I pushed...Yikes!!!

Discussion in 'Adult League & Tournament Talk' started by smiley74, Jan 24, 2008.

  1. smiley74

    smiley74 Rookie

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    So, had my second official match today and won 6-1 and 6-2. I had won my first match 6-0 6-0 so was feeling pretty darn good!

    Well, my pro was on the next court today giving a lesson. After my match I also had a lesson scheduled. He promptly wiped the smile off my face; declared I pushed the whole match and should either hit my strokes correctly or not play matches at all (due to acquiring bad habits). Knocked me right down off cloud nine!

    However, I know I was tentative and conservative and wasn't hitting correctly. My serves were weak as I just wanted to get them in.

    So, he continues by saying that I might win now but who cares because I won't win later. So, better to lose now and go for my shots and improve my game than to win and never get better. He said keep going for my shots now and they will eventually go in!

    Howard.......OMG you were right!!!!!

    To him, pushing meant I was just getting the ball over without correct strokes, pace, or spin- no follow through, etc.

    So- there you have it. Pushing is NOT good!!! It's one thing to retrieve balls by hitting correctly and waiting for your opponent to make a mistake and another to just get the ball over any which way. I learned my lesson, for sure!

    So, now I am mentally preparing myself to get crushed in my upcoming matches! *sigh* Maybe I will suprise myself...but I doubt it! LOL
     
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  2. AR15

    AR15 Professional

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    It's understandable to play "tight" in your first match. However, I think if you had lost, you would play your next match even tighter, and demonstrate even worse technique.
     
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  3. Djokovicfan4life

    Djokovicfan4life Legend

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    I have the opposite problem. I tend to just swing away without thinking about playing high percentage shots. :wink:
     
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  4. Moz

    Moz Hall of Fame

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    Smiley

    Just curious - would you honestly have been happier if you'd lost but taken a good cut at your strokes?

    On the flip side of developing a game with proper strokes etc is developing a temperament where you do what you have to do to win whatever the circumstances. Sometimes pushing maybe the answer.

    I see no reason why you can't develop good strokes whilst still winning by pushing - if that is what it takes in some circumstances.

    Well done on the win!
     
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  5. wao

    wao Professional

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    Didn't Brad Gilbert write a book called Winning Ugly, not saying that smiley that you won that way. As you go through a match you have to adapt to what is working on that day. If hitting a big flat ball isn't working then you adapt and try to hit with more spin ect. ect. If I am playing a person that can't keep the ball in play for more than a couple of strokes or can't generate power off a no pace ball then why wouldn't you go after that weekness. Winning 6-2 6-1 it would appear that they couldn't that style of game. GOOD WIN AND KEEP IT GOING WHILE STILL IMPROVING.
     
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  6. raiden031

    raiden031 Legend

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    Its good that you learned this early rather than a couple years down the road. I don't think it is ever worth it to sacrifice form in order to play a pushing game. Once people get too comfortable with pushing, its hard to get out of it because they will not have confidence when attempting proper strokes.
     
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  7. smiley74

    smiley74 Rookie

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    Hi, all!

    Well, I DO see his point. I think pusher as Gilbert defines it is a player who can get to everything and waits for opponents to make mistakes. They don't beat themselves. Think Michael Chang. However, he DEFINITELY hit the ball correctly.

    I have the Gilbert book and it's GREAT! Also, check out Beyond Big Shots (I think that's the title) by Greg Moran.

    What I guess I did was I just barely swung and "pushed" the ball over the net instead of stroking the ball correctly with proper follow through. I way let off the pace too and could have hit with more topspin.

    To my pro- pushing means not hitting correctly(mechanically).

    He said if I play like that I will stay at 3.0 forever like the players I am beating. I am winning now because I am hitting high perecentage shots (cross court etc), waiting for them to overhit, and am relying on my superior athleticism to get to balls and "arm" them over. However, he said once I move up, better players will be athletic AND able to hit with pace, spin, and placement.

    So, if I want to be a better player 4.0+ someday I had better learn to hit correctly. He said I don't have to hit with tons of pace but I DO have to hit correctly with proper follow through and rotation.

    He said I can add more pace and spin later on because than I will have the proper foundation to support it.

    I mean, I can hit with good pace and spin but I am like at 75% because I can't control it when I go all out. Problem is I hit this way in fun rallies, lessons, and clinics but "pushed" in the matches.

    I think part of the problem is I feel pressured to win. The Tennis director said if I win my ladder matches than I can be placed on the Travel team and USTA team. So, I am just trying to "win". He was pleased that I won my first 2 matches by the scores I did considering I have been playing for less than 5 months and my opponents have been playing for years. However, my pro is disgusted and thinks the wins don't matter. :-(


    I do hit with a USTA Computer generated 3.5 and can hang ok with her. She NEVER pushes!!

    So, I am a bit bummed out right now. :???:
     
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  8. wao

    wao Professional

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    Don't be bummed. We are ALL trying to get better, it's all part of the PROCESS. Keep working at it.
     
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  9. HowardH

    HowardH New User

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    :)
    I won a match by "pushing" once. (please, lets not go round and round about the meaning of push) I absolutely hated it. I felt like I was playing patty cake baby tennis. I felt like I had sold out to myself or something, it was wierd and I didn't like it. I also didn't get any respect for playing that way from my team mates. Sure they were glad for the win but I was sort of embarassed by the way I played becasue I know I can play better.

    On the flip side I started coming out swinging with both barrels, although I lost I felt better about myself. Since then I've learned a few things.

    My game plan now is start slow, not pushing, just being consistent and staying in the point. As I start loosening up later and finding my range I start putting more and more pace on the shots and go for bigger passing or winning shots. Then I feel good about the tennis I'm playing and make far fewer unforced errors.

    Part of learning the game.
     
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  10. HowardH

    HowardH New User

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    Wow, sounds exactly like my instructor! Almost word for word.
     
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  11. smiley74

    smiley74 Rookie

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    Thanks Wao!

    Howard- is your Pro Russian too as maybe it's a cultural thing? :shock:
     
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  12. HowardH

    HowardH New User

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    My instructor is hispanic I beleive.
    I do play practice matches a couple times of week with a guy I thinks is Russian but have never asked him. He's very big, athletic, long hair and pony tail with a strong accent that sounds russian to me but could be anything. I have to listen close because it's hard sometimes to understand him. Great guy and a great practice partner.
     
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  13. maverick66

    maverick66 Hall of Fame

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    i disagree with your instructor on this. you need to win to gain confidence. if that means you push till you feel comfortable to hit out then do it. how does losing help even if you have correct form you lost. that puts doubt into your head about how your swinging and leads to all kinds of bad. learn to win first then start worrrying about making adjustments to your game.
     
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  14. HowardH

    HowardH New User

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    Doubt for a little while now and pick up a few measly wins but good stroke technique in itself provides confidence. Sure you can win by pushing and feel good for the win now but get left behind and crushed later, by those that have taken the time to learn right. We aren't all playing just for a small win over a nobody player now. Some of us are trying to make our games better in the long run. :)
     
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  15. HowardH

    HowardH New User

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    Let me rephrase, I'm a small nobody players now and will never be a pro or make a living at tennis but I have seen a huge confidence boost as a result of trying to play good technique tennis and I'm starting to win more matches and gain more respect from my peers in the game. Also the better I play the more fun and competitive tennis is for me.
     
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  16. Cindysphinx

    Cindysphinx G.O.A.T.

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    Smiley, you have a terrific pro, IMHO. Stick with that guy!

    I played only one 3.0 singles match last year. I won, giving up just 3 games.

    And I was embarrassed. Because I pushed. I just outlasted her. I checked what little technique I had at the door because I wanted to win. It's a waste. Like Howard says, it doesn't even feel good.

    And in the long run, it flat out does not work. Eventually you meet someone who *is* hitting correctly, and you can't hang with them by pushing. So you try to revive the technique you have paid all of this money to acquire, and you can't do it in the heat of battle because you have grown used to pushing.

    I think you have to decide whether you want to win now by pushing (and get on the USTA team or whatever) or want to win later by developing your technique.

    As for me, I am very glad that for the most part I tried to stick with my technique even if I lost. I don't mean that you or I should try to blast the ball. I mean that every shot should be the best quality shot we can produce at that moment.

    My pro said that you have to play the way you practice and practice the way you play. If you are trying to switch back and forth between hitting correctly (practice) and pushing (matches), you'll slow your progress considerably.

    You know, my pro doesn't ask me whether I won or lost. He wants to know whether I personally played well. He's right, you know? Some of my finest memories of matches are times when I played well technically and strategically but still lost.

    The matches where I chickened out and pushed I'd like to forget.
     
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  17. fe6250

    fe6250 Semi-Pro

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    Interesting dilema for a new player. I agree that getting the technique right is important and that simply getting it back won't get it done long term, but sometimes it's hard taking the loss when the technique isn't working. Eventually you will have the weapons to win with technique - but altering your strategy (conservative / aggressive, etc...) to win, while not compromising hitting good strokes.

    Hang in there and don't be too sure you will lose!
     
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  18. goober

    goober Legend

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    Unless you want to stay at 3.0-3.5 forever, your instructor is spot on. The main problem with winning matches with push strokes is that it becomes habit. You start doing it all the time because it works and it becomes in engrained in your muscle memory. You keep winning but eventually you get to a point when you move up to a level where you can't beat anybody because of your strokes. It is very difficult for somebody who has been hitting bad strokes for years to then suddenly change. Many don't and that is why you see people who stay at 3.0-3.5 for decades. That is not necessarily bad, but most serious club tennis players aspire to something higher.

    It is much easier to start learning the correct techniquet to begin with even if it means you lose early on.
     
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  19. Nellie

    Nellie Hall of Fame

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    I think a big problem we all share is to play one way in practice and to then tighten up and play more conservatively in a match. I don't know if you changed your technique because of your nerves or because you started hitting a couple and it just worked.

    I think that your instructor is giving you good advise because there is nothing worse than losing your strokes during a match. If you start poking at the ball and it stops working, there is little you can do, whereas if you start long, you can shorten your strokes as needed, for example, if the opponent is giving you a lot of pace.
     
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  20. JRstriker12

    JRstriker12 Hall of Fame

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    Don't mean to disagree with your pro, but CONFIDENCE can do wonders for your game. If you get two good wins under your belt with a nice margin (6-0, 6-2 etc.) that means you may be able to go for a bit more in your match. Don't go all out, but it means you can go for a bit more.
     
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  21. HowardH

    HowardH New User

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    Confidence is a great thing and in the very very early stages of ones tennis game winning feels good no matter how it's acheived. For me, though, a 3.5 wannabee, nothing feels as good as a win knowing I played my best tennis, now that's a confidence booster.
     
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  22. HowardH

    HowardH New User

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    Sorry for all of the back to back posts!

    JR is right also about having the confidence to go for more each time.
     
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  23. cak

    cak Professional

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    I agree on the point that if you want to get better you need to improve strokes. But getting better does not necessarily go hand in hand with moving up through the NTRP ranks. Winning does. Pushers will get moved up faster for awhile, because they can win at 2.5, 3.0, and 3.5. So when deciding if you are improving or not do not base it on NTRP rating, or how well you are moving up in respect to others around you. Base it on how you feel, or how well you like how your game looks, or how well you play in practice. If you concentrate on NTRP or USTA wins you will get discouraged. And this is why so many players learn strategy and defense first, and pick up strokes later, the NTRP rewards that.
     
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  24. JRstriker12

    JRstriker12 Hall of Fame

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    Well now that you mention it, it should be more like a process. I know that in my first competative matches, I was so tight it was hard to play excatly how I know I could play. Sometimes I just had to to my best to get the ball back and weather the storm.

    But each match, I worried less about winning or losing and was able to loosen up and play bettertennis - each match I new I could go for a bit more and didn't have to hold back as much.

    I definitely don't win all the time, but building on wins and also losses - helped me bring my game along.

    Looks like smiley has all the tools to be good, he just has to loosen and realize that these wins indicate that he can play the type of tennis his pro is talking about. I have to sympathize though, looke like smiley is facing a bit of presure to win to get on the USTA and travel teams - it's not always easy to loosen up under those conditions.

    I don't advocate pushing, but sometimes being able to grind it out, retrieve balls, get the ball back into play, and stay consistent can be a great tool to pull out of your bag when your "A" game just isn't on.
     
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  25. Sup2Dresq

    Sup2Dresq Hall of Fame

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    I agree with your coach.

    Pushing will get you so far even if you win a lot at lower levels. Confidence he may have shot down now is better than going up a level and not understanding why you are always on the defense. I know this all too well, cause ever since i came back.. i tend to get trapped playing lower level peeps,.. and just need to keep the ball in play to win. I later go to nationals and have my hands full. Wasn't like that back in the day where I went for my shots.

    Invest in your shots. I'm not saying bang it, but step in.. go for the shot.. don't just chip it in and be tentative. If you feel you are holding back.. then you are definetly not improving. You are being safe and comfortable. If thats what you like.. I suggest to me that the public park weekend play is your ultimate goal.
     
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  26. Sup2Dresq

    Sup2Dresq Hall of Fame

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    "If you are not moving forward.. you are moving backwards"

    "The most important thing you can do to achieve your goals is to make sure that as soon as you set them, you immediately begin to create momentum."
    Anthony Robbins
     
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  27. Cindysphinx

    Cindysphinx G.O.A.T.

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    I understand the confidence argument, but I can't get behind it.

    Smiley now has two good push wins under her belt. So does that mean it is time to stop pushing? If so, then I guess we're all in agreement that now is the time to stop pushing. :)

    Also, I lived this nightmare myself. I pushed at 2.5, and it worked great because I could push better than the next person. Oh, I was confident, all right, bordering on the cocky. I only met one person all year who could beat me.

    I then pushed at 3.0. All that 2.5 confidence evaporated and I was left with nothing but crummy strokes.

    Confidence achieved through pushing your way to a win evaporates on you at very predictable times: Whenever you start losing.
     
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  28. fe6250

    fe6250 Semi-Pro

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    I believe we are all agreeing that 'pushing' or more specifically inadequate strokes will only take you so far in tennis. With that in mind, it is important to determine what your goals are for tennis before deciding what you should and shouldn't do.

    In my own case, I'm still trying to get better and have an idea of how far I would like to develop in my abilitiies that would negate a 'win at all cost' strategy. That said, there are many people playing tennis that don't give a hoot about advancing and want to just win matches, so perhaps the advice for them would be different.
     
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  29. kevhen

    kevhen Hall of Fame

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    I disagree with your pro. He should not take your confidence away from you so early in your competitive career. Winning at lowest levels means learning how to keep the ball in play. You are doing that. To continue to improve, you will want to focus on better technique placing the ball deeper, etc. but that all will come with time. You know how to win. He seems to want to teach you to learn how to lose. Losing with great technique has few rewards. Keep practicing and working on improving your technique but don't try to change your current game too much or too fast. Keep doing what works but improve on what you are doing.
     
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  30. Supernatural_Serve

    Supernatural_Serve Professional

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    I disagree also, yet I understand his motive, but pushing is also a very useful skill to acquire even if its not ones ultimate skill or game plan

    - its an effective strategy against players who have poor legs, conditioning and it works against over hitters who are inconsistent at generating their own pace (lots of players 4.0 and under).

    - all of us need to develop our defensive game not just our offensive game

    - everyone benefits from improving their touch, feel, range of power, and all the good things one can do with enhanced hands

    - it teaches patience and improves one's shot tolerance

    I would be a better player and win a few more matches if I used more push skills against certain players at the right time because as we all know simply handing someone pace and power often feeds right into their game plan.

    A pro with a clue would respect a pusher's game for what it is without all the negative judgments and evaluate their students objectively helping them develop pusher skills just like they should be teaching the all court, baseline, serve and volley game too.

    A teaching pro who believes the only game worth mastering (especially at lower levels) is the aggressive baseline game, is a clown.
     
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  31. HowardH

    HowardH New User

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    No one ever said our instructors were teaching a basline only game. Where did you get that? Certainly not mine. We are currently working on our net game and volleys. Just because we want to use proper strokes doesn't automacially make us all "hard hitting baseline only" players or our instructors clowns.

    No one ever said pushing was not effective at lower levels, especially for beginners. As far as I'm concerned if people are happy pushing all of their tennis lives, fine. I'm not one of them.
     
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  32. Cindysphinx

    Cindysphinx G.O.A.T.

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    Only Smiley can tell us what she wants out of tennis and something about her potential to progress.

    Oh, wait. She already has!

    She wants to become a ranked player in her area. She is fast and quite fit. After just a few months, she can hang with good players. She takes a boatload of instruction, which is something people do when they want to improve and improve quickly.

    Yet it's OK to push and *not hit the way she has been taught to hit?*

    Hey, her pro saw her in the push victory. He didn't think much of it. That says a lot. I mean, any pro who said to me, "Hey, I saw your match, and although you didn't hit any of your shots the way I know you can, you outlasted that inferior player, so I'm good with it!" would get the boot.
     
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  33. goober

    goober Legend

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    Yup yup-

    I am actually surprised that people are disagreeing with her pro. How many of us have the luxury to have a teaching pro watch a match of ours that counts and then critique us?

    If I were to start a beginner on tennis, I would have them work on strokes, serves volleys, ect. until they have reasonable technique and only play out practice points. Only when they have reasonable technique start playing real matches. Of course that would be an ideal situation, most people don't have the patience to wait that long!
     
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  34. wao

    wao Professional

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    Based on the skill level I would agree. I wish I had the luxury of having a teaching pro watch. maybe I would get better. Once the person has reasonable technique and starts playing matches, you play to your strength and your opponents weaknesses.
     
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  35. rosenstar

    rosenstar Professional

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    In practice, you do everything as correct as possible. Strive for perfect form and perfect shot selection.

    However, in a match situation you do what you need to do to win. If you practice correctly, as you improve in practice, what you learn will slowly start to naturally appear in your matches.
     
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  36. fe6250

    fe6250 Semi-Pro

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    Anyone ever take a golf lesson with a good pro? The first thing they (usually) will say is, 'do you want to get better with what you got or do you want to get a lot better?' The implication is that they can work with what you have to make it as good as it can be or they can change it drastically - which generally makes you worse initially, but if you work at it will make you improve dramatically.

    I believe the same principles apply here. If you want to achieve what you can with what you got - that's one thing, but if you really want to get better.... So as Cindy pointed out - Smiley wants and has the potential to get a lot better - so listen to the pro!

    BTW - agree that it is awesome to have a pro watch your match. Not only is it great that they did it, but it gives them an opportunity to look at the whole game - not just a stroke. Kudos to your pro!
     
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  37. rosenstar

    rosenstar Professional

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    yeah, but you can always improve your technique. even the pros change their technique throughout their careers. subtle changes, but changes none the less. Tennis is an evolving game that is always training. The best teaching pros research the sport, read books on strategies, techniques and other new info.
     
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  38. Supernatural_Serve

    Supernatural_Serve Professional

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    point well taken

    Push or pushing is an overused often misunderstood term.

    If by push the OP did whatever she needed to stay in points, then I consider it a useful skill (since all tennis players at all levels do so from time to time rather than hit low percentage shots), if by push she meant abandon fundamental skills, stroke mechanics, etc. then that's undesireable.

    Yet I don't consider push, pushing, or pusher to be someone who has abandoned fundamental skills or good stroke mechanics. I know plenty of pushers whose mechanics are flawless and it shows in their consistency, placement, and depth, whether they "push" the ball or not.

    So, like I said, its an easily misunderstood overloaded term.

    Why would any instructor put down a student who won a match? Why not be positive, creative, and encouraging and talk objectively about the match with a critical eye both positive and negative of actual skills demonstrated.
     
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  39. Cindysphinx

    Cindysphinx G.O.A.T.

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    It depends on the student and the instructor.

    Me, I don't want happy talk and encouragement that was not earned.

    "Push" at the lower levels means pretty much what Smiley described: failing to finish the stroke. Just dinking it back. Believe me, it works fine at 2.5 and low 3.0.

    I'd guess the pushing is what annoyed the pro.

    Cindy -- who rarely gets positive evaluations from her pro that don't have the words "for your level" attached to the end of them, and who doesn't mind the qualification because it's true
     
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  40. IanRichardson

    IanRichardson Semi-Pro

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    from what i have seen it is once a pusher always a pusher, so i think your pro is kind of right. It is one thing to play good defense and hit safe shots. It is another thing to hit everything with some kind of crap slice or underspin just to keep the ball in play. I think is better to hit 'real' shots so that as you get better you will be in the practice of doing that. It is easy to push if you need to if you, but it is not easy to hit good shots when you are not used to doing that. I think I would take enough lessons that i felt confident in my strokes so that when i went to play a match I was comforatable. Play some ntrp tournaments with people who are your level so that you can practice using the proper technique and still have the chance of winning and gaining confidence.
     
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  41. HowardH

    HowardH New User

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    When I talk push that is the type of player I'm refering to. Just patty caking everything back with no planning, focus, pace, depth, and no technique at all, just getting it back by whatever means possible. Once you learn to play that way, abandoning what you've learned because you want to see a win by your name "right now", it is very hard to develop the confidence later to play differently.

    To me the person is way too afraid of losing. You can't be afraid to lose. Self esteem issue. :) see I'm smiling when I said that.
     
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  42. wao

    wao Professional

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    WOW pretty hard on yourself Cindy, though I am as well. I have to agree, who wants some to blow smoke. Tell me where I can improve on and what worked. BE POSITIVE though.
     
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  43. Cindysphinx

    Cindysphinx G.O.A.T.

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    "Good for your level" *is* positive.
     
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  44. smiley74

    smiley74 Rookie

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    Thanks to all that shared their thoughts! I apologize for the delay in replying..... This will be a long post so heads up!!!:oops:

    Yes, as Cindy noted, I would like to be ranked and, I guess, just plain really darn good someday whether I am ranked or not! I am pretty serious and want to be the best player I can possibly be (which I hope happens to be better than everyone else :twisted:). Just kidding!!!

    So, I think I will follow my pro's advice. But........Of course, the tennis director found out what he said and is freaking out. He said I need to win because at the end of the day it is all about wins and losses. *sigh* He also declared that by May when he puts me on his 3.0 USTA team we have a serious shot at going really far based on my talent. Umm, how the heck does he know what I will play like in May????

    What to do???? The TD controls all the teams.

    Maybe I should just play tournaments like I had originally planned and forget about the team stuff.

    I hit with the same TD today and he is Nationally ranked in the Top 25 for his age and I got several balls by him! Yeah!! First time, I have ever accomplished that feat!! He was pissed! Hahaha

    I tried to focus on what was happening and not just getting the ball back. So, today, when he backed up to baseline for several shots in a row to hit topspin forehands- I threw in a drop shot! Or, I worked on hitting a really topspinny steeper angled shot, when he ran to get it, I came to net and volleyed (of course- I missed my volley with my usual poor execution :shock:)!!. However, it's starting to click. Even got an offensive lob in for a winner when he came to net! He dropped his racquet and looked at me all disgusted! LOL He is super competitive!! Of course, he could have smoked me if he wanted too as his placement is crazy accurate. However, he is good about playing down and can actually coach you while playing which a lot of pros can't do. He was pleased with me and said that I am finally starting to think and I used appropriate shots and came to net at the right times-well played points he said. So, I am BACK on cloud nine! HAHAHA I am so pathetic and live or die by my daily tennis play!!

    So, I am starting to "get" it- at least for today! Tomorrow will be another story!! He has never seen me push as I have only done it in the 2 matches so I would win. I know I am not consistent enough to hit the heavy topspin shots I do on both sides. Maybe 6 out of 10 will go in. Not good enough. He says if I have to push do it but when my lead goes up to try to hit with more pace and spin. My pro (head pro of club) disagrees and said I am too talented to resort to pushing to win. He said he would put me in the class with his top juniors and he tells them to hit correctly with pace and spin, lose now, and win later.

    Man, what to do!!!! Should I forget about about all the travel team stuff and just play my club ladder matches with correct strokes and compete in tournaments?

    Howard- I am afraid to lose. I have played another sport at a very high level and when it's that competitive- you have to be perfect every single time because there are 20 people lined up to take your spot. Nothing is ever handed to you. So, when I play tennis, based on my past athletic experience, I work harder than anyone out there. You have too. If you want to be the best, you can't hope it will happen, you have to make it happen. You have to fight for it. When you play a sport at a high level, you become conditioned to being afraid to lose. In fact, people thought myself and my teammates loved to win but really- we were afraid of losing. That still drives me more than anything else......failing. I have never failed at anything athletic in my life and I am not about to start now!!!

    So, I think that's why I pushed. I couldn't mentally handle the thought of losing.

    OMG- This is becoming a psychology session!!:oops:

    I better sign off now as I am sure you all are sick of a newbies rants!!!
     
    #44
  45. Moz

    Moz Hall of Fame

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    Just win as much as you can - that should be your priority. You'll learn from any losses you have as long as you don't play an artificial strategy to satisfy someone on the court next to you.:evil:

    Play as many league and tournament matches as you can.

    Don't analyse it - if you go on court doing whatever it takes to win you'll get a rounded playing experience.

    You'll thrash people, you'll get spanked, you'll push and lose, you'll hit out and win, you'll push and win and you'll hit out and lose. Just get out there and try your hardest and work out ways to win.

    Did I mention try and win? The rest will come.
     
    #45
  46. wao

    wao Professional

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    The only other thing I would add is try to have FUN either way.
     
    #46
  47. HowardH

    HowardH New User

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    I've played high level sports also. I was a rodeo cowboy in high school and rode bulls. I was ranked the no. 1 bullrider in the state of Co. back in 1980. Talk about a mental sport. Bullriding is pure technique and mental. You can't just hang on for dear life against 2000 pounds and expect to make the whistle. You have to focus, have correct technique and be extremely win minded or you will get hurt. There was always the very real possiblity of get seriously hurt but you had to be able to push that back into your mind, not think about it and ride to win. When guys were to afraid of getting hurt which also could be applied to losing, they lost focus, technique went out the window and then they hit the ground hard, aka lost.

    I've also played baseball and being too afraid of making errors causes one to try too hard which caused errors.

    I'm older now and having the same bravado and I did when I was a young is much harder now for some reason and controlling the mind while playing tennis is not as easy as it would have been 20 years ago but the lessons still apply. :)

    Being too afraid to lose never produced very good results, that I've seen but if that is the motivation to keep you in the point then make it work for you.
     
    #47
  48. Moz

    Moz Hall of Fame

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    ha ha, honestly, I completely forgot about that.
     
    #48
  49. wao

    wao Professional

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    I have to remind myself of that fact sometimes.
     
    #49
  50. smiley74

    smiley74 Rookie

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    Sep 20, 2007
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    Howard-yeah so you probably know what I mean! No wonder you are so competitive! LOL

    Wao- I definitely have fun! I am nervous at first but then am just happy to be playing on the court. I just LOVE tennis so much! I would hit for 8 hours a day if I could! hahaha

    Sometimes, I hit and then hang around the lobby waiting for people to show up who might hit with me some more! :shock:

    I slept on it and am just going to go out there and try to play correctly but not get stressed out if I lose. I have to trust my pro that it will all work itself out eventually.:cool:

    Thanks guys for listening to my tirade!!!
     
    #50

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