Inhouse stringing problems

Discussion in 'Stringing Techniques / Stringing Machines' started by lionel_101, Sep 12, 2013.

  1. lionel_101

    lionel_101 Rookie

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    Currently, our in-house stringing is done by on of the club pros who picks up the racquets and does them at home. There is no stringing machine or even strings at the club. The cost to the members runs from $35.00 on up depending on the string. They also add on more for every other little thing, like tubing and head tape. To me, it looks like maybe 6 -10 racquets a week.

    The problem is people are complaining about strings breaking to soon, tension being to far off (especially loose), poor quality of stringing and the high price and so on. Thus, members are going elsewhere or to other members that do it cheaper and better.

    The management wants to try and bring back the lost revenue from restringing by having members come back and having the club do it.

    My question, how would you guys do it. This would include, what to do from when you get the racquet to when they pay for it and any guarantees.

    Currently, they fill out a basic form and select what string, other general add ons they want and when they want it back. I don't think there is even a space for what tension they want.

    So, any ideas or maybe a link on how to run a good restringing service at a club for be greatly appreciated. I do know there is more to it then it seems, especially with pricing, but hope you can provide a lot of details.
     
  2. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

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    There is a country club not far from me, and if they were to contract me to string rackets for them I would charge $10 plus the cost of the string. I would guarantee 1 day service. What else do you need to know?
     
  3. lionel_101

    lionel_101 Rookie

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    Thanks, Irvin.

    That sums it up nicely. LOL
     
  4. diredesire

    diredesire Super Moderator

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    If the prices are $35+ at this place, they're making some pretty lush margins. $10 would be a pretty low start for a contract, IMO. ESPECIALLY if the 3rd party is supposed to be supplying string. Overhead ain't free! $15 labor sounds more inline with what I'd want to be charging with a $30 built in labor fee (club gets ~half!)

    Especially at the low volumes (6-10 a week?!), I'm not sure I'd be giving up my time for the money.

    My 2 cents.

    As far as guarantees go, at $10 a pop, I'm not guaranteeing anything. If someone's not satisfied, I'm not comping labor or string unless it's on the club's dime.


    As far as the original question, you seem to be asking primarily about the process, not really the details of the stringing itself. Unfortunately, both have to be considered, here.

    Process-wise, it's pretty straight forward. You can either poll your customers to find out what is lacking from the service they're currently receiving, or you can go with the standard: Revise/re-do your order forms, unless you've already got thousands printed. Have a standardized pricing list available, and clearly communicated. Show a labor fee (if a customer wants to bring their own string in), as well as "tiers" of string, OR just specific strings. For instance:

    $20 labor fee
    $25 Synthetic gut
    $30-35 Multifilament
    etc.

    OR
    $20 labor
    $25 Prince Synthetic Gut w/ Duraflex
    $45 Wilson NXT, etc

    I would be careful with "guarantees," the only premature breakage guarantee I will give is if a string is defective. A hard shank near the frame will break nearly any string if struck properly. This is not the fault of the stringer nor the string --> It is the fault of the player. If someone breaks their strings quickly, with obvious signs of use in the middle of the bed -- they likely chose the wrong string. If they truly don't know any better (which is unlikely, as they probably have been through the process at least once or twice), then the stringer/customer service may have led them astray. You can partially comp as you please in this situation, depending on the establishment.

    If the tension is off, that is not necessarily the fault of the stringer, although it should be shared. A good stringer should be polling and finding out what the customer is used to. If a customer is coming from a shop/stringer that uses a lockout/crank machine, they should be advising them on how to select a tension if they are using an electric/constant pull machine, for instance. I'll generally give the benefit of the doubt on the first try with me, but I do not comp strings, especially expensive ones. (I'll sometimes throw in a set of Gosen or something if they're a first time customer unhappy with the tension).

    Other than that, not much else is required.

    In terms of the current customers being unhappy with their current level of service, you should be educating them on how to identify a good or bad string job. If your pro sucks, find out why, correct it, or replace him. If he's burning strings, not straightening them, etc, that's his bad. If his machine is just way off, get a calibrator so he can check his machine occasionally.


    Overall, though, one thing I'd have is on-site service AND string stock.
     
  5. SwankPeRFection

    SwankPeRFection Hall of Fame

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    Find someone who's credible to string. It's obvious your "club pros" aren't very good stringers. Also, no one's going to take you seriously unless the club has a machine onsite. People get a good feeling knowing that their equipment isn't being taken to someone's home to get strung. If you want to be a professional club, be professional! Get a stringing machine and get some people who know how to use it or train them on it.

    There are some programs that some companies have where you can buy a machine at a discount from them and sell their string in your shop, etc. Gamma can set you up with a nice electric machine if you push their product/string all the time. Some places have gotten the machine at cost or for free, but they move a lot of product for them. Call them up and talk to their business sales. See what options they may have for your club knowing the direction you want to go into. Proper training on the machine would be nice and can be done when they bring it in to set it up for you if needed. Stringing isn't difficult nor is it magic. The problem with most stringers is that they don't do it right or they don't take their time to string customer frames like they would their own.

    Also, going the extra mile and cleaning the frames, etc. when stringing would be a nice gesture for the customer... and make sure you point out what you guys did to make the stringing that much better and worthwhile for the members. For example, when I get a stick to string from someone I know, I inspect it with them at time of pickup. We discuss things like grommet health, head guard health, etc. If all checks out and I don't feel anything needs to be replaced, the fee is $20 and you provide the string. If you need a grip replaced or anything, that's included in the price. What you get back is a throughly cleaned frame that's strung cleanly with everything lining up perfectly and if you had a grip you provided, that's installed and looks factory. Gamma black grip tape is installed instead of the goofy stenciled one you get with whatever grip you got. If you gave me grommets to install, what you end up getting back is a racquet that looks damn near factory fresh minus whatever banging up you did to the paint job. I don't touch that up, lol. But the frames are clean, all your clay dust is out of the grommet holes, etc. I think it's a pretty good deal for $20. Sure, it probably takes a bit more time to do it, but not as much as you think. It's the same thing I do to all my own frame... why wouldn't I do it for everyone else I string for? It's just good product and people value it.
     
  6. StringingIrvine

    StringingIrvine Semi-Pro

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    I agree with if you have a club i'd make sure you have a stringer on the stop. I'd maybe even offer emergency string jobs at a premium assuming a stringer is on staff.

    As silly as it sounds you could easily get some bags off e--bay and start wrapping finished rackets in them. I got a roll of 500 for less than 30 bucks and I feel its a real eye catcher.

    If the rackets are simply dropped off with a form there is no stringer-player contact it poses a huge problem. If strings are breaking prematurely it could be the stringers fault but it could also be the wrong string choice and tension. This is the reason I talk to all my clients before and after regarding tension maintenance, and durability of whatever string they are using. I do not offer guarantees but if something goes completely wrong i will do it, or if they are completely dissatisfied with one of my recommendations i'll redo the job and only charge them string cost.
     
  7. lionel_101

    lionel_101 Rookie

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    Thanks for the helpful feedback.

    It will be interesting to see what they do. I might mention what the people here have suggested to a manager friend there and maybe they can get their act together. Having a not so good and costly stringer, just gives them a black eye.

    Personally, for the low amount of racquets, the club probably shouldn't even offer restringing. Instead just let the members find a good stringer whether outside the club or another member inside the club.
     
  8. zapvor

    zapvor Legend

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    yea.......i would just not even bother. good advice in this thread though
     
  9. am1899

    am1899 Rookie

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    For what it's worth, let's say I was a member at the club in question. I would under no circumstances "be cool" with my racquet(s) leaving the club to be strung - even if I knew the person who was taking them. What if my racquets get stolen out of the pro's car, for example?

    First thing I would want to do is put out a survey to the members - to get some data...find out what their needs are. Next order of business for me would be developing a business plan for a stringing business / pro shop to be run out of the club. One of the cornerstones of course would be that all racquet service would be done on site.

    If the objective is to bring more revenue into the club, to me opening a pro shop is a no-brainer. Of course, not all clubs are going to want or be able to take this on. But, if the manager(s) running the club don't have space for a stringing machine in the club, then they shouldn't complain about negative feedback from members about the current stringing service. It's hard enough to control everything that's going on on your own property. But it's damn sure difficult to control a process that happens off site.
     
  10. lionel_101

    lionel_101 Rookie

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    Just curious as to what you think of the following prices and if reasonable. If not, what would you charge if you where stringing for the club?

    1. Stringing with user's string at $30.00

    2. Stringing with various stringer supplied strings from 35.00 to 45.00

    3. tubing 5.00 first one, and 3.00 after

    4. grip installation with user grip 10.00.

    5. Head tape 5.00

    6. 3 plus day turnaround, 15.00 more for under 3 day

    7. Grommet set 25.00
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2013
  11. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

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    I think your prices are outrageous.
     
  12. Wikky

    Wikky Rookie

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    Not at the country clubs. Its worth the extra 20 bucks than having to go drop off and pick up somewhere else to them.
     
  13. 4sound

    4sound Semi-Pro

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    I think those prices are a bit on the high side.
    Especially for extra $ (under 3 day turn around) if the average is 6-10 rackets per week. I could do 10 in half a day easy.

    This is what I typically charge:
    $20 customer provided string or I use synthetic (Prince Syn Duraflex 16g or 17g)
    $25-$30 (depends on string) Poly, multi, kevlar, hybrid, etc...
    $60 Natural gut
    $25 racket matching (1st racket, $15 each additional)

    $20 Grommet replacement
    $1 if tubing is needed.
    $5 Grip replacement (customer provided)
    $10 Grip replacement

    I typically get it done next day, never over 3 days

    There's another guy I know that will pickup and drop off next day to your house, same prices as me, no extra charge for delivery. His consistency and quality is top notch.
     
  14. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

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    Well then the CC can make $20/racket doing nothing. At 6-10 rackets a week that's an average of 8. 8x52x$20 = $8,320/year. The CC could afford to buy a nice stringer and have a MRT train someone to string the rackets. They may even be able to buy a racket diagnostic center and ERTs to provide some value added services. And did I mention everything over and above normal stringing is just gravy?

    No wonder there are so many home stringers stringing rackets. Some good, some not so good.
     
  15. David 110

    David 110 New User

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    Lots of speculation in this thread. I think diredesire has the most realistic numbers, but my experience with club stringing is a bit dated. This seems like a good case for a little market research by lionel 101 or others who might be interested. Call 5 or 6 clubs (both country and dedicated tennis clubs) and check their stringing prices. That would at least add some current data to the discussion. You might also get some insight into the diplomacy required to keep club members happy which has be to be factored into the cost.
     
  16. newpball

    newpball Legend

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    $35 or up for a string job is ridiculous.

    Does a club need to be in the stringing business? I think not, leave it up to the market to do stringing, people are not idiots and if they need a string job they can find out where and for what price they can get it done.

    The only exception is if the club wants to perform an onsite string service for immediate restring jobs, obviously that comes at a premium, because the machine takes space and someone needs to be onsite.
     
  17. stringmaster

    stringmaster Banned

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    I agree if they dont have an inhouse stringer dont string at all.
     
  18. SwankPeRFection

    SwankPeRFection Hall of Fame

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    You're out of your mind, especially with #6. lol :rolleyes:

    Changes in red...
     
  19. Overdrive

    Overdrive Legend

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    Sorry, but some of you 'stringers' are ripping people off and have no skills in customer service/business management.

    $5 for head tape? Lol, I can by a 660 FT roll of tape for $17 shipped. Hell, I can wrap the whole racquet if I wanted to.

    Grip installation for $10...? Seriously?? This is one of the reasons why American rec tennis is failing due to it being some expensive. Either no one wants to learn on their own or people don't take the initiative in helping others with their equipment. If I want my racquet strung, I'm recommended to take it to Joe instead of buying a basic drop weight. You can learn how to string, wrap racquets, customize racquets, etc. on the internet.

    You can string a racquet in around 15-45 minutes (skill varies), paying $15 extra for a quick string job is BS.

    Nice scams you people are pulling. It's sad that people pay for it too..
     
  20. lionel_101

    lionel_101 Rookie

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    I hope you don't think it is me setting these prices, because it is not. I have to agree that they are high and just wondered what other stringers thought about it. I guess that is what happens when the stringer and club have to split the money.

    I am just a member that long ago starting restringing his own racquets for under 2.50 each, just because of this.

    Please reread my original post.
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2013
  21. newpball

    newpball Legend

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    If that is true why are you so concerned about it? :confused:

    You wrote:

    The management wants to try and bring back the lost revenue from restringing by having members come back and having the club do it.

    My question, how would you guys do it. This would include, what to do from when you get the racquet to when they pay for it and any guarantees.


    And you are not part of the management but instead someone who strings his own rackets? :?

    Also why even after people wrote that $35 is too much you sill try to 'set' a reasonable price.
     
  22. lionel_101

    lionel_101 Rookie

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    Good questions.

    I guess I like my club and like the members. If the club had a good stringer and reasonable prices for restringing, those members that don't string for themselves would probably be glad to support the club.

    I was just asking what other people here that might know how to run a stringing operation in a club would do and what are fair and reasonable rates to charge.

    I do think some of you misunderstood what I was trying to say, which is typical for a written forum, instead of face to face conversation.

    If I could, I would probably like to remove this entire post and restrain from posting anything again.
     
  23. Dags

    Dags Professional

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    I play at a club where there isn't a stringer. If there had been one, I probably would never have bought my own machine; the convenience of having that service where you play should not be underestimated.

    As I suspect is clear by now, the key focus should be on getting a good stringer and bringing the service onsite. After that...

    - Unless it is extremely common that members provide their own string, I would drop this option. One of your issues is string breaking prematurely; if you don't know where the string came from or how it has been stored, it can be harder to temper this. If the club is sourcing string, then they can negotiate cheaper prices with the supplier, which can either be passed on to members or act as a layer of profit.

    - Charging for tubing is awkward, unless the racquet is examined upon receipt. I'm assuming that at a club the racquet will often be given to reception / a coach / another member of staff rather than directly to the stringer. The member will have seen the price list and so have an expectation of the cost; coming back to find it is an additional $5 is potentially an unwelcome surprise. I would lean towards tubing for free, but upon pick up advising the member that next time the racquet is strung it will require a new grommet set.

    - 'Free' grip installation should be provided with grips bought from the club. Again, the profit is in the markup of the goods.


    If it becomes apparent that progress isn't being made, then an alternative is to develop a relationship with a reputable local store. I used to play at a club that had a very small clubhouse, so no room for many onsite services. They developed a partnership, and once a day someone from the shop would stop by to pick up / drop off racquets. They left a small quantity of consumables - balls, grips, dampeners etc. - at the club so that these could be purchased quickly. Members also received 10% off whenever they shopped at the store by showing their membership card, so the shop received an increase in trade for apparel and racquets. I think they were even experimenting with a demo programme when I left.
     
  24. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

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    Assuming you have a stringing machine and a trained stringer on site, let me ask a dumb question. I drop off my racket and you tell me if I want it in three days it is $35 but if I want it by tomorrow it is $50. I watch you sit around and talk for three days then string my racket in 20 minutes. Do you think I'll be back?

    You're averaging 1 racket a day why should I have to pay extra to get me racket done when you have nothing to do? When someone drops off a racket they should be told when they can get it back. If they want to expedite the work there may be a charge warranted.

    Seems to me like you just pulled some numbers out of a hat.
     
  25. Dags

    Dags Professional

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    ^^With that low a volume of racquets, the club won't have a stringer on site full time. In fact, the stringer probably won't be there much at all - you're likely looking at one or two sessions (morning, afternoon or evening) per week.

    If you happen to time it badly, it could easily be 3 or more days before the stringer is due in. For that reason, I can see why the OP was floating such a long turn around, but also considering how to handle circumstances where the member requires something quicker. Effectively, I guess the potential additional cost for a 'rush job' is a callout fee to get the stringer there outside of his usual shift pattern. In general I would agree with you though Irvin - when a customer drops off the racquet, they could expect to be told when it will be done.

    With these low volumes, the more I think about it, the more I think you'd be better off trying to come to an arrangement with a local shop.
     
  26. lionel_101

    lionel_101 Rookie

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    Again, I don't know if you are talking to me or some one else...

    If me, there is no onsite stringer person (does it from his home) or a stringing machine at the club. The numbers I mentioned are from the form people fill out when turning in their racquets. No reason why I would make up all of this stuff.
     
  27. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

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    Some others are assuming a $30 string charge and an on site machine. If you're just stringing two or 3 days a week off site then a 3 day wait is not out of line.
     
  28. David 110

    David 110 New User

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    lionel 101, this info might be helpful. Location is Texas

    Upscale Country Club
    Labor (customer provided string) $19
    Babolat Addiction $33
    Prince Premier SoftFlex 17 $36

    Typical Country Club
    Labor $18
    Synthetic gut $25
    Wilson NXT $36

    Local major University Tennis Shop
    $15 Labor
    Synthetic Gut $25
    Wilson NXT $36

    Public Tennis Club
    Not open today

    In each shop, the pros string in their spare time on machines located in-house. Turnaround is typically one day – sometimes same day. Volume in each shop is higher than your situation. The numbers are real – talked to the pro in each shop.
    The public tennis club was not open today, but I can check tomorrow if that would be helpful although their prices will likely be in line with the university shop.
     
  29. lionel_101

    lionel_101 Rookie

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    Thanks for the info David.

    Those prices seem really reasonable with great turn around times.

    Do you know if the Pros (stringer) and the club split what they make on each racquet or do they just work for the club and it is part of their job to string racquets.
     
  30. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

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    At one time I strung for a county parks and recreation and the prices were about the same. I paid the P&R $3 / racket for stringing. For grips, overwraps, and grommets I paid nothing. I included stencils, tubing, cleanup, power pad, and head protection tape at no charge.
     
  31. zapvor

    zapvor Legend

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    ok here is the thing. talk tennis is not the best place to have this question. why?

    1. most people here on talk tennis are very very well informed. too informed actually. they know all about the latest rackets, gear, etc etc. they know where to get the best deals.

    2. these same people on talk tennis are not the target of your club. the club players mostly dont know much, and dont really care. they just want convenience. in fact, cost is not a main concern. as long as its not crazy. $45 for a string job is nothing. i know this because in my area there are a ton of upscale clubs. some you cant even apply to get in.

    3. geography. just because it cost $20 in texas, doesnt mean squat in ny. how much is a bagel or slice of pizza in kansas. $2? maybe 2.50? that slice in NY is easily $4. its like going to a football game. your beer just became $8 for 16oz.

    so the prices you set should reflect what your area/ demographic allows, not what we are telling you on here.
     
  32. Bdarb

    Bdarb Hall of Fame

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    or somewhere else..

    I think I should open a pro shop in his town. five bucks for head tape :shock:hahahhaa. I guess nothing in life is free.
     
  33. merlebo02

    merlebo02 Rookie

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    Incentives!!! For instance get your 10th stringing job free + cost of string.

    String 3 at one time get 4th free!!

    Make people think they are getting a great deal!!
     
  34. struggle

    struggle Hall of Fame

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    The market dictates the prices (assuming all else is equal).

    Sounds to me that the club pro/stringer is incompetent?
    If so, how is the club going to remedy THAT?
     
  35. diredesire

    diredesire Super Moderator

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    Revenue would increase, but operating costs would go WAY up, especially if you are turning it into a small pro-shop. Most pro shops aren't making their money on strings and stringing, you're going to be making more profit on apparel/shoes, etc. Implementing a full blown shop ain't cheap, and start up costs are pretty high -- it's something that would have to be heavily scrutinized. You can run really, really lean (for a few Gs) and get a start, but once you start attracting customers, you start attracting more and more special requests -- this leads to having to stock (multiple) sets or reels of what is being requested. It blows up really quickly, IMO.

    Prices, ASSUMING you have a trained "professional" on staff (Certified or MRT)

    1) Labor fee is very high, but at a club, it isn't absolutely outrageous, as long as the service and turnaround is of a good level. IMHO 20-25 is more reasonable. If you want to attract more people (which may or may not be the point) then you should try to compete a little harder.

    2) Prices for stringer selected strings seem reasonable. Don't pad your prices too hard, justify your overhead, but when I'm paying more than a buck or two OVER TW prices, I'm going to start buying my own string. When I buy my own string, I start looking at labor costs. Then I start looking at stringing machines, etc. (Like zap said, though, this is the wrong audience)

    3) Tubing should be free unless you're inspecting AND have grommet sets on hand. I wouldn't charge more than a buck or so for it. It's not hard to snip off a short length of tubing and thread it onto a string. Tubing is very rare these days, anyways. Having a few feet coiled up in a drawer is extremely low cost to the club. No need to gouge customers on tubing.

    4) Grip installation: $5. Free if purchased at the club (more overhead). This again assumes someone who is trained and can do this stuff in their sleep. I'd consider the $5 a tip, and refuse additional tips here. This is more a sign of respect of the technician's time than anything else. If they're at the level where they've got a nice tacker (staple gun) and are installing adhesive-less leather grips or something, then I'd feel the $5 is OK.

    5) Head tape: Sell it by the foot at 100% profit (AKA a few bucks to rip it off the reel). Put it on and consider the money a tip. It should be a value-add rather than a service. Keeps people happy and respecting your business.

    6. If you can justify staffing, a rush job should be on-site in front of you for additional (if someone has to drop things they're doing to do that, it's an opportunity cost, and is reasonable. $15 extra is a little rich for my blood, though). This all depends on whether or not you can staff. Otherwise -- there's a notice on stringer schedule, and the stringer needs to honor this schedule, at least 2x a week.

    7. Grommet set 25.00[/QUOTE]


    Prices seem pretty fair, but grommet replacement seems pretty insane. I don't stock BGs, though, so if you had to pre-order every time (with shipping), I can see why prices are the way they are. If you buy from TW in one-off orders, you can request first-class shipping by phone, which should save you several dollars, FWIW.

    While I agree with the first part of your post, I find it especially grating that you have to accuse this type of behavior and put a political/economic spin on it. I feel that you've always got this doom and gloom viewpoint on society -- you should also know that this is simple capitalism, and if people pay the prices, then there's not too much else to say about it -- it's the model we live in.

    I think you're reading too far into the feedback you're getting. If you really do want to remove this thread, though, you can simply report your OP. I think people don't have the whole picture, and they're asking for more information (which is something that has to be staggered in time, due to the medium). You should be providing an excess of context if you want to avoid this -- it's nothing personal ;)

    Agree with most points -- it's never OK to surprise people with charges (tubing) without letting them know first. This only impedes the work flow. Joining forces with a local shop is a pretty good idea in the way you frame it.
     
  36. diredesire

    diredesire Super Moderator

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    Went over the character limit:

    Yep, there's no catch-all solution here, unless OP's club is willing to make major changes. It looks like the profit sharing is actually hurting the growth and customer base. If they want to make things better for their customers, they have to make some difficult decisions. It's all speculation at this point.

    Also understand, though, that Texas/Cali/Florida are pretty rich/saturated with tennis players/communities. This implies that there's a lot of competition among service providers. The prices will remain flat and competitive in those locations even as materials costs increase. This is actually a bad thing for the service providers. If OP is in an area where the club is actually the most convenient location, they can charge a premium, and shouldn't absolutely feel guilty in doing so. We should all keep this in mind. If the people who frequent the club have to travel half an hour+ to the pro shop, drop off frames, and then make the SECOND trip to pick it up a day or two later, that's fuel money and time cost that can be absorbed into the service fee.

    Most times at a pro shop, the staff is paid their hourly wage, and each frame completed is a flat rate bonus, from what I understand. Others can chime in if there's a different setup.

    When I strung for a 'club'/university, I was paid flat rate per frame.
     
  37. lionel_101

    lionel_101 Rookie

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    Thanks diredesire and to everyone else for their comments and suggestions.
     
  38. newpball

    newpball Legend

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    I rather keep in mind that $35 remains totally outrageous.

    Frankly I do not understand why a moderator needs to step in to put people here in their place.
     
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2013
  39. diredesire

    diredesire Super Moderator

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    Uh, I'm just posting my thoughts on the topic. I didn't "put anyone in their place." (This is by far my favorite sub-forum...)
     
  40. newpball

    newpball Legend

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    Ok, I see, sorry it seems I reacted a bit too quickly.

    I generally would recommend for moderators to have their private accounts in addition to a moderator account so there is no confusion between personal opinion and moderator directives.

    Just my 2c.
     
  41. zapvor

    zapvor Legend

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    yea i am not sure where you got that idea.......everything DD said was pretty much logical.
     
  42. CurrenFan

    CurrenFan Rookie

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    I think your price list, by itself, answers your question about why people want to get their racquets strung elsewhere. Add in the issues about the quality of the stringing, and the only reason I can imagine to get one's racquet strung through your club is laziness about finding any alternative.

    Seriously, charging $10 for grip installation labor alone, something that pro players do themselves so quickly they can easily do it during a changeover break? Or are you talking about original grip replacement rather than overgrip application? If the latter, that takes what, about 2-3 extra minutes? (please correct me if I'm wrong - I've never replaced an original grip, but it doesn't seem too complicated).
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2013
  43. struggle

    struggle Hall of Fame

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    The moderators are here to participate as well as "police".

    Here, he is just participating and a good one DD is.

    Otherwise, this would likely a "pay"/membership site.

    No thanks.
     
  44. am1899

    am1899 Rookie

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    All very true. For me, that's where a survey would be helpful to get a feel for a level of interest - what is it the members really want? Then it's a question of whether or not the club wants to get involved in a solution (and whether or not they are in the financial position to do so).

    This sums up the entire argument. Well said.
     
  45. zapvor

    zapvor Legend

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    you will be surprised at how many people cant replace their grip. try it
     
  46. lionel_101

    lionel_101 Rookie

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    I have seen a few people try and go from the top to bottom and wonder what they have done wrong. Other have problems making the angle cut at the top of the grips, so in comes out flush.
     
  47. Overdrive

    Overdrive Legend

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    TW has instructions at the TW learning center.
     
  48. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

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    Not me, seems to me anyone can replace a grip but very few can do it right. What surprises me is some people can't even put on an over grip correctly.
     
  49. Rabbit

    Rabbit G.O.A.T.

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    Being left-handed, it took some practice for me to wrap grips right-handed. Once you get a few done, it's really like second nature.
     
  50. struggle

    struggle Hall of Fame

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    being a righty I've never given it much thought and have never wrapped one for a lefty. seems stock rackets all come righty? and do most lefties re-wrap it the other way?

    I understand why, just never had to consider it.
     

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