How to tell if poly strings are dead?

Discussion in 'Strings' started by loeuf, Apr 10, 2013.

  1. loeuf

    loeuf New User

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    Hi,

    I'm wondering if somebody could tell me how to recognize dead poly strings. I have a full bed of 4G, and the strings have started to move a lot. There is some notching, but not much. I probably got 10-15 hours on them.

    -- Nike
     
    #1
  2. struggle

    struggle Hall of Fame

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    they are dead.
     
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  3. anubis

    anubis Hall of Fame

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    its best to use poly strings for anywhere between 8 to 12 hours and then cut them out. Don't even worry about how to tell when they die. They will be dead long before you think you "notice" that they're dead.
     
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  4. bluetrain4

    bluetrain4 Legend

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    IF you use them enough, you'll be able to tell due to how they feel. It's subjective and will depend on which poly string you're using.

    A lot of polys, for me, start to feel rubbery, which I hate. The initial crispness is gone. But, some polys, like RPM, while not retaining it's initial feeling (what string ever does) maintain an "ok" feeling for much longer.

    We've had all these syn gut threads recently, and I'll have to say that the one characteristic of even the most basic syn gut (like Prince) is that, for the most part, the crispness remains for much longer, sometimes even until the strings break. Yes, tension is lost over time, but then it just becomes crisp at a lower tension.
     
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2013
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  5. tyu1314

    tyu1314 Semi-Pro

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    Your arm will tell you when its dead.:) I think its almost dead or already dead when the main string stop snap back to its original place.
     
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  6. corners

    corners Legend

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    When they stop snapping back. In other words, when the mains start getting stuck out of line.

    When this happens you are no longer getting the extra spin that is the chief virtue of copoly strings. In addition, when the main strings slide sideways and snapback dwell time is prolonged, which reduces shock. When the strings start getting stuck out of line it means you are no longer getting this "cushioning" effect.

    When they get stuck out of line you're essentially playing with a very stiff syngut rather than with copoly. Cut 'em out. Or you can try lubing them.
     
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  7. Squidward

    Squidward Rookie

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    I have a client that I string for that REFUSES to cut out Any String until it breaks! I've had him go 3 months with poly and not restring. This from a 4.0/4.5 that plays an average of 15-20 hrs a week.

    Sad really....
     
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  8. willkho

    willkho New User

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    wow...
    What sort of string is that? 20 hours a week for 3 months under 4.5's hand?
    It should gone within 2 weeks or even less I suppose???
     
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  9. The Meat

    The Meat Hall of Fame

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    What sort of poly is he using that lasts 3 months without killing his arm?
     
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  10. Squidward

    Squidward Rookie

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    He's pretty much tried everything out there. He usually brings me a string (most of the time poly) and say's "Here, Put this in...".

    Right now it's RPM 18 @ 45 lbs in his Pure Storms. Last string job was in March.
     
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  11. roman40

    roman40 Rookie

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    I think all you have to do is try two same rackets strung with poly at the same tension, one with 2hrs of play on it, and the other with 16+hrs. Basically, after some time, poly's lose resiliency and tension, so not only will the racket feel stiffer, it will also become more difficult to control your shots, including pace/spin/placement. Of course, you won't notice the issue if you don't have control in the first place. Up until last year, I used to go between string jobs much longer than I should have, and often attributed my lack of consistency and control to improper technique and lack of practice. While that was partially true, I noticed a major improvement when I begun to re-string more often. I didn't have to continuously adjust to my strings anymore and could focus on other issues.
     
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  12. martini1

    martini1 Hall of Fame

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    Here are some of my exp -
    - less pocketing feeling at impact
    - ball generates less spin, more balls are sailing just out when you know normally they'd be in.
    - you pull the strings off position and they do not snack back, especially the middle mains.
    - you arm feels the extra vibrations
     
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  13. joe sch

    joe sch Hall of Fame

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    Agree with most of the observations on how to know when its time to restring poly setups.

    Its even more difficult to restring gut/poly hybrids. For example, I play a pc600 18x20 VS (main 48lb) /hurricane (X 46lb) and this hybrid setup for sure loses its great play after about 5 hours but because of the VS gut, will still play very nice for 20..30 hours. Its very hard to restring since I can play full gut setups till they break and they play great till they break, with very little tension loss. If I was playing for money or rankings, then I will play a new setup and just keep the older rackets for non-serious practice, like hitting with my daughter or giving lessons.
     
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  14. tlm

    tlm Legend

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    Sorry but once they will not snap back they are way past dead. Waiting that long is a great way to ruin your arm, and no lube is going to change that.
     
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  15. eidolonshinobi

    eidolonshinobi Professional

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    Your strings don't return to place and your elbow cries. That's when you know. Cut them out before both of these happen
     
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  16. samarai

    samarai Rookie

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    There are players at my court that will play with poly until it breaks. In fact having conversations with them, they actually sring with poly because they feel it never breaks. They are a little better player than I am and have played for much longer than me so I try not to offer any advice.
     
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  17. samarai

    samarai Rookie

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    There are players at my court that will play with poly until it breaks. In fact having conversations with them, they actually sring with poly because they feel it never breaks. They are a little better player than I am and have played for much longer than me so I try not to offer any advice. Sad because some of them actually complain of arm pains and u can see that they have different supports on when they play.
     
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  18. Bartelby

    Bartelby G.O.A.T.

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    But the tell-tale sign for me is that when you pull the strings off position they tend to slide back, then click back, then noisily and barely click back and then don't click back.

    I think one's hearing is the best organ for hearing the disappearance of string on string slide.



     
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  19. Rjtennis

    Rjtennis Hall of Fame

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    With a lot of people using poly these days, all of us would know way more injured players if poly was as dangerous as everyone here is saying. I agree that players should cut poly out after 15 or so hours of play but the vast majority of club players do not do it. You are taking a risk if you leave poly in for extended periods of time, but it is not 100% what so ever that you are going to suffer elbow problems. I think if you are already susceptible to elbow issues poly in general is going to inflame it and dead poly will inflame it quick. However, if you have a healthy elbow and good form your not all that likely to have issues. The problem is that once you get tennis elbow it never seems to go away. Maybe I'm off base but as a stringer and competitive player I only know a handful of people who have gotten tennis elbow.
     
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  20. tlm

    tlm Legend

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    This is a very accurate post.
     
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  21. joe sch

    joe sch Hall of Fame

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    I also believe that hybrid of gut/poly, especially if the gut is in the mains allows long extended playing of the dead poly and can play till the gut breaks without concern of tennis elbow. Works for me and I have had TE in the past but no issues with gut/poly. Another nice combination effect of the gut/poly is that the natural gut will drop a little tension to further offset the dead poly disadvantage.

    If I was playing all poly, I would restring when the poly goes dead.
     
    #21
  22. emilyhex

    emilyhex Rookie

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    When I consistently keep hitting the net cord and overall control becomes noticeably worse. This could be due to other reasons as well, of course. But, if it's been at least a month or two since I've strung and I'm having bad outings, it's time to restring. At the very least I can't blame the strings after I've had them redone.
     
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  23. SuperHead

    SuperHead Guest

    You can simply feel if it's dead or not
     
    #23
  24. fortun8son

    fortun8son Hall of Fame

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    Use the John Cleese 'bang-it-on-the-counter' test.
    Sorry, but someone had to say it.;);)
     
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  25. user92626

    user92626 Legend

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    ok, lots of guys go by the mains snapping back, but what if you string really tight and you hit really soft that you never move the mains in the first place?

    About the number of hours, is that straight hitting or what? Rec players tend to play very slow, sometimes 10 hours of rec player = intensity, impact of 30 minutes of pros.
     
    #25
  26. Top Jimmy

    Top Jimmy Semi-Pro

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    For those players that can't "feel" when they are dead or not, I normally notice two things.

    One: Strings are out of alignment and aren't snapping back to position zero.

    Two: Balls start flying deep because not enough spin, either on the baseline or on serves too. When I start double faulting the strings are cooked.

    Never had a sore elbow in my life so not sure how I feel about the injury claims.
     
    #26
  27. Top Jimmy

    Top Jimmy Semi-Pro

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    They shouldn't be using them in the first place.

    They don't swing hard enough to do any damage to their bodies IMO, so who cares.
     
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  28. Fearsome Forehand

    Fearsome Forehand Professional

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    I would agree that once the ball starts flying long on you, cut them out.
    It is really a personal preference sort of thing.
     
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  29. NE1for10is?

    NE1for10is? Semi-Pro

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    Is there any kind of list anywhere that rates the poly strings that last the longest and go dead the fastest?
     
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  30. barry

    barry Hall of Fame

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    #30
  31. NE1for10is?

    NE1for10is? Semi-Pro

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    Interesting. Does tension loss necessarily equate with that boardy, painful feeling you get when poly goes dead? It seems like there's always a dramatic tension loss in the first few hours, but they're stil playable for a while longer before they go dead.

    I guess I'm more wondering if there is a list of hours of playability. For example, I know that BHBR goes dead after 10-12 hours and there's no control anymore.
     
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  32. barry

    barry Hall of Fame

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    I think the loss of elasticity is the boardy feel. Maybe the more tension loss in the first 24 hours equates to the time you get before the boardy feel. I agree on BHBR 3 matches and cut it out.
     
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  33. mikeler

    mikeler G.O.A.T.

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    You can't apply the mains snapping back theory to the Prince Exo Tour. The strings move immediately out of place with just about any string type.
     
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