Is APD a good choice about elbow?

Discussion in 'Racquets' started by Veens, May 22, 2013.

  1. Veens

    Veens Rookie

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    As I said, I previously used stiff racquets. But I get this elbow/muscle ache or slight pain. Is this a problem thay I should switch to flex racquets or is it alright and should I keep on with stiff racq?
     
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  2. eman resu

    eman resu Semi-Pro

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    You should probably switch. But make sure your strokes are correct and your string is soft, otherwise if won't help much changing racquets.
     
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  3. Veens

    Veens Rookie

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    I use a luxilon alu power rough @57 tension. My strokes are fine. But when I really use power or do a killer my elbow starts having a slight pain. Why is this?
     
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  4. jonahnaturals

    jonahnaturals Rookie

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    I think for that frame, you need to lower your string tension with the ALU power rough to 50 or below, or change to a multi. If these are not options for you, then you're probably best to move to a more flexible frame like the Head Youtek IG Radical Pro. Something in the same weight class that is a lot easier on the arm while providing the same stiff, powerful feel as the APD is the Volkl Organix 8.

    Good luck.
     
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  5. Veens

    Veens Rookie

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    My racquet tension level is 55-65. I'll try thr multi. Well I didn't have this slight pain until I learnt my killer and mastered it. Is it just me or some people also has/had this problem? Or is it possible for me to like get used to this? Because as I look at Nadal, Li Na, Clijsters, they all have stiff racqs. But they don't seem to have such pain. Why is that?
     
    Last edited: May 22, 2013
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  6. jonahnaturals

    jonahnaturals Rookie

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    Clijsters uses a full bed of gut. Na Li uses half excel, which softens the bed up significantly. Nadal is a beast and may be benefiting from some special elixirs that help his elbow and other body parts recover more quickly than is possible for most.
     
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  7. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    THEY don't have arm pain because they are YOUNG, they are TRAINED, they hit much harder, and they mostly use tensions around 50 lbs.
    OTOH, Clister's did have shoulder problems, and most players who used 70 or stiffer rackets currently have arm problems after the end of their careers.
     
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  8. jonahnaturals

    jonahnaturals Rookie

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    My understanding is that Clijsters strings somewhere around 60 with a full bed of gut. Na Li is also around 60 pounds, but with a hybrid of excel and babolat pro hurricane tour. Nadal is around 55 with a full bed of poly.
     
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  9. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Are you forgetting the point that the pro players are gifted, young, hit center, are trained, are stronger for tennis than any of us, and you are just focusing on strings as the culprit?
    Nadal strings lower than 55 for sure.
     
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  10. Lukhas

    Lukhas Legend

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    They are pros, so they are trained physically to sustain such effort. If you take most of pros's racquets and tried to play with it, it would be an unusable baseball club for you: stuff in the 340-360 grams with a SW over 350. And Nadal doesn't play with high tensions anymore either with his RPM Blast. With co-poly you can drop few pounds safely. EDIT: And it seems gut plays nothing like co-polys.

    Maybe you should try an hybrid setting to soften a bit the string bed. Like Prince Beast Attack for example, but more people here are wiser than I am when it comes to hybrid setups. Don't wait for the injury to get the change done.
     
    Last edited: May 22, 2013
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  11. BreakPoint

    BreakPoint Bionic Poster

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    Why? Because you're using a very stiff racquet with very stiff strings, that's why. Switch to a very flexible racquet with very soft multifilament strings and your elbow pain should go away.
     
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  12. BreakPoint

    BreakPoint Bionic Poster

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    Clijsters also had very bad wrist problems which sidelined her for quite a while.

    Also, pros change to fresh strings every 9 games in a match. No recreational players can afford to do that.
     
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  13. BreakPoint

    BreakPoint Bionic Poster

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    Why? Because the pros are supreme conditioned athletes who do a lot of off-court training to prevent injuries. Tennis is their full time job so they train every day for 8 hours a day.

    It would like asking why I can't play as hard as an NBA basketball player without hurting myself? LOL
     
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  14. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Bottom line....
    Use 10 lbs less string tension.
    Switch to multi and lower tension 7 lbs.
    Or switch to a 60 flex racket from your current 70.
     
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  15. MikeHitsHard93

    MikeHitsHard93 Hall of Fame

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    Did you know that clijsters switched to full gut actually?
     
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  16. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Clister's said she quit tennis to concentrate on family.
    But she had ongoing arm and shoulder problems, contributing to her decision to quit tennis.
    We should be concentrating on OP's problems, not Clister's.
    He is NOT trained, doesn't practice regularly (like the pros), is not a superior athlete, and has normal body parts.
     
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  17. MikeHitsHard93

    MikeHitsHard93 Hall of Fame

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    Um yeah, I was just bringing it up because it is interesting...sorry? :confused:

    To the OP, switch out your strings and you will be amazed by how much more comfortable they can make your racket seem!
     
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  18. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    People say I derail threads all the time....:):)
    Don't be sorry, you said what was on your mind, ALWAYS a good thing.
     
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  19. Say Chi Sin Lo

    Say Chi Sin Lo Legend

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    ... this thread is a joke, right?
     
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  20. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    EVERY thread is somewhat a joke, aren't they?
    Human foibles and follies.
     
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  21. maxrenn

    maxrenn Hall of Fame

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    This was my thinking too
     
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  22. NE1for10is?

    NE1for10is? Semi-Pro

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    The pros also change racquets with fresh strings every couple of changeovers, which saves a lot on the arm with poly.
     
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  23. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Yes, the APD is a good choice about elbow.
    If you want tennis elbow, that is.
     
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  24. acura9927

    acura9927 Semi-Pro

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    Read Fed spends 40k per year on Stringing. Which is more than most the average take home pay of pretty much all my co workers.
     
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  25. Lukhas

    Lukhas Legend

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    ^And that's only for P1 in big tournaments. It's probably even higher IMO.
     
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  26. Say Chi Sin Lo

    Say Chi Sin Lo Legend

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    I also heard Federer has his own cattle ranch, so he gets his gut fresh from the source.

    Some say his cows eat better than most humans do.
     
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  27. Fintft

    Fintft Hall of Fame

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    Well if you don't break strings often then full gut natural gut is the way to go. With tennis elbow I would go 52/50, without it I'd string at 57/55 or so.

    Personally I love a bit heavier racket and basalt for shock absorption (6.1 95 BLX)
     
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  28. MikeHitsHard93

    MikeHitsHard93 Hall of Fame

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    Ten lols.....
     
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  29. Veens

    Veens Rookie

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    Alright, thanks guys. I'll try stringing it with multis or natural gut, or buy a new flexy racquet, thanks for the advices :)!
     
    #29
  30. prjacobs

    prjacobs Professional

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    The APD is a well known elbow killer. Get rid of it. Also, the pro game is way more than tons of training. It's having the hand/eye coordination to basically never miss the sweet spot. I have a few friends who were at one time ranked in the top 200, and they said that the difference between them and the pros is that the pros never miss the sweet spot when in a neutral position. One slightly off shot and the point's over.
     
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  31. hersito

    hersito Rookie

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    It's an easy racquet on the arm and with alu RP to make it easier just rise a few lbs, take it to 80, then ad a brick as a dampner and you have the flexiest stick in the world, your arm will love it and thank you.
     
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  32. anubis

    anubis Hall of Fame

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    I don't recommend the APD if you've had arm pain. Anything with a stiffness of 66 or higher has the potential to hurt your arm if you are susceptible. But sometimes you just have to try it out for yourself and see what happens. You can't always take other people's word for it.
     
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  33. acura9927

    acura9927 Semi-Pro

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    If my Bio 200 never give me an ounce of pain but the APD GT sucked from the 1st hr does that mean my technique is off or do I need hrs of lessons to make the APD GT the right one for my arm?
     
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  34. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    If you NEVER had arm pain before, it's fine to use the APD or PD's, 500's, or some of the new stiffer rackets.
    However, once injured, your problem parts are more prone to reinjury, since it will never ever be "100%" again.
    Use your common sense. If falling off a motorcycle hurts you, and you don't like being hurt, should you just try to ride more carefully? Should you take race courses and instruction to become a better rider, or should you abstain from riding motocycles?
    For me, the pain and injury never bothered me, so I kept riding.
    I do have 3 Dunlop Aero500's around 68 stiffness, which work great for occasional tennis.
     
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  35. RogueFLIP

    RogueFLIP Semi-Pro

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    When I first got my APD, I didn't automatically develop TE/GE. Two separate occassions developed a quick bout of TE and GE and I resolved both by correcting technique flaws and by treating my ARM and correcting issues with my body.

    Each bout of TE and GE lasted about two weeks, and I haven't had any problems since.

    Certainly a lot shorter period of time than trying to find another racket and string setup that doesn't hurt the arm.

    While I will not dispute the APD's stiffness may lead to problems in people, don't forget to treat the body as well.
     
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  36. tmc5005

    tmc5005 Rookie

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    You should switch racquets the Babolat APD is notorious for arm problems. You need to look at a flexible frame. If you want to stick with Babolat look at the Babolat New Pure Storm-LTD GT (95)
     
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  37. 2Hare

    2Hare Semi-Pro

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    I agree with the earlier comment that 57 is too high for Alu in APD. Alu is a powerful poly, and might be too powerful for APD. You might want to try a softer lower power poly strung at low 50s first. And APD is designed for players hitting with western or extreme western forehands with long strokes. If you hit with more classic forehands or shorter strokes, Pure Storms might be more suitable for you. If somewhere in between, Pure Drive might work too.
     
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  38. USArmyTennis

    USArmyTennis New User

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    If you have to have babolat, then Pure Storm is probably the only option. The rest are known to "drive" arm issues worse then they started. Start looking into other brands, that do more to make softer racquets. Or look at your technique, which I find to be problems for alot of people. I have a flex range where I can't go past 65 and have it work, but that is just me.
     
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