I think poly strings are improving my game

Discussion in 'Strings' started by roman40, Jun 14, 2013.

  1. roman40

    roman40 Rookie

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    It looks like using full poly is improving my game. When playing with softer strings, including syngut and multis, I remember I used to "cheat" a lot more on my strokes, often opting to just punch the ball back, especially in tight spots. With poly, short and lazy strokes just don't have any pace or control, feel harsh, and cause a lot of errors. Also, when I tense up my arm, the impact is very uncomfortable, so I am forced to loosen my grip more and to swing more freely, rather than forcing the racket through the ball. All this is improving my game. It seems that poly strings provide a lot more feedback when you do something wrong. For a developing player, perhaps at 3.5 and below, who mishits often, I think you definitely risk injury, although you still get the benefit of getting good feedback. However, if you're almost there, in terms of having a full/fast stroke and being able to hit the sweet spot often, it seems like an great learning aide, plus you get lots of spin and control. Have you had a similar experience?
     
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  2. Lukhas

    Lukhas Legend

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    Reverse experience: you don't get a lot of free spin from other string types, so to generate as much effect, you have to hit much fuller, with longer swings.
    I noticed it when demoing two racquets in co-poly (Savage and RPM Blast) compared to my usual racquet with s-gut (Pro's Pro hex Multi/Dunlop Hexy Fiber). With the poly, just could hit late and watch the ball dipping into the court... Impossible with Hex Multi.
     
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  3. Bmr

    Bmr Rookie

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    The full bed of poly that I use (Gosen Polyquest 17) is almost unfair with regard to the groundstrokes. I hit a shot that should have been 3 feet out but it painted the line. Both of the people on the other side of the court looked each other and wondered how in the hell it dropped in. That being said, I really don't like the feel for touch game (volleys/drop shots, etc..)
     
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  4. roman40

    roman40 Rookie

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    The control is better, for sure, due to stiffness/spin, but it just feels very harsh to my arm if I don't make good contact, or if try to force the ball with my arm, rather than using momentum of the racket, as I would with full/fast stroke.
     
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  5. Ramon

    Ramon Hall of Fame

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    Poly definitely improves my game, but unfortunately it's short lived. After the first 2-3 matches, the poly starts to die. It loses spin and control, and it kills my arm. It's not worth it for me to re-string after every other match.
     
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  6. Carolina Racquet

    Carolina Racquet Hall of Fame

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    Poly is good for my game. I can hit harder and keep the ball in play without stringing the frame too high.
     
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  7. Lukhas

    Lukhas Legend

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    That's what Hex Multi does when it's brand new, especially on hard (Green Set) of all surfaces. It just dips on the line, pretty unfair to the returner. :neutral: Although it doesn't snap back and leaves bug holes in the string bed, so it's very limited in time.
     
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  8. roman40

    roman40 Rookie

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    I wouldn't call this an "unfair" advantage, given that this string is available to your opponent as well :)
     
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  9. Slitch

    Slitch Rookie

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    I have the same experience with nat gut. Because of the extra power I have to work on my form to keep the ball in.
    I do agree with you that with stiffer strings there is more feedback.
     
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  10. Lukhas

    Lukhas Legend

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    Most guys I hit with don't give a **** about their equipment. And a good portion of them still kick my @ss with months old strings and year old racquets. Them and me are better off taking some more lessons before worrying about which SW or balance or string gauge in fact... :lol:
     
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  11. roman40

    roman40 Rookie

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    At our club, most players I know are always considering switching rackets, but they rarely talk about strings. This is probably because very few folks have a stringing machine, so they don't have a chance to experiment with different strings/tensions.
     
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  12. Lukhas

    Lukhas Legend

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    Not untrue. I'm on my 5th job this year (starting last September, not a calendar year, 10th month yet). 10€ per job. The switch to s-gut saved my wallet compared to poly, or I'd be likely on my 8th job or more. Stuff is that I started playing much more than before this "year", so I'm starting to eat. I don't even break the strings, the tension loss is killing the strings before I have the opportunity to break. I'll start rolling PPA to save a bit. Had I known... Some people just play once a week, they don't care a single bit about strings. Why would they put some money in it?
     
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2013
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  13. ricki

    ricki Professional

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    I think that for learning proper game, multifilament string is best to develop good technique.

    I played with polys and it wasnt hard to keep ball in play "somehow".

    Now I have my Prince tour 18x20 strung with multifilament and I tell you: It is HARD to make good spin and power all in one. THe longer I play with it I feel that Im getting better and better, I believe that when I master hitting good topspin shots with it it will translate later in better game with poly. - just my few words
     
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  14. THESEXPISTOL

    THESEXPISTOL Hall of Fame

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    If you already are at a decent level poly usually takes your game to the next level. Especially the first times you play with it after you get used to syngut/multi. After a few hours happens what you described perfectly as the "poly lazyness". You start just counter-punching and not making a full swing.
    And after 4/5 hours you start getting frustrated because you just can't perform the way you did before, because poly strings lose their characteristics very fast.
     
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  15. roman40

    roman40 Rookie

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    Laziness is not a new thing for me, I just lose focus sometimes. Anyway, with poly, I just can't play lazy, because mishitting the ball, and not taking a full swing feels like crap, and at that point you just feeding your opponents with short balls, or similar presents. Mishitting also sends a shock through my arm, and even if it doesn't hurt, you know it's doing damage. With multi/gut string, you can take shorter, slower swings and still get decent power and depth, so there is less incentive to move/hit better, and less feedback.

    I haven't noticed any serious issues with degradation in 4 hrs, but I I've just started playing with full poly. I've got 6hrs on each racket so far, and while the mains are notched, they still move freely over the crosses. Tension loss is there, but I don't have any problems with control yet. We'll see how long that lasts. Overall, I like it better than poly/syngut combo, since syngut coating comes off by this time, and the mains can't slide over crosses anymore.

    But yeah, I think my game is noticeably better overall, more consistency, more spin, better angles, etc.
     
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2013
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  16. RogueFLIP

    RogueFLIP Semi-Pro

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    OP, agree with you!

    When I first hit with my setup below, it just felt right. I've improved leaps and bounds with my setup, although plenty of trial and error with gauges and tension.

    Fortunately, no arm issues.

    While I agree its a little harsh on the "feel" shots, it's forced me to loosen my grips and I've found that's helped tremendously on drop shots, volleys, plays at net.

    But I love the looks on people faces when they think the ball is sailing long so they disengage and then try to react when they see the ball lands it. :)
     
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  17. THESEXPISTOL

    THESEXPISTOL Hall of Fame

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    Not much more left, some polys just play ok and suddenly all the hell brakes loose and you just can't do anything with your shots.
     
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  18. roman40

    roman40 Rookie

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    I don't hit with extreme topspin, and although I can send a rocket once in a while, I usually opt for placement and consistency, with decent pace. I don't break strings either. I hope I can get at least 12 hours from each racket. If not, I guess I'll have to learn to string my rackets a little faster, and do it more often. I think I'd have a hard time giving up the benefits of poly, just to save time on stringing.
     
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