Interesting Read - Straw Dogs

Discussion in 'Junior League & Tournament Talk' started by tennis5, Jan 6, 2012.

  1. NLBwell

    NLBwell Legend

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    Agassi could have gone from #1 in tennis to #300 in baseball and still have made a boatload of money.
    If you take the best baseball player and he is only the #300 best player in tennis, he would be bankrupt on the futures tour.
     
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  2. Dadof10s

    Dadof10s Banned

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    I think Mr. Agassi was making a generic point that over the last 20 years the number of competitors in tennis from around the world has increased so much. Back when Andre and his buddies were in Bradenton they were the top dogs and there were not tennis academies in most countries like there are today. USA players just have many more players to compete with who are working towards the pros than when Andre was a teenager. I do not think he was saying Andre would have been a great baseball player or not he was just saying that these days his slim chances in baseball would still be better than trying to make a top tennis player. I agree with his point that trying to make a kid into a top tennis player was very hard back when he did it but even way, way harder now.
     
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  3. BSPE84

    BSPE84 Semi-Pro

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    My take of the Agassi quote was the same as yours. With the benefit of hindsight, the quote makes sense in light of the current competitive environment and consideration of risk/rewards; where it falls apart is the presumption that the required skillset is the same. Examples of failures that come to mind are MJ in MLB and Lendl as a golfer.
     
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  4. Dadof10s

    Dadof10s Banned

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    Those examples are not that good because they did not play as much in those other sports. Once Jordan got to 10th grade he played lots of basketball and while he was at UNC played only basketball and in his Bulls years focused on basketball. He then tried baseball a sport that requires years of minor league year round training. Mike had Andre facing the dragon ball machine from age 5 and hitting 1 million tennis balls a year. Had that been a home made batting machine with the same insanity Mike applied to tennis and had he been shooting balls at Andre making him field them there is a very good chance Andre could have succeeded as a short stop or 2nd baseman or in some baseball capacity. A boy fielding and hitting a million baseballs a year and playing year round baseball and going to IMG baseball camp would have a decent chance. Mike Agassi went to extremes in training and probably could have produced a good enough contact hitter to get scouts interested.
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2012
    #54
  5. Orange

    Orange Rookie

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    Of course tennis players are more likely than football players to withdraw from high school in order to be home-schooled. Football players compete at school. Withdraw, and there is no place to compete. That has nothing to do with travel time or training time.

    Baseball and basketball are similar to football regarding the home-schooling issue, although summer baseball and AAU are options for competition. Still, school results are crucial for college recruitment.

    Contrast this with school tennis, where many top players don't play on school teams because doing so could interferes with training and tournament play, where school results don't contribute to national rankings and where school administrations sometimes treat the tennis program like an ugly stepchild.
     
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