Injuries from Over-stringing

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by user92626, Mar 26, 2008.

  1. user92626

    user92626 Legend

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    Can you get injuries from stringing too many lbs?
     
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  2. chess9

    chess9 Hall of Fame

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    Do you mean from playing with a racquet strung, say, at 80 pounds?

    Yes.

    -Robert
     
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  3. user92626

    user92626 Legend

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    hi chess,

    Theoretically, that's my question.

    Realistically I've strung 63 or 65 lb back when I didn't know anything about tennis, and now I feel like hitting with solid wooden surface. It definitely requires me to swing harder for the ball to move. In addition this racquet is head-heavy.

    I'm thinking to restring it to 58 or even 55.
     
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  4. watermantra

    watermantra Rookie

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    Most would agree that stringing a racquet with high tensions could lead to elbow/shoulder/wrist tendon problems. If you're not getting soreness now, I wouldn't change.
     
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  5. Loco4Tennis

    Loco4Tennis Hall of Fame

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    here is what i think on this
    reason why it hurts its because of the impact that is tranfered to your arm when the force of the ball is greater then the force you generate from your swing
    poeple who use poly strings, at all tensions from what i have read, say that when they swing short stubby shots, without good form will feel overtime the pain, while people who swing full complete strokes will generate the necessary force to impart the will on the ball, hence the transfer of energy is lower in your arm and more severe on the ball
    so in theary, you can hit a tennis ball with a 2x4 with a full swing and you will not notise arm pain, but if you let the same ball hit the 2x4, you will feel that pain on your arm
    a good example of this is baseball, thats a hard ball coming at a crazy speed, if you swing away, it will be ok, if you let it hit the bat, your arm is gonna take all the impact
     
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  6. Spittle

    Spittle New User

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    I am suffering first-hand from doing this exact thing. I switched from my older Head Craptastic(tm) racquet to a 8.9oz Wilson with poly strings strung around 59lbs. I *loved* the way it gave me control and placement since I already have a huge swing.

    However, over time, I encountered shoulder impingement syndrome, 'golfers elbow', and some kinda wicked pain (from vibration over time) in my lower hand. Since I completely stopped playing tennis around 2 mos ago, the hand pain is gone, the elbow pain is 80% gone, and I'm undergoing PT for my shoulder. Most of the doctors and players I've spoken with agree that the light/stiff racquet coupled with the poly strings definitely didn't help anything.

    When I get back to tennis, I'm getting a heavier racquet with softer/gut strings.
     
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  7. user92626

    user92626 Legend

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    Loco,
    That's a good explanation. Thanks.

    In short you can't mess around with heavily strung, heavy frames because the amount of energy needed to utilize them is great and so can the damage if improperly used.

    With that said I'm going to restring my racquet to 55. I just feel money wasted with the first time. :)
     
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  8. Litmstr10

    Litmstr10 New User

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    Stringing the racquet at a lower tension should help to prevent injury. You mention not messing around with "heavy frames" as well. There is some controversy regarding racquet weight (static and swingweight) and the prevention of arm injuries, but in my opinion, using a heavier racquet (to a point of course) can actually be better for arm health. I read a great thread on this about a month ago. Flexible racquets can also help prevent injuries (absorb shock better, etc).
     
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  9. vinhextreme

    vinhextreme Banned

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    too high is too stiff man
    go below 60
    i go for 58
     
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  10. Jackie T. Stephens

    Jackie T. Stephens Professional

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    Thats why you always go with Wilson.
     
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