I give up. Can't play pushers.

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by luishcorreia, Apr 27, 2013.

  1. Mick

    Mick Legend

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    I see :)
    I should have written "attempt to hit a winner within 2 or 3 shots" because most of the balls would land way out.
     
  2. Bobs tennis

    Bobs tennis Rookie

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    Everyone wants to hit that homerun.Big serve and big ground strokes.Your right as a rec. player you like to hit against someone who hits even harder.I think you forgot that word "recreational" player.The harder you hit the more risk you take.Your not a pro and you can't hit hard consistently.I'm sure that you don't like to lose,I don't,so I will try to adapt to many of his strategies,even if I don't like them, in order to not lose and if that upsets you then continue to say "i lost but he was a pusher".In baseball there are many players who never hit homeruns but are always on base.In pickup basketball there are many players that never shoot but are very good dribbling and passing and not fat and hanging on others.That is why pushers win.Let me say again I don't like the style but I like to get to the next round...
     
  3. Relinquis

    Relinquis Hall of Fame

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    one of my regular hitting partners is a pusher with a massive serve... i love it. helps me work on my footwork, point construction and ability to crush sitters & end rallies with winners.

    you should be grateful that someone is pushing against you and challenging you to improve your tennis, rather than just feeding you with drill-type balls. those are good for practice and warm-up.

    everyone can hit a rally ball in their strike-zone, that's easy. adjusting to the incoming ball whether it is loopy topspin, lob, slice, drop shot or shank is part of tennis, a big part of tennis.
     
    Last edited: May 11, 2013
  4. Shroud

    Shroud Hall of Fame

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    Hate pushers myself but as much as I hate to admit it, it is part of tennis.

    Heck I won an A tournament by becoming a pusher.

    That was what I had to do to win against that guy. Whats weird is that all these years later i still dont think I deserved that win :)

    Imho playing pushers is a mental affair. Whats common in these posts is mental breakdown.

    If you ever watched star trek the next generation you might remember an episode where Data the android loses a game to an alien. It freaks him out because he should easily win with his machine reflexes and processing power. He ends up playing a rematch and instead of trying to win he merely plays to prolong the game. This embarrasses the alien and he resigns in a fuss.

    Thats a pushers game.....
     
  5. mikeespinmusic

    mikeespinmusic Rookie

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    Thats another thing that annoys most. Pusher's don't train or play much compared to players who have put in the time to learn developed strokes and a thrill for the game. And they use cop-out strokes and strategies that revolve around dying balls (e.g forcing the real player to constantly overhit junk due to dead balls and low pace making it super hard to apply any topspin control) at Rec level. So of course this will annoy proper players. It would be bad for their technique to train with them.
     
  6. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Strange, I know a few self confessed A/Open, or 5.5 guys who say they themselves are pushers. Then have great strokes, can hit hard, but prefer to shove it back deep and soft to pester and annoy their opponent's, instead of just hitting the winners they are easily capable of.
    Then again, I know a few self confessed 7.O's, who push just to annoy and pester their opponents.
    You know those guys.
     
  7. Relinquis

    Relinquis Hall of Fame

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    mental focus trick...

    you need to have one or two patterns of play that will set up short balls you can put away... practice these and when you play pushers use them on auto pilot... that's what a lot of the clay courters do.

    an example might be...
    • start cross court backhand rally
    • give loopy topspin cross court Or deep cross court ball
    • step in a bit and hit medium pace backhand cross court with more angle... gives you short ball
    • step in and around it and hit forehand inside in for the winner.. no need to paint the lines.

    You can do the same pattern but replace the angled backhand with an inside out one if you want... can mix it up and use a slice instead of the loopy topspin, etc...

    The key is that this pattern (and others like it) is something you practice and drill so in a match you just have to automatically implement pattern A or pattern B rather than thinking about every move. Against pushers this is very useful because it cuts down on the mental stress and they have no weapons to hurt you, so you will get a lot of points before they start to change things up and mess with your pattern of play.
     
  8. Rui

    Rui Semi-Pro

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    A good term, that I've heard, for mental focus is shot tolerance. It describes the point where a player tries to hit shots outside of his comfort zone to make something happen. A pusher's shot tolerance is huge.
     
  9. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    I think the opposite.
    A pusher KNOWS his limits, and will not hit outside or beyond his ability. That is, his shot tolerance is tiny, because he never goes for any shot that he might miss.
    OTOH, a pusher can handle all sorts of hard and difficult shots, and still get them back into play.
     
  10. WildVolley

    WildVolley Legend

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    Rui is correct, LeeD. Shot tolerance is usually defined as meaning the ability to just keep hitting the ball back in before trying to hit something outside your comfort zone.

    So a "pusher" by definition has a very high shot tolerance. On the other hand, serve and volley players usually don't. Clay court grinders tend to have high shot tolerance, too.
     
  11. Rui

    Rui Semi-Pro

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    I think see your perspective. I was referring to the number of shots hit before the pressure to make something happen kicks in.
     
  12. Bobs tennis

    Bobs tennis Rookie

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    I think a funny aspect of this subject is hearing a player call others pushers and then being called a pusher themselves by others.So be careful who you call a pusher.I'm coming closer and closer to beating my friend the pusher but only because i've gotten better with changing pace,adding moonballs,drop shots and anything else that seems to upset him.Actually I thought that is what tennis was about not just bashing one or two shots at each other.I agree with what some have said here about the pushers game but your wrong to think pushers don't work on their game.My friend is very driven and plays atleast 5 days and sometimes twice in the same day.After playing he usually goes to the Gym and swims.I've criticized him for not practicing his strokes and only wanting to play sets but he feels I practice to much.I've read the internet gurus feel pushers are more interested in winning then the process. I feel if you can beat this type player you are doing well...
     
  13. mikeespinmusic

    mikeespinmusic Rookie

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    :-?....That only proves maliciousness and reinforces why people hate them .... :cry:

    But at those levels, thats more like Brad Gilberting the situation
     
  14. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Harold Solomon, Eddy Dibbs, Brad of course, Miraslov Mecir, Olivier Rochus, Alberto Barasetechi, Michael Chang, CarolineWozniaki, AgnasRadwasnka.
     
  15. Broly4

    Broly4 Rookie

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    Berasategui was far from a pusher Lee
     
  16. mikeespinmusic

    mikeespinmusic Rookie

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    Ironically I did lose to 2 last night. Filling in for a lower division. I bought a new Aero Pro drive and didn't really want to implement my counter/dirty strategy. Didnt win for the typical reasons people have pointed out. I was trying to apply the big topspin with this frame. It didnt happen.

    Technically I think of that as good research :p - You can't apply normal strokes to them in heavy and slippery conditions. You just have to keep shortening your back swing to "pusher" levels and you almost have to compromise your entire technique for it. Which is why its so boring. Because a player works hard and is then keen to apply what they've learned. Doesn't happen against these types- or at least when the balls get old.
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2013
  17. anubis

    anubis Hall of Fame

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    Just thought of something: pushers often thrive on long rallies. If you're uncomfortable with long rallies, then they have an advantage over you. Once they get you past 6 to 8 shots, then they pretty much "have you".

    If that's the case, then you can work on longevity drills with a hitting partner or a coach. You have to get to a 50 shot rally. Once you're comfortable @ 50, then bump it up to 75, and then to 100.

    If hitting 50 shots doesn't bother you at all, then neither will a pusher. But if you can't get to 10 before dumping it into the net, then yeah, a pusher can have his way with you pretty easily.
     
  18. Mick

    Mick Legend

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    yeah but some people here (not me) would say by doing what you are suggesting, the player is learning how to become a better pusher instead of a better tennis player :)

    if you don't go for a winner within 5 hits, you are a pusher :)
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2013

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