If you could give ONE piece of advice...

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by qwertre, Jan 2, 2013.

  1. qwertre

    qwertre Rookie

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    If you could give one piece of advice to a young player (say high school) who wants to continue with tennis (perhaps play college ball), what would it be? Keep in mind these qualifications
    --only ONE
    --this hypothetical youngster would follow your advice to the letter, with any downfalls that could come with it
    --try not to make it "serve well," or "don't miss"
     
    #1
  2. Relinquis

    Relinquis Hall of Fame

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    Get good grades.
     
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  3. frenzy

    frenzy New User

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    Pay attention to decent warm up, it saves you a lot of misery :)
     
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  4. slowfox

    slowfox Professional

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    Play your game.
     
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  5. luvforty

    luvforty Banned

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    this one.......
     
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  6. atatu

    atatu Hall of Fame

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    Once you commit yourself, stick with it and don't get discouraged.

    I was one of those kids who thought all the other players were so much better than me and I figured I would never catch them. That was a mistake, I should have just stuck with it and took my losses and improved. In my 20's, after college, I worked hard and played every day and started beating all those former phenoms. By then, it was too late.
     
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  7. qwertre

    qwertre Rookie

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    Nice, but I was thinking a little more "game-related."
     
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  8. goran_ace

    goran_ace Hall of Fame

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    I know you said only one thing, but it was hard for me to pick between these two so I'll mention both:

    (1.) Play as many matches as you can. You can't spend all your time hitting fed balls or against a wall. Practice matches are ok, but at some point you have to get that exposure to the pressures of playing a real live match. If you aren't playing outside of the high school season (i.e. USTA tournaments), you better start asap. You have to get match-tough, you have to get match experience under your belt. As far as practice matches go, play against people of different levels and ages and learn to adapt your game.

    (2.) In football coaches talk about things like being an every down player and playing through the whistle. I'd like to see more teenagers take this kind of attitude onto the tennis court. Play every point like it counts. That means don't waste points on low percentage shots. That means don't give up on the point before it has truly ended. Don't dwell on what happened on the last point good or bad; that point is over and let's focus on the next one. Strive to maintain your intensity. You put in that kind of work and you will be rewarded in the long run. Effort can be a great equalizer. I've seen a lot of talented kids who were lazy and would routinely lose to players who were just willing to outwork them. I've seen kids lose matches before the first point was played because they thought they had no chance so they'd tank.
     
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  9. xAceofSpadesx

    xAceofSpadesx New User

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    1. You can never hit the ball too early.
    2. If all else fails, swing harder.
     
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  10. 5263

    5263 G.O.A.T.

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    To understand that you rally to get shorter, weak balls from the BL, and should
    execute on a high level when you have earned that shorter, weak ball.
    Learn that and all the things to master those issues.
     
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  11. luvforty

    luvforty Banned

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    what is the purpose of this ONE advice? for him to play better tennis? or have better college experience? or better future career?
     
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  12. qwertre

    qwertre Rookie

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    If you've got responses for all of those, why not put them in? I was originally thinking just for game purposes, but it's not as if it really matters.
     
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  13. luvforty

    luvforty Banned

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    hm ok -

    just a general comment that college tennis will be a great experience, and also a character builder for his future career - lots of successful people have college/pro competition backgrounds..

    as for the tennis itself, if there were a universal piece of advice that fits everybody, everybody would be already doing it lol.
     
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  14. max

    max Hall of Fame

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    For some reason it pains me to say this, but this really IS the advice. Learn how to force yourself to do things you don't want to do.
     
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  15. watungga

    watungga Semi-Pro

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    Treat the ball like its your favorite doll. Swing on it like asking your opponent not to hurt your ball. When its hit back to you, check if there's some damage to the ball before whacking it back. Do all these with just your telescopic eye and racquet.
     
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  16. morandi

    morandi Rookie

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    Make sure you train your mind as much as you train your body.
    A big part of winning in tennis is mental.
     
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  17. chatt_town

    chatt_town Hall of Fame

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    Ditto....you won't be playing much tennis without good grades. :)

    QUOTE=Relinquis;7092630]Get good grades.[/QUOTE]
     
    #17
  18. Headshotterer

    Headshotterer Professional

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    focus on every single ball, focus on impact, not where it goes
     
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  19. DeShaun

    DeShaun Banned

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    Isolating a particular stroke in practice is usually good for its development, but when you are developing your overall approach to playing and are finding 'your game,' take some time to get to know yourself and what it is really that makes you happy about playing; and then develop your strengths so that they will cover your weaknesses when you are eventually playing your game, as opposed to isolating your weaknesses for particularized development.

    So, building your strengths into weapons can obviate your need to face down your weaknesses in match play.
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2013
    #19
  20. anubis

    anubis Hall of Fame

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    Footwork. The best strokes in the world won't win you matches if you aren't where you physically need to be in relation to the ball.

    If you're waiting for the ball to come to you, then you're likely doing something wrong. YOU have to GO TO THE BALL.
     
    #20
  21. CoachingMastery

    CoachingMastery Professional

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    Learn all you can about the game.

    The idea of understanding the game to the point of mastery is a goal that carries over into grades, goal setting, even relationships and overall success. Because the concept of seeking understanding in anything carries over into all aspects of life. You learn to self-critique, you learn to evaluate, you learn how to handle failure and success because if you are sincerely looking to understand the game of tennis, all aspects of failure and success are contributions to this ultimate goal...not the other way around. You won't look at failure or success as the goal...so they won't hinder your development...only contribute to the ultimate goal.

    A person who is sincere about this goal won't let others deter them.

    And, through this understanding, all potential will be determined by this goal. Understanding the game will give the student the "why" and the "How" of doing things. (Not just the "how"...which is what players who are only 'success-oriented' tend to look for.)
     
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  22. dman72

    dman72 Hall of Fame

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    Find a frame you like and stick with it. Buy one or 2 more of the same frame and STOP!!

    Not the only piece of advice a new player can use, but one that everybody on the racquet forum especially needs to learn. I've got about 18 frames so spoken from experience. Give yourself a short time period, find a frame and resolve to never buy anything except that frame again for at least 5 years.

    If you are having problems with certain strokes or opponents and you aren't playing with an aluminum racquet from 1989, it's not the racquet.
     
    #22
  23. double barrels

    double barrels Rookie

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    everytime you play someone ask them what they think your weakest and strongest part of your game is
     
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  24. the hack

    the hack New User

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    aggressive feet make aggressive player
     
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