If racket tech is now advanced

Discussion in 'Racquets' started by ttwarrior1, Jan 29, 2013.

  1. ttwarrior1

    ttwarrior1 Professional

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    Then why aren't we all using new rackets. I'm playing with mt prince ttwariior is and wondering wtf would a newer racket would do
     
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  2. robbo1970

    robbo1970 Hall of Fame

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    It seems each year or so, the manufacturers come out with new ideas and materials that I expect many just believe are a fresh way to sell a racket. Same as putting on a new paint job. Whether these 'advancements' actually create improvements is rather debatable.

    Many players still stand by their previous model rackets because they prefer them. The classic examples being the pro's who use older models but updated with the latest PJ to satisfy their huge sponsorship deals.

    I personally love my Dunlop Bio's, but the new M and F series doesnt sound like it would be in my ballpark at all and the Classic range which seems to best resemble the Bio range just seems like a new PJ, so I wont bother changing to the new versions.

    I just think a lot of it is marketing and if you have a racket that is of good construction and it suits your game, its difficult to justify an 'upgrade' for the sake of it.

    Just my view though.
     
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  3. Relinquis

    Relinquis Hall of Fame

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    I use a 93" prince from 1990 and a Wilson Steam 100" i bought last summer. They just feel different from one another. My technical ability, fitness and mental attitude determine how well i do on the court.
     
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  4. robbo1970

    robbo1970 Hall of Fame

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    I would expect them to feel different, both very different rackets.

    I think the real test is comparing an older model with the newer one.
     
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  5. djdannyj25

    djdannyj25 New User

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    I have all of the AeroPro Drive generations and I think the only difference between racquets in the line is simply feel. I don't know whether its the new "technologies" that were implemented or just different weight distribution, but they all feel different.

    I think that's what new technology does to the frame, it alters feel ever so slightly as to make the racquet "different", even though it plays the same.

    I can easily switch between each APD because they are all essentially the same racquet, even the feel of each of the frames is pretty similar.

    New racquet tech will make very small changes to a racquet in order to increase revenue and sales.
     
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  6. mxmx

    mxmx Semi-Pro

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    Sometimes those small changes are what makes the difference. Companies like BMW and Merc don't change their whole brand identity in just one sitting like some
    other makes do. They improve on what they already have. This is what to me, makes wilson one of the better brands...even if its not my favourite brand. With rackets, feel can be a very important part of the overall experience. To me, one of the most important aspects of a racket is feel. If they can improve that, they are improving.
     
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  7. Say Chi Sin Lo

    Say Chi Sin Lo Legend

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    You know you can't say stuff like that here right? Forum members don't miss shots, it's the equipment's fault if they do miss shots.
     
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  8. TheBoom

    TheBoom Hall of Fame

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    Its mainly just the feel that changes I hit with the pure drive gt vs the non cortex one and they felt different but my shots were hit the exact same. Even hitting the different generations of prestiges or extremes or the Wilson 90in rackets they all hit there ball very similarly it is just the feel that is changed
     
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  9. ttwarrior1

    ttwarrior1 Professional

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    i thought the pros agree that the reason they are hitting harder, better etc is because of technology of rackets?
     
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  10. Timbo's hopeless slice

    Timbo's hopeless slice Hall of Fame

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    ok, had to happen, I actually agree with Relinquis!

    I use my Volkls for everything, coaching, tournament singles, league dubs, hit and giggle with non tennis family, and they are great.

    but I have an old 90" Slazenger from the late 80s that weighs a ton and flexes like a raw noodle. I love having an occasional hit with it, totally crushes the ball. Or, at least it feels like it does, but really my game is pretty much the same, and my level neither lifts nor drops.

    yes, there was a quantum shift in the 80s when graphite frames became the norm, but I really don't think there has been much real improvement since...

    frames have gotten bigger, then much bigger, then smaller again, now they have sort of settled at 95" - 100" for most players at any level.

    some folks like 'em heavy and soft, some folks like 'em light and stiff, and the bionic man likes the PDR, but the differences aren't that great, really.
     
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  11. fundrazer

    fundrazer Hall of Fame

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    From earlier reading in this section, OP is the guy who demoed 100 sticks and "didn't notice a difference."

    This isn't complicated. Newer racquets may have characteristics that some players like and will then make the switch to whatever racquet. Other players may demp and find out that they don't care for whatever racquet and stick with their current one.
     
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  12. Timbo's hopeless slice

    Timbo's hopeless slice Hall of Fame

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    oh, OP is a hideous player (no offence, man, but we have seen your vids), but that doesn't mean his point is invalid.

    also, he's playing with a pretty good stick, it isn't as if it's a 1988 Walmart Wilson aluminium!
     
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  13. Sander001

    Sander001 Hall of Fame

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    Because until there's tech that can break the laws of physics, then there are no actual advancements.

    And if these new materials were truly able to make racquets more comfortable, you'd see stiffness ratings of 80+.
     
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  14. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Yeah, the pros now hit harder because of the advantages of the new rackets with new materials.
    The new rackets are newer than 1990's.
     
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  15. Lilguy1456

    Lilguy1456 Semi-Pro

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    <<<sigh>>>
     
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  16. UCSF2012

    UCSF2012 Hall of Fame

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    Actually, they may agree that it's the technology of the STRINGS. But on a rec level, no technology will undo player incompetance. Consumers blame shift to meaningless technologies when it's they who don't know how to hit a tennis ball.

    If you don't know how to hit a tennis ball, no amount of graphene will change that.
     
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  17. Hi I'm Ray

    Hi I'm Ray Hall of Fame

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    Racket design and the available variety in the sub 12oz range has definately improved since the 90's IMO. Majority of material "tech" is marketing BS.
     
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  18. Absolute

    Absolute New User

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    i would say graphite was the biggest technology breakthrough
     
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  19. ttwarrior1

    ttwarrior1 Professional

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    Bump,,,,,,,
     
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  20. anubis

    anubis Hall of Fame

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    Find the best racquet FOR YOU, and then hit the courts as much as you can. The reason there's so many racquet choices is because everyone is different. We all need something different out of our racquets. You need to find what you need out of a racquet, and you can't tell that until you start playing with some different models.

    I played with over a dozen different racquets to find the one that works best for me.

    Then, once you find it, there's no replacement for actual play time. You have to invest time on the courts, and I'm not talking about match play either.
     
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  21. hersito

    hersito Rookie

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    When I hit with a head liquid metal MP I hit like a 3.0, when I switch to a Head Speed pro graphen I instantly hit like Djokovic, the thing is I'm shy and can't do it in front of people...
     
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  22. corners

    corners Legend

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    In general I think the tech is overrated. The fact that the best players in the world all play with frames designed 10-30 years ago confirms this.

    But I think that the manufacturers are constantly tweaking weight distribution and that this has an effect, but not a big one. They also seem to be playing around with stiffening hoops and throats in different combinations in an attempt to stabilize the racquet face without having to make it heavier. TennisMaverick, a high-level former player and coach, with some kind of association with Volkl, used to post here, and he would say that the addition of nano-carbon materials allowed for racquets to hit the same kind of shots that an old-school graphite racquet could, but with significantly less weight. He also said that these materials, which are stiffer than conventional graphite, allowed a player to more easily hit agressive balls on the rise. I presume this is because the racquet face twisted less, providing more fidelity and accuracy.

    It is interesting to read comments by the TW playtesting group. They recently reviewed the Yonex Vcore Tour 97, the 310 gram version. Despite having a low, 314, swingweight, Chris said the head was very stable and that he wouldn't add lead to the head if he were to switch to that racquet. Yonex has been playing around with strategically stiffening the throat recently, and for years has played with using nano-carbon and novel beamshapes to stabilize heads. Maybe these things do work to some degree.

    But again, if the impact was huge we would expect to see more top players, especially those ranked too low to make the big money, switch to these newer designs. But most of the guys ranked below 50 are also using old-tech racquets - paintjobbed Heads and Wilsons, and Pure Drives and APDs (which are also not really that much different now than they were ten years ago). My conclusion: It's still mostly about marketing and selling racquets. And the fact that the racquet companies are constantly abandoning last year's great new tech for this year's great new tech also doesn't give confidence. If last year's tech was so great and made such a big difference it wouldn't make sense to ditch it for this year's gizmo.
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2013
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  23. bluetrain4

    bluetrain4 Legend

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    It's mainly the racquet companies that tout technological advancement, obviously as a way to sell raquuets. Many TWers have been making fun of this practice for a quite a while.

    IMO, we're still in the era where the dominant "advancement" is the standardization of graphite and graphite composite frames. Thus, this era goes back nearly 30 years. Lots of tweaks along the way - lighter, stiffer, thicker beams, etc. (all options if you want them, but frames are still made that are heavier, less-stiff, thinner), but the fact remains that, should it suit you (or anyone else), you can still use an older graphite frame successfully and effectively. Just a couple of years ago I used a POG OS for a singles league season (just because I always wanted to try it) and it was great. My results didn't suffer, as I beat the people I normally beat and lost to people I normally lost to. So, I'd say your TT Warrior is plenty technologically advanced, but the manufacturer has no motive to market it as such, as it's an older model, cheap (in terms of price) frame. They want you to buy something else, something new, something more expensive.
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2013
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  24. max

    max Hall of Fame

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    Economics are a big factor here.

    If you are a racquet company, you have to SELL racquets to keep going.

    Graphite racquets can last and be good for many years, and there is a fixed and possibly diminishing number of tennis players, hence, there is a need to radically stir up constant demand for racquet product.

    Thus, "new technology" since in 2013, anything tagged with the word "technology" equates into being blessed by Jesus Christ Himself.

    Thus, racquets are sold.
     
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  25. TennisCJC

    TennisCJC Legend

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    I agree with consensus that tech innovations are overhyped in general.

    But, some rackets have been more innovative than others. Andy Roddick had a perfect racket for him with the Pure Drive and it was fairly innovative at the time.

    Also, Rafa's AeroProDr is a perfect choice for a baseline basher type and it was innovative for its time.

    It sounds like I am a Bab fan but I personally don't like the PureDr series or the AeroProDr series - just saying they are examples of innovations that did bring a fairly big change. Most of the changes from year to year are just subtle changes to feel, flex, weight and stiffness. Basically, if you like your current racket, you are not going to get much different by going to the new model.
     
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  26. NLBwell

    NLBwell Legend

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    The big change in racket technology was in the 1980's with graphite rackets. Many of the rackets the pros use are essentially the same as those. There was a big change in string technology with polyester strings that increased the spin/power ratio. This allowed not only more high-spin shots, but also allowed racket heads to become larger without losing control (less stringbed deflection). Therefore, the rackets of choice moved from 85-95 sq. in. to 95-100 sq. in.
    Perhaps very open stringed rackets like the Wilson Steam 99S will change things again. These are made possible by poly strings (so the stringbed is controllable) as well as strong and light graphite. It's possible it may completely change the game at all levels. It may, like the oversize Prince racket, change the game for many rec players, but have a small effect at the pro level. If I were looking at a new technology to try, that would be it.
     
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  27. kaiser

    kaiser Semi-Pro

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    Well said, Timbo!
     
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