How to teach tennis

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by Username_, Apr 4, 2014.

  1. Username_

    Username_ New User

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2012
    Messages:
    77
    How do you teach someone who has only ever played tennis once in her life?
    Talk her through it non-technically, show her, feed her balls, go through the motion with her?

    She is really content on learning but I have no clue how to teach her and the best I can do is hit her super slow shots. Any recommendations?
     
    #1
  2. tennis_balla

    tennis_balla Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2006
    Messages:
    3,666
    Location:
    Here and There
    Hand feeds, stand close to her. Even use drop feeds if necessary. Establish the contact point first, very short backswing and full follow through. Get her to feel where she needs to make contact with the ball, and to make contact dead centre that is the most important. Backswing is least important at this stage. Check Youtube for videos, there will be lots.
     
    #2
  3. 10s talk

    10s talk Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2007
    Messages:
    566
    KISS

    Keep it Simple Stupid........... no offense intended

    less information is better
     
    #3
  4. Ash_Smith

    Ash_Smith Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2005
    Messages:
    3,866
    Location:
    A green and pleasant land
    OP's topic is something i have dedicated my life to trying to figure out. In the last two years I have massively changed my approach and developed my philosophy and no doubt it will change again in the future
     
    #4
  5. Sir Shankalot

    Sir Shankalot Rookie

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2011
    Messages:
    262
    Location:
    Taunton, United Kingdom
    Out of interest, what is your current thinking on this? My friend has asked me to help out his wife, who is just beginning and seems keen to learn the sport. I'm happy to help but like the OP I have no clue where to begin. The basic choice seems to be between:

    1. Hand feeding a lot of balls to forehand and backhand and just look for a couple of fundamentals at the start, i.e. keeping the head still and hitting the ball in the middle of the strings. We can start working on other stuff like low to high swings, keeping the plane the same etc once she has got that down. Or do I...
    2. Get straight into the FYB style FH and BH progressions, building the foundations of a fundamentally sound stroke right from day 1.
     
    #5
  6. Ash_Smith

    Ash_Smith Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2005
    Messages:
    3,866
    Location:
    A green and pleasant land
    ^^^ I don't see that your points 1 and 2 are exclusive of each other!

    I think if i were working with beginners again, my technical approach would still be to build forward from the contact point into the extension and then to build a loading phase (preparation) after that. The contact is still the most critical element of the swing, so mastery of that first is essential in my book - The RPT have the best set of teaching progressions for this in my opinion, but the MTM progressions are actually very good for getting the early basics in place (awaits **** storm)! RPT uses 5 teaching progressions to build up the groundies, MTM is not dissimilar.

    When working with elite athletes (my day job), i now work in breaking the stroke into 2 phases; loading phase and unloading phase and work through the mechanics in those phases.
     
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2014
    #6
  7. Sir Shankalot

    Sir Shankalot Rookie

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2011
    Messages:
    262
    Location:
    Taunton, United Kingdom
    ^^

    Thanks for that. Are the progressions you mention similar to the ones on FYB? Like you say, they start with contact and follow through and work backwards. Makes a lot of sense.

    I think I will have my work cut out with this lady. I have seen her hit and, on her FH, her stroke consists of bending the wrist back to make a backswing and then flexing it to make a forward motion. Not only is it a recipe for inconsistency but also an injury waiting to happen. I think this muscle memory comes from playing squash but I'm not sure. She obviously needs to start again from scratch.
     
    #7
  8. Lukhas

    Lukhas Legend

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2013
    Messages:
    6,443
    Location:
    France
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SUdTxXkecr8
    I find that "being a model of good play" is a good idea. Avoid complicated words, show her technically good strokes slowly, hand feed her and she will most likely pick it up. We learn a lot by imitating; we "just" have to avoid imitating bad technique. As well as overly long takebacks.
    I knew a guy who at the first lesson for a student would simply take a bucket of balls, give it to the student, put him/her on the baseline and ask him/her to hit forehands. The student takes a ball, position his racquet relatively low, drops the ball in front of his front foot slightly towards the side s/he holds the racquet, let the ball bounce once and hit. Again and again until it works. When he watches this, he asks the student to make the necessary technical adjustments if needed.
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2014
    #8
  9. Topspin Shot

    Topspin Shot Legend

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2009
    Messages:
    5,028
    Definitely build the contact zone first. If you focus on loading/unloading, she won't be able to hit a consistent ball and will probably not want to play. Tennis is a lot more fun when you can rally.
     
    #9
  10. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2005
    Messages:
    34,789
    Find the ball.
    Feel the ball.
    Finish over the shoulder.
     
    #10
  11. vicp

    vicp New User

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2006
    Messages:
    55
    Hey sureshs - did you finally become a convert? In any case, sureshs is completely right - the 3 Fs.

    Find the ball - like you would do if you were to catch it - easy drill is an easy toss to the student and have them catch it on the right side (for right-hander) somewhere near the hip. This will get the student to watch the ball all the way

    Feel the ball - bring racquet relatively slowly up to the ball as is to stroke (not slap) it - good drill is to bring your open palm or racquet up to the ball as if to catch or trap it. One can "feel" the contact if you catch (in "find") or push/stroke as in the next step ("finish").

    Finish - over the shoulder - just before or at ball contact, swing the racquet up (low to high) and to the right (for right-handed) brushing and pushing (not slapping) the ball over the net - like a windshield wiper (WW) or like painting a rainbow - and continue to finish with the back of your hand by your left ear - good drill is to do the "feel the ball" in step 2 and push (again - not slap or hit) the ball back over the net ending up with the back of your right hand (again for right handed) by the left ear.

    With this method you can usually get a person to rally the ball back and forth within an hour or so. For a beginner, the progression usually starts by using the hand/palm, then progressing to a choked up racquet before gripping one normally.

    Have fun - this really works!

    You can see plenty of FREE videos of this online by searching for Oscar Wegner and his Modern Tennis Methodology (MTM) of tennis instruction. Oscar coined the 3 F approach.
     
    #11
  12. 5263

    5263 G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2008
    Messages:
    10,398
    Can you give us the jist of where you are and were before on this? thanks
     
    #12
  13. Ash_Smith

    Ash_Smith Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2005
    Messages:
    3,866
    Location:
    A green and pleasant land
    ^^^ Would be too much to explain in a simple post as it's been a long term evolution with a great acceleration over the last couple of years (as I've been involved in some incredible coach development programmes).

    Headline summary:
    Greater emphasis on being athlete centred (development of emotional intelligence, athlete ownership, increased facilitation - less directive)
    Greater emphasis on creating the optimal environment for training skill acquisition (deliberate/distributed/variable practice as opposed to mass/blocked practice)
    Greater emphasis on skill development through controlling the environment (constraints led approach - accelerates long term skill acquisition).

    There are many more facets and nuances to it, but those are the most major revisions.
     
    #13
  14. vicp

    vicp New User

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2006
    Messages:
    55
    Just re-read my post and corrected what I posted incorrectly - wish TW would let you edit.

     
    #14
  15. CoachingMastery

    CoachingMastery Professional

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2008
    Messages:
    1,077
    Location:
    Utah
    The answer to the original post is to first understand what does the student HOPE to achieve in tennis.

    If the answer is they want to see how far they can take the sport, then long term progressions with emphasis on grips, stroke patterns and footwork coupled with developing rhythm, hand-eye coordination, and spin association.

    If the answer is they just want to play for fun, enjoy it from the aspect of recreational fun with minimal emphasis on more long-term development, then the teaching elements will be on simple 'gravity-reliant' swing patterns with emphasis on what others here have said; find and finish as well as learning the feelings associated with proper contact points and generally developing a repeatable swing pattern.

    Nearly anyone can develop basic tennis patterns associated with trial and error, aim, and timing to the point they can learn to get a ball over the net.

    More advanced patterns usually require developing grips, strokes and footwork patterns that are initially more uncomfortable, for most beginners.

    HOWEVER: I'll postscript these comments by also adding that no one knows if a particular student, at some point, decides they "get the bug" and want to take tennis much further. I've seen ALL ages move from a recreational approach to the game to wanting to play more competitive. Thus, I tend to error on the side of teaching students more advanced methods in a fun and active way, so they don't have to relearn such aspects later in life if this goal is indeed desirable.

    Too many students were taught ineffective methods and thus, those who later wanted to get better were stuck with having to 'relearn' many aspects of the game...to the frustration that they found it very difficult to override their beginning methodology.
     
    #15
  16. Avles

    Avles Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2009
    Messages:
    1,505
    Location:
    The Peak of Good Living
    It will when you get more posts. I think the number might be 50?
     
    #16
  17. vicp

    vicp New User

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2006
    Messages:
    55
    With all due respect:

    That may be tough as many times we don't even know what we want to achieve as we endeavor to do something.

    This again may be symptomatic of what is really wrong with most tennis instruction, i.e., "not seeing the forest for the trees." With any complex task, such as playing a musical instrument, flying a plane, skiing, tennis, cave diving, martial arts, etc., overemphasis or paying too much attention to details to the detriment of the general situation (awareness) is counterproductive and can be dangerous.

    Not really true - the find, feel, and finish elements with "learning the feelings associated with proper contact points and generally developing a repeatable swing pattern" is applicable to ALL levels of tennis, from the rank beginner to the accomplished pro. That is the "Forest".

    True, but with properly presented checkpoints like find, feel and finish the whole process is efficiently optimized and precludes many bad habits.

    This is complete nonsense. The best techniques (strokes, grips, footwork) are actually quite natural - the way the body operates most efficiently (biomechanically). If these are presented in this way, there should not be much to unlearn later on.

    Great, except it is easy to teach correctly from the very beginning and the "more advanced methods" should really be refinements of the foundational basics.

    Completely correct - that is why it is important to avoid ineffective methods from the very beginning. Find, feel and finish are foundational and true for all levels. Many of the other traditional methods - bring the racquet back, hit through the ball, left/right foot forward, etc. are not and typically need to be re-learned, making meaningful progress difficult at best. Is this what you mean by "advanced patterns usually require developing grips, strokes and footwork patterns that are initially more uncomfortable, for most beginners"?

    There should be no need to override "beginning methodology" if that methodology is foundationally and biomechanically correct.
     
    #17
  18. tennis_balla

    tennis_balla Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2006
    Messages:
    3,666
    Location:
    Here and There
    Oh man, another one of these guys?
     
    #18
  19. Ash_Smith

    Ash_Smith Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2005
    Messages:
    3,866
    Location:
    A green and pleasant land
    ^^^ Yup! Sad thing is the MTM stuff has a good base for newbies, but the constant claims about how it is equally applicable at an elite level is where things go awry.
     
    #19
  20. tennis_balla

    tennis_balla Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2006
    Messages:
    3,666
    Location:
    Here and There
    I'm still waiting for a coach on the WTA or ATP tour and no Bjorn Borg 20+ years ago doesn't count on this one.
     
    #20
  21. Topspin Shot

    Topspin Shot Legend

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2009
    Messages:
    5,028
    It seems to be so.
     
    #21
  22. ProgressoR

    ProgressoR Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2010
    Messages:
    2,005
    Location:
    No Man's Land
    There's room for everyone on TTW

    Actually, no... I take that back.
     
    #22
  23. vicp

    vicp New User

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2006
    Messages:
    55
    Ya betcha!

    Ah-yup - it sure looks that way!

    Hey Dudes (you in the peanut gallery) - you all need to get a clue. MTM simply synthesizes the way the better pros play. MTM-based coaching has produced great results in Spain, South America, Russia, etc. American, that is, traditional style coaching has produced didly squat in the last 10 - 20 years, except maybe the Williams sisters and they were coached by their father using Wegner's (MTM) DVDs.

    In fact, I really don't care what you think or how you play - if you had tried it you might have found out that it works. You know the saying:
    born in it___
    live in it___
    die in it___

    What you do with your game is up to you - but you should let others try it and decide for themselves.

    Have you tried it and what do you consider your level? I am about 4.0 plus, but do not play very many matches (to advance in ratings). I have worked with traditional coaching most of my life (used to be a PTR instructor) and have discovered MTM not too long ago - AND it has allowed me and my son (20 yr old fast rising 4/4.5 player) to make tremendous leaps in tennis ability. Read some of the testimonials of 5.0 and 6.0 players that credit MTM with their rise in ability and ratings.

    In any case, one should try it - if it doesn't work fine - move on (or join the TT peanut gallery), if it does work- WATCH OUT!!
     
    #23
  24. Topspin Shot

    Topspin Shot Legend

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2009
    Messages:
    5,028
    Lol. Ash is one of the top coaches in Britain. So...you and your 4.0-4.5 level son are living proof MTM is the GOAT philosophy? "Traditional coaching" has produced nothing in the last 20 years? MTM has? And there are only two options, "traditional" and MTM? Again, lol. The sad thing is I actually like MTM for what it has to offer; it's people like you who make it look bad.
     
    #24
  25. vicp

    vicp New User

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2006
    Messages:
    55
    Are you sad because you LIKE MTM?? - maybe therapy, or if that doesn't work, some prescribed pharmaceuticals ...

    Actually, the really sad thing is - that you are quite spiteful and vindictive ("...it's people like you ...") which only shows that you feel threatened and truly do not have a clue!

    Maybe we should get "all the respected coaches" together and let them have it out with water pistols and cream pies - while in their underwear - and see who remains the emperor!!
     
    #25
  26. psv255

    psv255 Professional

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2011
    Messages:
    963
    Location:
    NY
    ^ I don't get it, why is only tennis stuck in modern when everything else is postmodern and contemporary? Bring on PTM and CTM!
    (Spielberg didn't bring back ET for nothing)
     
    #26
  27. Topspin Shot

    Topspin Shot Legend

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2009
    Messages:
    5,028
    I am sad because of the way you have made MTM look bad. And I don't feel threatened at all; I have no agenda on here.
     
    #27
  28. vicp

    vicp New User

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2006
    Messages:
    55
    Huh? Maybe you should be the MTM spokesman. I am sure you can make it look better.

    The empty can does make the loudest noise. In any case, this banter is useless and becoming tedious - I need to learn to not wrestle with pigs. You both get dirty, but the pig likes it - Ciao
     
    #28
  29. Ash_Smith

    Ash_Smith Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2005
    Messages:
    3,866
    Location:
    A green and pleasant land
    Yes, I have tried it, I have done some of the MTI coaching certifications over here, it's a good system for getting people quickly playing the the game of tennis, it doesn't translate to producing elite level players, but it may help refocus those who already have elite biomechanics and are losing focus.

    For a system which emphasises "natural" play its handling of the serve is overly fussy in my opinion and its approach to footwork is overly simplistic once you go beyond a recreational level, but it does have many good points as I have said before.

    As for my level, it is no longer relevant as I no longer compete, but I was playing I was a uk 3.1' which is around 5.5-6.0 in ntrp terms according to the ITN conversion chart
     
    #29
  30. tennis_balla

    tennis_balla Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2006
    Messages:
    3,666
    Location:
    Here and There
    Pot meet kettle.
     
    #30
  31. Sir Shankalot

    Sir Shankalot Rookie

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2011
    Messages:
    262
    Location:
    Taunton, United Kingdom
    Thanks, vicp, for derailing what was shaping up to be an interesting thread about how to teach beginners and trying to start a MTM vs Whatever flame war. This is of no interest to most people. What's more I don't see the need to be so gratuitously insulting to some of the nicest and politest posters on this board.
     
    #31
  32. vicp

    vicp New User

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2006
    Messages:
    55
    Ash - I apologize if I impugned your tennis ability or knowledge. It was probably part of my reaction to the "peanut gallery" of sniping idiots found on this and other forums.

    I do agree that MTM is very good for getting people to play tennis very quickly and it does help refocus better players - it certainly did for me. MTM certainly provides a much better framework for this than PTR (I was a PTR instructor) and probably also the USPTA. The problem with PTR and USPTA instructing or coaching standards, if you can call them that, is that they focus on a lot that is useless, convoluted, hard to remember, and once learned, usually must be unlearned because the "standards" change or because of differences in individual instructor presentations/interpretations of these standards. I have gone through this with the PSIA (Professional Ski Instructors of America), the skiing equivalent to the PTR or USPTA - I was a ski instructor for many years. The stuff that PSIA attempted to teach (don't know if they have changed - probably not that much) is pure garbage that does not work to produce efficient skiers able to evolve/improve, rather produces weekend hacks with very terminal skills and is not the way the better skiers ski. I feel that this is probably the way that most of these sanctioning sports bodies operate. The organization is formed, some rules or guidelines are formulated, then the organization fights to maintain itself and the status quo by adhering to wrong/outdated methods while attacking anything that threatens its existence. This is where MTM is like a breath of fresh air - it provides an easy and fun way for beginners to learn, does re-focus better players, and sweeps away a ton of garbage promulgated by the PTR/USPTA.

    As far as elite players - I agree - that is a whole different story. While MTM may not offer much in this regard (I don't know yet - haven't gotten into that aspect of MTM yet), certainly the PTR and USPTA do not offer them anything at all. To my understanding, elite players typically work one on one with certain coaches on specific aspects of their game. Hopefully they are past a general methodology at this point. Like you said, at least MTM does help one refocus - that in itself is very useful even at the higher levels of tennis where things do become more complex. In my opinion, this complexity at lower levels (beginner/intermediate) is an attempt by these organization to convince people of their relevance and does nothing but confuse the students and leave them with a lot of bad habits that need correcting in the future. I've seen it in skiing and I see it in tennis.

    I do thank you for your thoughtful response and apologize again if I read you wrong. I suspect that we agree on many things.
     
    #32
  33. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2005
    Messages:
    34,789
    That is the problem. While your points about teaching beginners may be correct, it is difficult to take a coach seriously if he is/was not at least a proven 4.5 in terms of actual NTRP play, or equivalent, like a former college player. I know about Richard Williams and Nick Bollitierri and others, but they are exceptions and we don't know the real circumstances, like how much actual stroke coaching they did. I always have the nagging feeling that has this guy ever actually hit a high level shot and can he do it at all, teaching or no teaching?

    I sometimes had the same thoughts about my son's teachers in high school. I know that many AP teachers are just people who have been trained to teach AP. But since the whole "system" is geared towards that, it doesn't matter and students come out OK at the end. Moreover, it is free (well, sort of). But if I was paying for a private school, I would not like AP Biology taught by an English lit major.
     
    #33
  34. Ash_Smith

    Ash_Smith Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2005
    Messages:
    3,866
    Location:
    A green and pleasant land
    You're too kind :D
     
    #34
  35. tennis_balla

    tennis_balla Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2006
    Messages:
    3,666
    Location:
    Here and There
    They made a movie about Ash, except they changed it from tennis to karate.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2014
    #35
  36. Topspin Shot

    Topspin Shot Legend

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2009
    Messages:
    5,028
    ^^^They made a money out of Ash? Come on, even Hollywood isn't that bad. :)
     
    #36
  37. tennis_balla

    tennis_balla Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2006
    Messages:
    3,666
    Location:
    Here and There
    ^$%@%# Safari and autocorrect!
     
    #37
  38. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2005
    Messages:
    34,789
    How do you know that?
     
    #38
  39. Topspin Shot

    Topspin Shot Legend

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2009
    Messages:
    5,028
    #39
  40. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2005
    Messages:
    34,789
    I know that. I have already seen that and also his Linked In page. I did not see where you got the info that he is one of top UK coaches.
     
    #40
  41. JohnYandell

    JohnYandell Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2004
    Messages:
    1,665
    To Address the Original Question:

    Learning sports is a visual and kinesthetic process. Words are necessary but only effective when they can be internalized non-verbally. There is a translation that has to happen.

    This is why using imagery of key stroke positions as models, and then having players physically replicate them, visualize them, and connect them is very powerful.

    This approach also incorporates high speed video feedback. The process is one of successive approximation. There is probably no such thing as a perfect model--that's too rigid--but using key imagery serves as a guide that allows players to absorb information directly and create mental pictures/feelings. As they get closer to the model elements the stroke becomes effective and automatic.
     
    #41
  42. spun_out

    spun_out Rookie

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2006
    Messages:
    215
    I learned my strokes by watching Agassi play via VCR, but after I got the basics down, words have been so much more helpful than images. For me, visualization cues are key to learning precisely because image can't describe feel and words can. At least for me, visual check points/models lead me to give myself verbal cues, and verbal suggestions (not commands) lead me to visualize my stroke.
     
    #42
  43. JohnYandell

    JohnYandell Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2004
    Messages:
    1,665
    SO,

    I'd agree. A key word can flash thru your mind with the image. The two are associated deeply in the body because they correlate with actual, precise physical motion.

    It's when you start talking to yourself in technical/analytic sentences that you get paralysis.
     
    #43
  44. 5263

    5263 G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2008
    Messages:
    10,398
    #44
  45. Chotobaka

    Chotobaka Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    May 19, 2012
    Messages:
    2,437

    + 1,000. I love how overly simplistic mantras of tennis coaching theory are so easily digested and regurgitated by people like this. Like putting a loaded gun in the hands of a child.
     
    #45
  46. vicp

    vicp New User

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2006
    Messages:
    55
    Hey - nothing like another personal (... people like this ...) attack from one of the "peanut gallery" droids.

    How's that workin' for ya?? - feel any better? - I would if I "regurgitated" +1000 times.

    Hint: Try discussing some of the ideas presented, that is, if that isn't that above your level - you might actually learn something and then wouldn't have to "regurgitate" so many times!
     
    #46
  47. 5263

    5263 G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2008
    Messages:
    10,398
    And on the flip side don't you just love the knee jerk judgement of those who want to put others in a neat little box without knowing them or their level of training.
     
    #47
  48. Ash_Smith

    Ash_Smith Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2005
    Messages:
    3,866
    Location:
    A green and pleasant land
    Not sure that tells us anything (or even if the intention was for it to attempt to tell us anything) - you can teach an ATP style forehand to any age (within reason) and to either sex - the issue for me is will it be effective when it matters and will she change it to a more WTA style as she grows and develops through the age groups?
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2014
    #48
  49. dennis10is

    dennis10is Banned

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2005
    Messages:
    2,033
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    If you have no clue how to teach her, what make you think that get advice from people, most of whom are not qualified to teach, will be beneficial to her?

    Why don't you suggest she gets qualified coaching or you pay for her lessons.
     
    #49
  50. 5263

    5263 G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2008
    Messages:
    10,398
    Maybe he realizes that quite a few good coaches have posted in his thread and several of us on the forum have raised and coached several of our kids in tennis for years very successfully. :)

    but welcome back and where have you been?
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2014
    #50

Share This Page