly achieves a straight left arm. You do notice that. Why bother? Because in that instant as the racquet head bottoms and his arm goes straight he externally rotates his left upper arm, pulls the hitting elbow through to a straight arm while doing so. The amount of ESR is small, and naturally accompanies the straightening of the arm, but that doesn't make the move unimportant.

    The telltale of the upper arm rotation, the ESR motion, is a slight movement back, not just down, of the racquet head in the very last instant of the racquet head's bottoming, a move of perhaps two or three inches, or less, but easily seen, and at the very bottom: those inches come from the final movement forward of the left elbow, which entails an extremely brief external rotation of the left upper arm. The other telltale, more difficult to observe, is his left elbow moving forward relative to his left hand at the instant of straightening. (You'll notice that external rotation is almost impossible to achieve with two hands on the grip in any way other than by reaching a straight arm for an instant just before beginning of the forward stroke. And recall, that with a straight arm, ESR and supination come as a package.)

    He IMMEDIATELY goes into internal rotation of the upper left arm as he swings out and forward. The range of this ISR is not always used up all at once, suddenly, but through the arc to the hit. The extremely brief external rotation makes possible the use of internal rotation of the left arm through the hit, which internal rotation of the upper arm, using shoulder muscles, leverages the upper body rotation. (I assume he controls the DTL angle with right-hand discipline, by pushing forward with his right hand into the hit, just as everyone else does.)

    If that extremely brief ESR move is attained at the very instant of racquet head bottoming, enabling an almost instant shift to internal rotation of the left upper arm up (or out) through the hit, leveraging upper body rotation, I'd be very surprised if you don't have enough power to hit with good speed down the line. Discuss.

    Some Djoker viewing: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UN6L0MICG1w&list=PLWD3MNWW-vJ-ffGbGjAvoVI9Y4l0TG40G

    Edit: Having just reviewed four minutes worth of Djokovic backhands, approximately never was his upper body weight moving into the court. On one BH it might have been. On all the others his weight was moving upward, slightly back, or to his left. If I were a full-time two-handed backhand guy, I'd look into that very brief ESR as the left arm goes to straight at the bottom of the throw-down, and the use of ISR as the UB rotation brings the racquet around. And if anybody tells you it isn't worth trying, investigating, I'd tell them to go jump in a lake. What the heck, it's hot weather anyway. That little bit of ESR when the elbow comes left to straighten the arm is really a mirror, constrained by the two hands thing, of what happens in the forehand.
     
    Last edited: Jun 29, 2014
    #41
  42. DonDiego

    DonDiego Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2012
    Messages:
    1,676
    Seriously... you guys are way over-analyzing this stuff.

    I've played hockey all my life and if you ask me how to shoot the puck in in the top corner, I couldn't answer. yet I can still make that shot 9 times out of 10.

    Just hit some balls, aim for that target, and you'll soon figure it out.
     
    #42
  43. Curiosity

    Curiosity Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    May 29, 2014
    Messages:
    477

    -But if I asked you how you perform a slap shot, I bet you can tell me in detail, to help me get the basic technique down. The precision, the advance to control, is something more, yes? You don't aim it, you hit it. And it goes where you want it to. Experience using good technique, I would suppose. And talent.

    Do people come here for simple non-analytic answers? Why would they bother? I thought they raised question seeking analysis, meaning accurate descriptions of what good players do, technically. Of course once we know, only the hitting remains, and asking doesn't help anymore. And there are different fine-points of technique, options. There's my sword play. Then there's Zorro's -Sgt Garcia.
     
    #43
  44. Curiosity

    Curiosity Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    May 29, 2014
    Messages:
    477
    In a friendly way, I challenge you to watch the four minutes of Djoker backhands in the following video and find even four or five in which Djoker is moving forward. He is almost always moving up, back, or to his left. His power comes from setting up his shoulders, arm, racquet, from rotation, from his shoulder and arm muscles executing, from his technique in using those attributes, I think. Not from moving his weight forward. But still, the challenge:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UN6L0MICG1w&list=PLWD3MNWW-vJ-ffGbGjAvoVI9Y4l0TG40G
     
    #44
  45. DonDiego

    DonDiego Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2012
    Messages:
    1,676
    All I'm saying is, if you want to hit that shot, thinking about all those technical details will paralyze you.
     
    #45
  46. Curiosity

    Curiosity Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    May 29, 2014
    Messages:
    477
    I completely agree with you. "The fault," if we end up with "paralysis by analysis" after hearing/watching/reading detailed technical analysis of how the experts and star players hit, "is not in our stars....but in us," that we don't take the analyses that we find true, work them into our play, groove our play, and then forget what the Caesars of the tennis world taught. Or maybe that should be the "Cassius' of the tennis world?"
     
    #46
  47. Maximagq

    Maximagq Banned

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2013
    Messages:
    6,554
    Is Djokovic trying to hit any down the line WINNERS in this video, or is he putting the ball back into play in a rally situation? I said when he GOES FOR WINNERS, he is leaning into the court on his two handed backhand.

    Three perfect examples of what I am saying.
    http://youtu.be/zlDsdMOXnHw?t=21s
    http://youtu.be/QjmLLKdWMso?t=1m42s
    http://youtu.be/7rUGxOivcwA?t=9m17s
     
    Last edited: Jun 29, 2014
    #47
  48. DarlesChickens

    DarlesChickens Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    May 20, 2013
    Messages:
    435
    From the first youtube video Maximagq posted.

    [​IMG]

    Head still
    Eyes on point of contact
    Weight transferring forward
    Finish high

    As someone mentioned it's not too different from hitting a regular stroke in terms of the key points above and the basics of tennis.

    If i'm hitting this shot I want my momentum going forward because I want to meet that ball out in front of me, side on, but out in front. You often see Djokovic finish up with his back leg coming round as his core rotates and ending up in front of that standing front foot. It can look awkward but it gives you an idea of the the processes going on as he 'steers' that ball down the line.
     
    #48
  49. Curiosity

    Curiosity Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    May 29, 2014
    Messages:
    477
    First, I though I was commenting on #7, "The key to hitting Djokovics backhand is to really step into it and have your body weight moving forward. That's the thing I really notice about Djokovics backhand. His extension and shoulder rotation is mechanically so sound."

    I enjoyed watching the three clips you linked. It's fun to see him in full rage. I suppose I strongly agree that his extension and rotation are incredible, but that I see the "stepping into it" as more "leaning his upper body into it" usually, and to me, at least, his backhand genius is that he can hit winners even when he can't get into that optimum stepping-in position.

    I really didn't catch the "goes for winners" in the next comment. I agree with you.
     
    #49
  50. TenFanLA

    TenFanLA Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2011
    Messages:
    2,417
    It was CC, not DTL but Djokovic's 2HBH return on match point against Tsonga was absolutely brilliant! Gotta be one of the best ever returns off a well placed, flat 1st serve.
     
    #50

Share This Page