Interesting interview with Uncle Toni

Discussion in 'General Pro Player Discussion' started by Luminaire, Sep 24, 2013.

  1. Luminaire

    Luminaire Rookie

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    #1
  2. objectivity

    objectivity Banned

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    "Next, the tennis that they played…I think that the US, in general, and not just in tennis, they prefer their sport to be not so thoughtful. A game of “bang, bang, bang,” and goodbye. They like an ace, a service winner, something spectacular…but tennis has other variables."

    truth statement of the year.
     
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  3. firepanda

    firepanda Professional

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    Bumpity-bump. This is a very good interview, if you take time to read it. Especially since people love posting outrageous out-of-context comments on here.
     
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  4. marc45

    marc45 Hall of Fame

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  5. cork_screw

    cork_screw Hall of Fame

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    Yeah, I think when they were interviewing top 10 guys and asking them what makes a top 10 player vs an average player or someone in qualies moving up the ranks, the most unanimous response was that the younger guys had no patience. They were just a bit too eager trying to hit winners as opposed to constructing points. And I also believe that since I've been to qualifiers and seen how they play. But yes, the next generation of players will probably take a lot from what the top tier guys from this generation has given (to the youth) and that's probably doing more thinking while you're actually playing instead of what you see from guys who just like to aim for kill shots. Nadal stretches out a point or he can dictate by moving you off the court.
     
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  6. terribleIVAN

    terribleIVAN Semi-Pro

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    Uncle Tony obviously likes the fame and the attention of being part of RAFA's team.

    This interview confirms he's simply a glorified motivational aide,
    and doesn't have a clue of what it takes to win because he never lived a pro sport life.

    If he trully likes Rafa more than the fame he brings to him, he should step down and make way for a real tennis coach who knows the places you need to visit in order to stay at the top.

    Rafa lost 7 straight finals to Nole, 3 of them slams ( he should have 16 slams instead of 13) because he couldn't adapt the right strategy and stopped improving in his game.

    He's now beating Nole simply because Nole can't sustain his 2011 form; it's clearly a case of Nole playing worse rather than Rafa playing better.

    But go tell that to uncle Tony.
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2013
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  7. octobrina10

    octobrina10 Hall of Fame

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    Nole was beating Rafa in 2011 simple because Rafa was mentally burned out after his successful year. He looked lethargic on the court. He looked like he wanted to get off the 'ATP carousel' and go fishing to Mallorca instead. He has mentioned many times that he had missed an ordinary life of an ordinary guy of his age. It seems that his passion for tennis has returned after spending seven months in Mallorca.
     
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  8. Backspin1183

    Backspin1183 Legend

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    Did you even read the interview?
    Re Nole-Nadal, true Nole isn't as dominant as he was in 2011 where he won a lot of close fought matches. Nadal though is a better player now than he was in 2011. Those who wonder what's happened to Novak's BH DTL don't know that Novak now finds Nadal unpredictable. Nadal isn't following his point patterns from 2011 any longer and trying to finish off points quickly going DTL more often which is troubling Novak.
     
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  9. terribleIVAN

    terribleIVAN Semi-Pro

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    I've read the interview and found nothing that would convince me uncle Tony is, in any way, shape or form qualified to be a coach to a player of Rafa's caliber.

    But uncle Tony sure likes to think he is.

    Rafa might have made a few adjustments, but these didn't count for much when Novak found his game in the second and beginning of the third set in USO.

    He simply blew Rafa off the court, exactly like he did in 2011. Where were Rafa's improvements then ??
     
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  10. Backspin1183

    Backspin1183 Legend

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    Where was Novak's game when Nadal dominated him in the first set? Why did he wait till Nadal drop his level to assert himself? Rafa simply is the better player. Novak played his best and yet Rafa took his blows and ran away with the match and title.
     
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  11. Bendex

    Bendex Professional

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    You can't be serious. Tony has been on the tour for over a decade. He prepares him for battle against the greatest players in the world week in week out.

    He has watched him play since he was a toddler and can pick up on the slightest problem that no one else, including Rafa, can see. Rafa can be dropping it short in round one, Tony will have him on the practice court for three hours that afternoon, the next day Rafa's back to normal.

    What "adjustments" do you think another coach could make?
     
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  12. The Dark Knight

    The Dark Knight Legend

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    Amazing article !!! I highlighted what I thought were the best parts:

    Did you draw any conclusions from that match?

    No, at that point Rafael was the youngest player on the circuit with a good ranking. People were starting to talk about him as someone to watch in the future. But it was a surprising win, to me, because, to beat Federer, at that point didn’t seem normal, since there was such a difference between them.

    The next year, 2005, with the win at Roland Garros, what kind of a leap came from that? What changed, for example, from the losses at the beginning of the year vs. Gaudio?

    What changed? Age. You’re at a formative point and you’re getting better day-by-day.

    But it was a sudden leap.


    During the reign of Pete Sampras there were a lot of people who said that he was boring.

    Very boring. I liked Pete Sampras, myself, but…I remember one time in Stuttgart with Rafael, when he was a junior. We went to play a tournament there and coincided with the pro tournament, which back then was on a fast court. (Huffs.) It was deadly dull, no one returned a single ball. There was a match Krajicek v. Sampras, and they played S&V the whole time. Serve…out. Return…out. I don’t like that at all. I prefer to see the point finished at the net after the point has been fought for at the baseline. But I’ll say this again: it’s up to those that run the sport [because they choose to use] softer or harder balls, slower or faster courts…same as in football: they changed two conventions, ceding the ball to the goalkeeper and the 3 points. [Translator's note: This is more than I understand about football, so I hope that makes sense.]

    Let’s talk about the first Wimbledon final in 2006, which Rafael lost to Federer.

    We didn’t approach that match well. It was our first final there, and we were not very convinced about our chances. Such that, the pre-match preparation wasn’t good. We believed Federer to be much better than us, and I believe that Rafael paid for that in the first set: lost it 0-6. The second was much better contested, he lost 6-7. But at the end of the day the other player was better than Rafael.

    Were there lessons to be learned from that match?

    The lesson, mine especially, was that we hadn’t approached that match well enough. The message before going out is not to be merely contented that you’ve reached the final, but to actually prepare for it well. Whenever you’re in a final match, there’s always a chance you’ll win it. Sometimes you have very little chance, but anything can happen. You always have to go into a final with the desire and belief to win it.

    So I’m guessing that the message changed before the final in 2007, when he again lost to Federer, but in a much closer match.

    Yes, of course, totally. We went out convinced that if playing well enough, he could win. That Federer was still better than us on a grass court…but that the attitude going out onto the court was 100%.

    Then, also in 2008, the Roland Garros final and that convincing defeat of Roger Federer: 6-1, 6-3, 6-0.

    I think that at that moment, Rafael was the best player in the world, he was playing so well, at such a high level. He won in the fourth round very convincingly, won easily in the quarterfinal, and in the semis he played a very good match against Djokovic. I remember the conversation that Rafael and I had before he went out [to play that final.] I told him, “Today I think, at this level, that you could go toe-to-toe with Federer…but let’s go with the usual tactic, that is, attack the backhand.” And the truth is, I think that Federer saw how powerless he was very quickly and didn’t put up much of a fight. He had a bad plan, a very bad one. Therefore, he only won four games. These things happen occasionally.

    Later that same year came the match that surprised the world, the loss to Soderling at Roland Garros. To this day, Rafael’s only loss at that tournament.

    We went in with a lot of problems. That’s not an excuse, because the other guy beat us, and on top of it, quite a while ago. But at that point Rafael had a lot of problems with the knee, along with emotional issues. Beyond that Soderling played very well and Rafael wasn’t good at any point. And it was a shame, because I think that that year Rafael should have finished number one in the world, if he could have confronted that situation. It all came together: his parents’ separation, the knee problems, and therefore he wasn’t strong enough. He was coming off the win at the Australian Open, and I think he’d won in Indian Wells, in Monte Carlo, Rome, Barcelona, and he’d made the final in Madrid. Meaning that, if he’d won Roland Garros, it’s probable that he would have finished the year at number one. Pity.

    That win meant a lot, too.

    Yes, it meant completing the [Career] Slam; I believe he became the youngest player to do it, at least in the Open Era. It was an enormous satisfaction and not because of the [Career] Slam, but because of winning the US Open itself. A great victory.

    If a player gets in your head…

    Yes, of course. When someone beats you, there’s a reason. It’s because you didn’t play well. Or, even more likely, because he’s better than you. And when he’s better, it’s that much harder to beat him.

    Fine, but he might be better and nevertheless…

    OK, one might be Federer and be better than Rafael, but in their individual meetings it can be that Rafael is better. And that’s the reason that it has been hard for Federer to play against him. With Djokovic, there was a time when he was superior and Rafael didn’t have the weapons to beat him. Until the next year, in Australia, when he was at a level to start competing against him again.

    What do you like to do when you’re not working with Rafael?

    I play chess, I like chess. When I’m here, I like to spend time with my children. When I’m traveling, I like to wander around the cities.

    As a coach or in other aspects of life, have you taken any lessons or ideas from chess?

    I think that everything in life has a common denominator and a lot of games do, as well: take control of the center, dominate the game. It’s easiest from the center to direct the ball in any direction, which is the same in chess. Dominate the center. From there, it’s a question of tempo: you have to know to what tempo you’re playing. In tennis, what tempo are we playing to? We play at a much slower speed than Federer, for example. We have to be aware of this aspect of the game. Same as in football. If you play against Barcelona, you have to take away their time, as I understand it, because they can’t put their game together, even if they’re playing well. I think it’s the same for sports, in general.

    Changing the subject: thinking of the book “Sirve Nadal, Responde Sócrates” ["Nadal Serves, Socrates Responds"] that you wrote with Pere Mas, where does this interest in philosophy come from?

    I don’t have any special interest in philosophy. I’m interested in thinking. In analyzing what’s going on around me.
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2013
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  13. The Dark Knight

    The Dark Knight Legend

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    This may actually be the dumbest comment ever made on TW.
     
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  14. aldeayeah

    aldeayeah Hall of Fame

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    LOL

    10 tio tonis
     
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  15. Anti-Fedal

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  16. The Dark Knight

    The Dark Knight Legend

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    Well he was incredible but he was boring to me.....

    First of all he walked around with his shoulders slouched all the time displaying little emotion. He looked depressed.

    Second the fast surface with the big serves and aces were just boring . I was falling asleep.

    I'm not taking anything away from Pete ....but watching a match between two huge servers on a fast court is like watching paint dry.
     
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  17. terribleIVAN

    terribleIVAN Semi-Pro

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    Tony's clueless when it comes to tennis strategy; he's content to ride on Rafa's wave of success brought by his athleticism and determination.

    Anyone could be a great coach in these conditions.

    Once you solve Nadal's top spin balls to ones backhand , like Novak did in 2011, he has no plan B because that's the way he always beat everyone on the circuit.

    And his own backhand is breaking down because he always works to turn it, which is plain idiotic and unworthy of a true number one.

    Rafa needs a new coach, a real one, not a cheerleader.
     
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  18. octobrina10

    octobrina10 Hall of Fame

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    Actually, Rafa has TWO coaches! Fransisco Roig is his second coach since 2005. FR was with Rafa in Montreal & Cincinnati and will probably be in China.

    An interview on August 29, 2013
    ---Q. Can you talk about Francis Roig and how he’s helped you in your career in the last six months or so?
    RAFAEL NADAL: Francis helps me since 2005 that I started with him. Was always a very important help for me. He’s a good combination. Have Toni most of the weeks. But with Francis I am able to work in some aspects, with Toni I work with another ones. So is a good combination. I have to get both of them in my team. I think both of them are fantastic coaches. I feel very, very lucky to have two very good coaches and persons around me.

    Q. What aspects is he best at? What aspects does he help you with more?
    RAFAEL NADAL: ...he knows how to work to make you feel that you are improving, and he knows how to work if you give him two weeks, three weeks of practice with him, most of the times then I feel after this three weeks that I am more fit, that I am playing better than before. ---
     
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  19. wy2sl0

    wy2sl0 Hall of Fame

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    Toni quite obviously says that Federer was the best of his time, including Rafa. You can see it when he bypasses the H2H by saying against each other Rafa comes out on top, but against everyone Federer is still the magician.

    Funny how he said Djoko was simply on another level in '11 and Nadal just wasn't good enough. Gotta love honesty.
     
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  20. The Dark Knight

    The Dark Knight Legend

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    As to the first point the Nadal camp is painfully humble . It's always been that way . Fed calls him one dimensional and Nadal answers with "Fed is the goat".

    As to the second point you are not paraphrasing him correctly. He said that Joker was the better player and Nadal didn't have the weapons to defeat him at the time. So they devised a strategy to deal with Joker.

    Toni is a chess player....he approaches tennis the same way . He sees a problem analyzes and solves.

    That's what you guys are not really getting . Brains is more important than skill in this sport ......and the Nadal camp seems to out play everyone in this regard.

    Strategy and tactics ......something Federer is to stubborn to learn.
     
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  21. Maximagq

    Maximagq Banned

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    Very insightful article on a lot of Nadal's great matches and experiences. Thanks for sharing.
     
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  22. wy2sl0

    wy2sl0 Hall of Fame

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    Can't disagree with you. Although I truly believe Nadal thinks Federer is at least as good as he is.
     
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  23. The Dark Knight

    The Dark Knight Legend

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    I think Nadal thinks Federer is better than him and has more skill..... And it's probably true......but Nadal is smarter......and that's why he wins.
     
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  24. wy2sl0

    wy2sl0 Hall of Fame

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    Yes I agree, and that is why Federer is going to have a hard time keeping his GOAT argument, since he hasn't really adapted his game at all (in terms of tactics) whereas Nadal has over and over again.

    What is most funny is the up and down belief Toni seems to have for Nadal. At one point he says go toe to toe, and then in 2008 Wimbledon, after Federer took the 4th set tiebreak, they show Toni's face and he is devastated - it looks like he thought Federer was going to win for sure. The reason it is weird is because never once has Nadal gone into a 5th and gone away easily.

    Really weird.
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2013
    #24
  25. TennisCJC

    TennisCJC Legend

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    Funny how Uncle Toni is so biased toward the slow baseline grinding game his nephew plays.

    Personally, Sampras vs Agassi at USOpen was great tennis. Contrasting styles, lots of variety, and lots of excitement. Also, the best major final in last few years was Federer over Murray in 2012 Wimbledon. Federer came to net almost 80 times, lots of variety in spin from the baseline.

    I think Nadal is lucky to have played in this era because Uncle Toni is correct in that the tournament sponsors and ATP are favoring slower grinding tennis at the expense of variety and shot making.
     
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  26. Crisstti

    Crisstti Legend

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    There's nothing with as little variety as serve fests. A Federer-Murray match, I don't care how many times Fed went to the net, is nothing even close to that.

    That is actually true, amazing :)

    Toni just seems like such a pessimist really. Rafa had beaten Fed way more often than not, and in the three matches they'd played at RG, and when Rafa is playing better than ever, the best he has to say to him is that he can "go toe to toe" with Federer?. And in 2011 he was very quick to say Djokovic was just better than them then.

    I think Rafa could use a little more self confidence sometimes.

    Anyway, I also thought Rafa was going to lose that Wimbledon match after the fourth set. In fact, I didn't even watch the fifth.
     
    #26
  27. cjs

    cjs Semi-Pro

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    Uncle Toni describing 99% of TW forum posters perfectly.
     
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  28. The Dark Knight

    The Dark Knight Legend

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    WOW! WOW! WOW!!!

    This is one of the deepest insights I have ever seen here on TW.

    I never actually thought about that !

    Conversely Federers fifth set record is not that great.

    The question is why? I think it's mental rather than physical.

    The cincinatti match proved it to me beyond a shadow of a doubt .

    It was match point.... Nadal serving 40-30. Nadal hist a good serve ....fed returns it and Nadal hits a freakish groundstroke winner that seemed to skim the line.

    Federer just gave up and walked off the court.

    Upon the hawk eye review it turned out That Nadals shot was actually OUT!!!

    Why on earth didn't Fed challenge match point ????

    The answer.....he just gave up . And therein lies the difference between the two players .....and no matter what happens in the future I will never be a Fed fan because I just can't respect that.

    I have nothing against Federer but he is not a fighter when compared to Nadal. It's not even close.
     
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  29. Luminaire

    Luminaire Rookie

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    I knew you'd get orgasmic over this.
     
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  30. The Dark Knight

    The Dark Knight Legend

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    There's just so much insightful things.

    Toni is hated on this board....but he may actually might just be the greatest coach of all time . I have never heard anyone speak about tennis the way he does.

    It figures he is a chess player ....it makes perfect sense....and his approach to coaching is just like a chess game. He is not given nearly enough credit.....I love this quote:

     
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  31. Luminaire

    Luminaire Rookie

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    yeah, sure.........wipe off the screen :twisted:
     
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  32. The Dark Knight

    The Dark Knight Legend

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    I love your tag by the way. :)...seriously.
     
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  33. bullfan

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    There are times that Rafa and tennis remind me of the movie, "in Search of Bobbie Fisher". It has to do with Rafa leaving tennis, and not thinking about, then coming back fierce and ready to face his fiercest competitor.

    Rafa seems to know what he needs to do to win. He has a team that is serious. The manage Nadal no matter the top player. He's not fearful to fight, even after a year of losses to another opponent.
     
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  34. Crisstti

    Crisstti Legend

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    OK, actually read the whole interview now :). Very interesting indeed. A few things:

    Great to read about some specific huge matches of Rafa's career.

    Interesting comments about Gasquet and Coria.

    About Nadal's most painful losses (basically what we've discussed here).

    About why they wanted so much that Rafa would win Wimbledon.

    About that match against Gaudio in Argentina.

    Toni discusses with Ferrer and Rafa about their possible place in tennis history.

    It seems that if you play chess online there's a chance you might be playing against Toni :).

    A good read, so thanks to the OP for posting it.
     
    #34
  35. Death Master

    Death Master Banned

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    I see everybody is starting to write like me.

    it is so much easier to read. you can read the whole post in a second.
     
    #35
  36. paolo2143

    paolo2143 Rookie

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    "Nole was beating Rafa in 2011 simple because Rafa was mentally burned out after his successful year. He looked lethargic on the court. He looked like he wanted to get off the 'ATP carousel' and go fishing to Mallorca instead."

    I could argue that the same applies this year and that reason that Rafa is beating Novak is Novak looks mentally and physically below his best and that he has never recovered from his supeb 16 months or so between Jan 2011 and April 2102.I think Djokovic should actually take next few months out to recover ,forgot the No1 Ranking because at moment No matter what ATP computer says Nadal is the number 1 .

    I think a rest would do him the world of good and we should see some amazing battles next year.
     
    #36
  37. aldeayeah

    aldeayeah Hall of Fame

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    Er, the most recent and relatable precendent was Wimbledon 2007. Where they went to 5, then Nadal went MIA halfway in the fifth set, and was crushed by Fed.
     
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  38. Crisstti

    Crisstti Legend

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    Why do so many people talk as if Rafa only began to turn things around against Djokovic this year after the injury layoff?. He beat him three times in a row last year.
     
    #38
  39. wy2sl0

    wy2sl0 Hall of Fame

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    I'm not going to get too high or low. I am still a huge Fed fan because his style is what I like to watch. The thing is as mentioned he is very hard to cheer for against Nadal because he is insane. As said before, the definition is doing the same thing over and looking for a different outcome. We have seen flashes of Federer hit to Rafas BH and it ends up the same as Rafa hitting to Feds. Problem is Nadal will do whatever it takes to win, and Federer has difficulty exploiting weaknesses. His 5 set record is abysmal because of his mental state against Nadal (which is merely because Nadal had a game plan from Day 1, and Roger never expected to be exploited). There is also the fact that Rafa worked harder on fitness arguably. I think at the end of the day we see that hard work trumps talent ( even though Nadal is talented). That's why even though I don't really like watching him I have immense respect for him.
     
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  40. The Dark Knight

    The Dark Knight Legend

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    I've always written that way and I have been accused of being another poster because of my style .
     
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  41. The Dark Knight

    The Dark Knight Legend

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    I think Toni said it best :

     
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  42. Bendex

    Bendex Professional

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    Have you ever played high level tennis, or even watched it up close at court level? It's the fastest most intense sport you can imagine. Your strategy must be simple, your head must be relatively clear. Most important is that you know your strength and set it up as often as possible. All of Nadal's non-strengths setup his strength beautifully. The strategy has lead to enormous success, year after year.

    At this point, maybe he needs a strong cheer leader more than a strategist. We probably can't comprehend how grueling his training sessions need to be. It is heart, not logic that makes that kind of effort possible.
     
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  43. TheTruth

    TheTruth G.O.A.T.

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    Everything you've said is so plain to see.
     
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  44. TheTruth

    TheTruth G.O.A.T.

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    Media and commentator bias aided by those who believed it, and allowed their eyes to deceive them, imo. Pete's game was nowhere near boring and neither was his personality. He was stoic on court like Borg, Roger, and numerous other players.
     
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  45. topher

    topher Semi-Pro

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    That's not true. His first Master's final Miami 2005 against Roger Federer I believe he lost going away in the 5th set 6-1 after being up 2 sets to love. Afterwards I believe there was a short period where his 5th set stamina was questioned (slightly held up by him looking tired in the 5-set epic against Coria in Rome). Once he got his fitness up he always looked solid though. This was his first 5th set ever though perhaps, so maybe Toni just can't get it out of his head? :)
     
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