If I'm 21 and attend college for the first time can I still play for the team?

Discussion in 'College Tennis Talk' started by dwhiteside, Sep 1, 2009.

  1. dwhiteside

    dwhiteside Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2008
    Messages:
    438
    Haven't been yet, I'm 21, but I'm considering going for next fall semester (taking sats in oct) - will I be allowed to play for a team? (div 3 probably)
     
    #1
  2. tennismom42

    tennismom42 Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2008
    Messages:
    691
    One article says 21, the other says 24. I'd believe the first one as it's from the NCAA. Divisions II and III are higher. But the number of years you can compete may be limited. (Also, if you want to go for Division II or I, you better get started on the Clearinghouse process -- it takes forever!) Otherwise you seem to be OK age for Division III.

    Here are the two link:

    http://www.ncaa.org/wps/ncaa?ContentID=420

    http://www.sport-scholarships.com/english/sportdivisions.htm
     
    #2
  3. dwhiteside

    dwhiteside Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2008
    Messages:
    438
    Thanks a lot Tennismom! What's the Clearinghouse process, in short?
     
    #3
  4. Puddy

    Puddy Rookie

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2009
    Messages:
    123
    Hmmm.

    I could be wrong, but as long as you haven't attended college beforehand, your age is not an issue. Once you start playing officially, the clock starts ticking and you have four (or five) years of being able to play. One issue is IF your college years are interupted by military service, the clock starts ticking once again when you again start attending school or being officially discharged from the military. I could be wrong (most likely), but I read about a lady who came to play college ball after serving several years in the US Army, went on to be part of some college team that did relatively well and somebody desputed her eligability and it was decided that she was fair-and-square to play and all was legit (again, I could be very wrong).

    Keep us posted?
     
    #4
  5. tennismom42

    tennismom42 Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2008
    Messages:
    691
    The NCAA Clearinghouse is necessary to play Division I or Division II. It's a governing body that qualifies college athletes to be neither too stupid nor too professional. So a freshman must have a minimum core GPA* plus minimum SAT or ACT scores, plus a variety of other things to prove amateurism. * Core GPA is different than a school's GPA. It considers only certain 16 courses.

    Also, the player cannot be too close to a pro. They can't have played more than 8 pro tournaments in the past year, etc. They have to red shirt a year sometimes if they are closer to being a pro than an amateur. Red shirt means sit out a year.

    Again, it's for Division I & II.
     
    #5
  6. 10isDad

    10isDad Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2006
    Messages:
    1,560
    Because of the issues with amateurism and (mostly) foreign players who take a couple years to try out futures/challengers, finding out they can't quite cut it so decide to get a free/discounted education instead, there are issues with age and loss of eligibility depending on the time between high school and college.

    Haven't looked in a while, but I thought a player had a 1 year grace period following high school graduation, after which he/she lost a year of eligibility for each year post-graduation. Obviously, there are caveats, as Grand Canyon University in Phoenix had a 50+ year old woman who played a couple years ago. She played when she first went to college back in the 70's and still had a year of eligibility left when she returned to college in the 2000's.
     
    #6
  7. tennismom42

    tennismom42 Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2008
    Messages:
    691
    I heard that the class of 2009 was the last year that the 1-year grace period rule would be allowed.
     
    #7
  8. AndrewD

    AndrewD Legend

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2004
    Messages:
    6,581
    It's always very revealing when a person makes no mention of the universities, coaches and system which actively recruit those foreign players.
     
    #8
  9. tennisjon

    tennisjon Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2007
    Messages:
    764
    Location:
    West Orange, NJ
    As long as you never attended college before, you can play at the D3 level. There is a semester system at the D3 level, but the clock doesn't start in the same way it does at the D1 level when you graduate from college. There are many people around the country in the 30s and 40s playing college tennis because of this.
     
    #9
  10. killR4hand

    killR4hand New User

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2008
    Messages:
    42
    The Cal women need to be mentioned as one of the worst in that regard. :evil:

    1. Mari Andersson from Sweden - junior turned 23 July 2009

    2. Kasia Siwosz from Poland - senior turns 24 Feb. 2010

    3. Jana Juricova from Slovak Republic - sophomore turns 22 Dec. 2009

    4. Annie Goransson from Sweden - freshman turned 20 Aug. 2009
     
    #10
  11. ClarkC

    ClarkC Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2008
    Messages:
    3,767
    Location:
    Charlottesville, VA
    Check out the Ole Miss men's roster now that Devin Britton has turned pro. They only have five players on the roster (no doubt they are recruiting frantically for a foreign player to enroll in January). The five are from Germany (twins), Sweden, Norway, and South Africa. They might go a whole season with no Americans on the roster at all.
     
    #11
  12. nousername

    nousername Rookie

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2007
    Messages:
    317
    i don't know the official rules, but i do have 1 data point:

    during the 2008-2009 school year, the University of Minnesota (D1) had a 24yr old freshman player #1 singles.

    it was this guy:
    http://www.itftennis.com/mens/players/player.asp?player=10024422

    he had achieved a world ATP rank of #496 before school. since he was able to play, he obviously passed the "clearinghouse" procedure, which means his previous world rank wasn't high enough to have the NCAA consider him a "pro".
     
    #12

Share This Page