I hate this and I quit

Discussion in 'Stringing Techniques / Stringing Machines' started by sstchur, Jun 28, 2009.

  1. sstchur

    sstchur Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
    Messages:
    1,595
    Location:
    Sammamish, WA
    Stringing racquets is not humanly possible.
     
    #1
  2. charliefedererer

    charliefedererer Legend

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2009
    Messages:
    5,639
    What's the problem?
     
    #2
  3. Mr. Blond

    Mr. Blond Professional

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2006
    Messages:
    816
    well that must mean I am super human, cuz I have strung a thousand or so.
     
    #3
  4. sstchur

    sstchur Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
    Messages:
    1,595
    Location:
    Sammamish, WA
    Yes, I absolutely believe you are super human!
     
    #4
  5. sstchur

    sstchur Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
    Messages:
    1,595
    Location:
    Sammamish, WA
    Honestly don't even know how to explain all of my problems. Can't seem to mount well, can't get the clamp tightness set propertly.

    Just when I thought I was getting the hang of it, string broke.

    Feels quite hopeless at this point.

    And yes, I've watched a ton of yulitle's videos. They are excellent, but he makes it look so much easier than it is (for me anyway)
     
    #5
  6. Mr. Blond

    Mr. Blond Professional

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2006
    Messages:
    816
    what machine are you using? What racquet ya stringing? What string and tension ya using?

    we can only help if you provide us with some understanding to your situation.
     
    #6
  7. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2007
    Messages:
    12,268
    Location:
    Marietta, Ga
    Where are you located? Maybe someone on the forum may be close to you and able to help you out. Anyone can string a racket trust me.

    Irvin
     
    #7
  8. VGP

    VGP Legend

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2005
    Messages:
    6,311
    Location:
    Location: Location
    I feel for you.....6 hrs for your first stringjob. I read your other posts.

    Yeah, fill us in on your details.....racket/machine/string......

    Perhaps you're just not the "handy" type. I would recommend you stick with it. Being able to string your own really has its benefits.
     
    #8
  9. jmverdugo

    jmverdugo Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2006
    Messages:
    2,971
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    Maybe you are too young? Maybe you are watching TV while doing it? the first times you have to really pay attention at every detail, it is not hard but you have to pay attention to what you are doing. IMHO.
     
    #9
  10. Mansewerz

    Mansewerz Legend

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2007
    Messages:
    9,164
    Location:
    Caught in No Man's Land
    Unless he's twelve, too young my ass. I was 15 when I learned.
     
    #10
  11. iplaybetter

    iplaybetter Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2007
    Messages:
    3,441
    Location:
    behind you, but i have to be somewhere else by the
    just stick with it, it will get better

    it takes at least 25 to feel anything beyond stupid when you finish'


    ps:not to young, i learned at 12 and did about 500 last summer at 14
     
    #11
  12. charliefedererer

    charliefedererer Legend

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2009
    Messages:
    5,639
    Put it away for tonight.
    Tomorrow is another day.

    Before you start stringing, use some of your broken short string to tie a few knots so you won't break the string when you tie that last knot like I did on my first string job. Ahhhhhhh!

    The higher tension you string, the more difficult to weave and feed the string throug any holes already covered by strings. If you are still practicing on an older racquet, try stringing it at a lower tension just to get the hang of it. (You can always use string savers to keep the strings from migrating if you decide to use this racquet.)

    "When angry, count to ten, before you speak [or post]; if very angry, a hundred."
    - Thomas Jefferson
     
    #12
  13. jim e

    jim e Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2007
    Messages:
    4,385
    Irregardless of what some posters say here, the more features the machine , the easier it is to string. I'm not saying that the more expensive ones do a better job, as I don't want to p*ss off anyone here, but the more features the easier, and less frustrating the job.
    If you had a 6 point mounting, and fixed clamps, and a crank, or decent electronic, that would be my bare minimum. I like the so called bells and whistles on a machine, as that is what makes stringing a pleasure rather than a job to do.I started to string when I was 13 years old back in the 60's, and the person that sold me his machine spent a day and taught me the basics of stringing(was an old automatic type drop weight, had fixed clamps, a machine that most here would not know of made back in the 40's). Maybe you could find a stringer locally to help you along.Once you get the hang of it, its simple.
     
    Last edited: Jun 28, 2009
    #13
  14. sstchur

    sstchur Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
    Messages:
    1,595
    Location:
    Sammamish, WA
    I do appreciate everyone's support. I was frustrated and being melodramatic. It's not quite as bad as I originally made it out to be when I posted this, but it was darn frustrating!

    I think I'm getting better though... I'm nearly done with a practice racquet (an old Dunlop Black Max).

    I think I've done it right so far. I was trying to use one piece which is the only pattern I could find. But I had a friend come over who encouraged me to do it with two and that seemed to help me a bit.

    My real racquet is a Gamma T-7, but I'm scared to try with that one b/c I don't want to ruin it. Also, I'm using practice string right now ($1.45 nylon) but the string I will eventually use is a 17g synthetic gut -- I'm worried about breaking it. I already broke the nylon my first attempt (probably b/c I screw up so many times and kinked it)

    Anyway, I think I'm getting closer finally.

    One question: what advantage is there (if any) of a one-piece stringing pattern? Can any racquet be strung either way?

    Even though Gamma only lists a two piece pattern for me racquet, should I go with one piece if I eventually learn how to do it?
     
    #14
  15. Dgpsx7

    Dgpsx7 Professional

    Joined:
    May 1, 2009
    Messages:
    1,164
    the first couple times es especially the first it may be discouraging but after you do a couple it will get a lot easier and even be be less hard on your hands. If you do two full jobs without mistakes you will be fine from then on. Watch YUlitle's videos on youtube and search how to string a racket on youtube and watch the videos as well. I just learned how to string two weeks ago and I am pretty good now.
     
    #15
  16. dgoldman

    dgoldman New User

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2008
    Messages:
    82
    Location:
    dc
    I did a few jobs using two piece at first and then tried an ATW pattern which Ive stuck with for my ag200s. Give yourself a break too. You just got the machine yesterday. I think once you get it you will look back at this and laugh.
     
    #16
  17. charliefedererer

    charliefedererer Legend

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2009
    Messages:
    5,639
    This was posted by jim e two days ago in another thread started by you, and it is good advice:
    "With your racquet, you are best to use a 2 piece pattern, since you are just starting to learn to string. The USRSA lists the pattern for your racquet as a 2 piece only, most likely as the mains end at the throat, so you string the racquet cross strings from the head to the throat. Once you get use to stringing, you can string an ATW pattern to do a 1 piece, but at this point in your stringing you should string it as the manuf. specifies and string it as a 2 piece job. I would even string it as a 2 piece job anyways for various reasons even though I know a good # of ATW patterns to use. Good luck! Jim
    ( BTW if you run into problems, post it here, as someone will most likely see it to help you out!)"
    The USRSA is the US Racquet Stringers Association, and gives about the best advice on stringing you can get: http://www.usrsa.com/
    Stick with two piece stringing for this racquet.
    Good to hear you've finished your first string job.
    Congratulations!
    It sounds like you learned a lot, and your next job should be a lot less aggravating. Even satisfying.
     
    #17
  18. Il Mostro

    Il Mostro Banned

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2008
    Messages:
    3,079
    Location:
    Sunny SoCal
    +1 on full-feature machines making thing easier. Also, to the OP, how is your relationship with your local stringer? Ask if you can hang out and watch while he/she strings your Gamma. The videos are great, but in person observation is better yet. Before buying a machine, I spent time with an MRT just to gain hands on knowledge and make sure I really wanted to make the investment. You'll be fine, no much how much trial and error you go through. Just keep plugging along on that old racquet. You will get the hang of things in time, developing even more patience and healthy sense of humor along the way.
     
    #18
  19. sstchur

    sstchur Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
    Messages:
    1,595
    Location:
    Sammamish, WA
    Ok, thanks for the info. I know I've asked about the patterns a few times now... I guess I should try to keep my threads more consolidated.

    But what does ATW mean? "Around the world" or something? But what does that mean? What does it have to do with racquet stringing?
     
    #19
  20. jim e

    jim e Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2007
    Messages:
    4,385
    ATW is a pattern of stringing, (there are a # of them), where if you wanted a 1 piece string job, and the end main strings end at the throat. Many manufactures specify that the cross strings be strung from the top(or head) of the racquet to the throat(bottom), and the way to do that is to utilize an ATW pattern where at some point you take the long side string and go around the racquet with it.Its a way to string a racquet top down when the mains end at the bottom.
    Watch some of yulitles videos listed on the faq of this forum, and you will see what it is all about. He does a real good job of explination. Jim
     
    #20
  21. atennisrand

    atennisrand Banned

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2009
    Messages:
    196
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    I was also seriously frustrated with stringing when I first attempted to learn it, especially with misweaving and remembering how to tie correct knots at the end.

    Just keep at watching those instructional videos and dont worry about wasting string until you get the method of how you wish to string down pat.

    In fact also did what you are trying and simply cut out an old set of strings and did a mock string job on my current racquet to get used to how to pull tension etc then when I got to the end and had too more string to tie off with I would restart the process.

    Just keep reading up and good luck.
     
    #21
  22. Vermillion

    Vermillion Banned

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2007
    Messages:
    1,230
    stringing 2 piece is really less of a hassle to deal with than 1 piece when I started.
     
    #22

Share This Page