I want a new racquet that plays like my old racquet.

Discussion in 'Racquets' started by kuyaariel, May 15, 2008.

  1. kuyaariel

    kuyaariel New User

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    Sep 21, 2004
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    Hello all. I haven't posted on here in a LONG time. I found my "holy Grail" a few years ago and wanted to stop trying different racquets that never end up feeling quite as good. I also picked up a golf habit along the way. Anyways, I'm currently using the Estusa Power Beam (no pro or braided), the really flexible one, and it's currently strung with a luxilon poly, 18g. Unfortunealtey, these racquests (The company for that matter) have been discontinued. I'm also relizing that after long periods of time, I probably need a bigger hitting area than 93 sq inches. But, I love the feel of this racquet, and I've had a few older models before. Prostaff 6.0, head prestige, etc. The closest thing that felt like this to me was the Prince Original Graphite, 100. Felt great but couldn't get used to 110. And the midsize felt completely different. Too stiff. So I guess my requirements for a new racquet are, no bigger than a midsize (I might be able to do 98 sq in.), a must is a "box" cross section, similiar weight (over 21 oz) and I guess have a similiar stiffness rating (which I think was like 61 or 62)

    Man, sounds like a lot to ask, huh? I'm not brand loyal and minimal graphics would be nice. Any suggestions? Oh, and suggestions from people who actually hit with the estuse power beam would be great!
     
    #1
  2. Pleepers

    Pleepers Professional

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    Kinda hard to find the traditional box beam anymore. You might want to look at either the Donnay or Becker frames. Good luck :)
     
    #2
  3. fuzz nation

    fuzz nation Legend

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    If you're rounding up some demos, the Head MG Prestige mid could be worth a try along with the mids from Volkl and Becker. I often use the Prince NXG mid which I find to be one of the more flexible racquets around. Given its heft and dense string pattern, it still gives me plenty of power, spin, and control despite its softer feel - I like mine strung in the high 50's with 17 ga syn gut or multifiber.
     
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  4. dabudabuda

    dabudabuda Rookie

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    Probably the best suggestions...and maybe include volkl. These 3 have the graphite/fiberglass makeup like your estusa but only the donnay is box beam.
     
    #4
  5. matchmaker

    matchmaker Hall of Fame

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    I don't think any racquet is similar to the Power Beam. BTW do you have the 16X19 version or the 18X20. I have one 18X20 RA 61 version in a fairly good state. If you need one more you can always drop me a mail at bverplancke@hotmail.com.

    The racquet which I found to be similar and actually better is the Wilson Reflex (of which I own three), also a discontinued model. It's basically the same mold as the PS 6.0 but a different beam width (19mm) and different layup (only graphite). It plays like a dream. It is quite flexible and still has a lot of power if you can hit the sweetspot. On my best days I feel like I can put the ball anywhere I want on the court and it serves and volleys heavenly.

    I really do not think that any modern racquet plays like an Estusa. From far there might be a ressemblance between the Volkl VE mid, it has that same old school feel, but it also has a longer and somewhat more narrow sweetspot than the Estusa. I don't know how the DNX 10 compares to the Estusa. Maybe someone else can compare them. Basically the Estusa is an old school frame and from what I understand the DNX material is rather pingy.
     
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  6. Abriano

    Abriano New User

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    Jan 1, 2007
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    the string bridge of the estusa is quite heavy, maybe the becker 11 mid with about 3g of lead at 6 o┬┤clock would have a similar feel
     
    #6

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