How to put the kick in a topspin serve?

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by finchy, May 14, 2004.

  1. finchy

    finchy Professional

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    im still currently mastering my topspin serve. i just got it down a week ago.

    most of the time, i use a slice thats pretty slow paced, but cuts alot wide. i still need to work on the consistency. and i have no flat.

    anyways, my topspin serve has enough topspin to hop over the net at a medium paced motion. there is no kick however. it just bounces a little bit above waist high and goes straight at the opponent.

    what im trying to ask is, how do u put the bewildering bounce on the kickserve?
     
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  2. TwistServe

    TwistServe Guest

    more brush means more spin means more kick
     
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  3. finchy

    finchy Professional

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    hmm...i guess that means more tricep exercise with weights, and forearm/wrist exercises...

    i can do about 3 sets of 10 reps of 10 lbs each arm behind my back.

    what i do it get 2 10-12 lb. weights each arm, put them behind my back, in the general position you would throw something over your head, and lift them up and extend fully and bring it back to starting position.

    is this a good exercise for me?
     
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  4. finchy

    finchy Professional

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    so racquet head speed would also be a big factor too right? i would be able to brush up faster.

    would going through the ball also be better? should i jump into the court like i do on my slice?

    it also hurts my back a little when i arch my back. is there any exercises or stretches that will stop this?
     
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  5. TwistServe

    TwistServe Guest

    Not like I can hit one with a lot of kick either.. But just from what my coach says..

    Racquet head speed in a brushing motion will give you a huge kick.. Don't go through the ball to much as that will flatten out the ball..
     
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  6. finchy

    finchy Professional

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    thanks gorth. im getting a surge 5.1 so i think i would have alot of racquet head speed.

    i would have a heavy brushing motion, but i would like to add some pace to my kick serve.
     
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  7. montanatennisacademy.com

    montanatennisacademy.com New User

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    I belive this what your looking for it called a Topspin-Slice First Serve.. There it is...

    The topspin-slice serve is the most common first serve used at the intermediate and advanced levels in tennis. As the name implies, it uses a combination of topspin and slice (which on serves is sidespin, not backspin). The topspin increases the margin of error over the net, the height of the bounce, and the effective speed of the serve (by decreasing deceleration on the bounce). The slice makes the ball curve to the left (for right-handed servers). The topspin-slice serve can generally be hit with the most power of any of the spin serves. This serve is often called a "slice serve," which causes an unnecessary confusion with the pure slice serve that only has sidespin.

    Key points:

    * Stance: Stand with your right foot parallel to the baseline and your left foot pointing roughly toward the right net post.
    Grip: Use a Continental grip, holding the racquet loosely enough that it will pivot in your hand as you close your outer fingers just before meeting the ball.
    * Toss: Hold the ball in your fingertips. Start the ball and racquet in front of the midline of your body and below your waist, with your hands fairly close together. Toss by moving the ball diagonally upward and forward in a straight line toward the point of contact. Release the ball with your left hand as high as possible (could have been higher here) and reaching toward the released ball.
    * Wind-up: Start the racquet back as you begin the toss. The wind-up can add power to your serve, but its contribution is secondary to a set of more essential factors. The full, classic wind-up is no longer considered necessarily best for everyone. Some of the most powerful servers in tennis use a much-abbreviated wind-up, and a few very good servers find themselves more comfortable using no wind-up at all. Most players can use a wind-up without compromising other factors, and as long as you don't come to a complete stop just before swinging up at the ball, you will probably deliver a harder serve than you would without a wind-up.
    * Swing: The key to a powerful service swing that doesn't strain your arm is to translate the power from the upward and forward thrust of your legs and the uncoiling of your trunk into an upward whipping motion of a loose arm. Particularly important are a loose wrist and a full bending of the elbow. Don't try deliberately to "snap your wrist" on the serve. If your wrist is loose and the rest of your swing is sound, your wrist will whip forward at exactly the right moment. A deliberate snap out of sync with the rest of the swing can injure your arm. Failing to bend your elbow fully will diminish your power and eventually wear out your shoulder.
    * Point of contact: Meet the ball at the full upward extension of your reach, 1-2 feet to your right, and 1-2 feet in front of yourself, as measured by where your head is at the time of contact. Where you toss the ball will be influenced by how much you lean forward and how much you jump upward before swinging.
    * Striking the ball: Strike the ball diagonally upward and to the right, from its center toward what would be 1:30 on its face if it were a clock. The upward part of this racquet path creates topspin; the rightward part, slice.
    * Follow-through: Follow through to the left side of your body (for right-handers). The forward and upward thrust of your legs and the uncoiling of your trunk at the beginning of this service motion should result in your naturally stepping into the court and roughly facing the left sideline after contact.



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  8. TwistServe

    TwistServe Guest

    I read that at http://tennis.about.com/cs/yourgame/a/servetsslicevid.htm

    I don't think it's the "bewildering" bounce the original poster is talking about.. He's talking about a kick serve that bounces/kicks wide on an ad serve. This serve is also known as a twist serve and requires tons of angled topspin.
     
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  9. montanatennisacademy.com

    montanatennisacademy.com New User

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    I see what you saying there.. but the topspin - slice is what I think he thinking about bounce to left or to right or it go back.. The kick server also can do but you need to but a slice on it. but there both simiar to what he talking about.








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  10. Anonymous

    Anonymous Professional

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    use a sampras grip, hit diagonally up through the ball, aim to hit it at the top part of your strings
     
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  11. sanitarium

    sanitarium Rookie

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    I have a huge kick serve, well around here anyway. I can tell you how I do it, and it seems your interested in the mechanics of it and exercises, i'll give you a little rundown.

    Tricep exercises are huge, obviously, but maybe try lower back / leg stretches.

    Work on strengthening your abdominals, quads, triceps.

    Put your toss above your head or slightly forward (couple inches)

    Use lots of leg bend, get down really low then spring into the ball with your legs and your back snapping forward at the same time. The tricep/wrist exercises will help in head speed. If you get the timing correct you can get a big kick.

    Stretches, Exercises, Practice!
     
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  12. finchy

    finchy Professional

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    thanks for all the help u guys.
     
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  13. finchy

    finchy Professional

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    i did my serve alot more today and i love my topspin serve soo much.

    i still dont have the kick i want though. that may be because i use a crappy triad 3.0 hammer. i want to sell it to anyone btw. its still in fairly good condition. i cant get the racquet head speed i want. i get tons of control though because its strung at 62 lbs. with sensation.
     
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  14. Robert Jones

    Robert Jones Rookie

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    Even with the proper technique your raquet and strings can reduce your spin. Heavier headed raquets will deflect less on contact and bite into the ball more than the same swing with a light raquet. Some strings give more spin that others. Change the strings and add some lead tape to the head and try some serves.
     
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  15. finchy

    finchy Professional

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    actually, i just got my new surge strung today but i havent played with it much.

    i heard its a "game improvement" racquet. that and since i want to play with alot of topspin, and just spin in general, its headlight, allowing me to swing faster.

    so if i swung faster during a serve, wouldnt it have more spin? btw, i still need to work on technique. :p
     
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