Is it okay to stick the tie-knot end into a cross-hole and tie it to a main?

Discussion in 'Strings' started by dacrymn, Aug 26, 2007.

  1. dacrymn

    dacrymn Professional

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2006
    Messages:
    887
    What i mean is, after i finished the entire stringjob, the VERY END had no large holes i could fit the last part of the string into (two piece), except for one large hole that a cross was going into (yes i'm positive i got the string pattern and skips right). I know you aren't supposed to tie it to a cross so it tied it to a very, very near main. It was so close it was practically right outside the hole.

    Is this bad? I've been thinking about it, and i've come up with zero repercussions to it. So it'll pull the main a little, but so does a normal. It doesn't reach very far out at all. It really not that much more stress against the frame....or is it?

    So stringing experts, can i have some help on this one?

    Thanks.
     
    #1
  2. gjoc

    gjoc Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    May 3, 2007
    Messages:
    502
    Location:
    Arlington, VA
    Do you mean that the end is tied perpendicularly to a string running past the hole that the end comes out of, not to the other string running through the same hole that the end goes through and comes out of?
     
    #2
  3. Gmedlo

    Gmedlo Professional

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2007
    Messages:
    1,183
    Location:
    P-Town, WA
    I believe some racquets with 16x20 patterns that call for a one peice recommend tying off on one of the crosses when hybriding, if you have to.

    Most likely with what you did you lost a ton of tension. The main you tied the knot on could have a higher chance of shearing too.

    Just curious, what racquet were you stringing?
     
    #3
  4. dacrymn

    dacrymn Professional

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2006
    Messages:
    887
    I'm stringing an nBlade Midplus.

    The key, though, is that the main is really close to the hole. So from what i can see, i tied two knots (which is what i normally do anyways), and the knot is big enough that the holding-the-tension part is actually from the knot, pushing against the hole but not going through, not from pulling on the main. It's hard to describe. What i mean is, the main is still straight, not bent because the cross knot is pulling on it to maintain tension. The knot is big enough that it gets in the way BEFORE it needs to pull on the main. Do you get what i'm saying? I realize it'll be hard to understand.

    What's shearing?

    You're actually allowed to tie knots on cross-strings? Why do i remember hearing from somewhere that you shouldn't?

    gjoc: Yes, it's perpendicular.

    Thanks.
     
    #4
  5. dancraig

    dancraig Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    May 24, 2005
    Messages:
    3,239
    So you pushed the string through a cross grommet but tied off on the neigboring main string, which was very close by. You did this because you believed it was always wrong to tie off on a cross. It's not always wrong to tie off on a cross. Sometimes you have to. Next time just tie off on the cross.
     
    #5
  6. dancraig

    dancraig Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    May 24, 2005
    Messages:
    3,239
    Shearing is when a string breaks or "shears off" because of the force of ball impact, near the frame of the racquet.
     
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2007
    #6
  7. Steve Huff

    Steve Huff Legend

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2004
    Messages:
    7,280
    I figured it was a Wilson. To tie off about all Wilsons in a 2-piece stringjob, the tie off for the crosses is to another cross.
     
    #7

Share This Page