Is it possible to go frm 3.5 to 5.5-6.0 in one year?

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by Hrandyrko, Oct 6, 2009.

  1. jserve

    jserve Rookie

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2008
    Messages:
    128
    Location:
    Bellevue, WA
    I would disagree with this. Most 5.5s in high school would go on to play college tennis. A player that is 17 or 18 yrs old and isn't 6.0+ is not gonna make it on the tour.
     
  2. BreakPoint

    BreakPoint Bionic Poster

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2004
    Messages:
    43,255
    A 17 year-old who's a "strong 5.5" or a 6.0+ is most likely not even playing high school tennis because it'll be a waste of time for him. He's most likely focusing only on playing in tournaments to improve his national ranking.
     
  3. gameboy

    gameboy Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2009
    Messages:
    1,620
    6.0+ junior is not playing at his/her high school. Most nationally ranked juniors are playing tournaments and other events. They are not going to touch high school tennis.
     
  4. LES

    LES Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2005
    Messages:
    487
    Location:
    Brooklyn, NY
    wrong thread
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2009
  5. GuyClinch

    GuyClinch Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2004
    Messages:
    4,673
    Yeah but I feel you can maintain a 3.5 level playing only 30 or so times a year.. The flipside is that despite the 10,000 rule thats been bandied about here you can play ALOT and still be a 3.5.

    If you use the same crappy form that you always use your not going to really get much better by playing alot.. I play some people that have a dink second serve. Well I can hit that serve better then most of they can but I stop using it so I could get better. :p

    Pete
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2009
  6. Mick

    Mick Legend

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2006
    Messages:
    8,345
    on the weekends, i sometimes would play with this guy who has a bad form but maybe because he's one of those folks who have spent 10,000 hrs on the tennis court, most of his shots would come in hard and deep. and because of his unorthodox form, it is really difficult to read where his ball is going to land.
     
  7. Steady Eddy

    Steady Eddy Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2007
    Messages:
    2,544
    Location:
    Arizona
    I certainly see this happen. I see players who play alot but never improve. In fact, it's improvement that seems to amaze people, not stagnation. Maybe it's because people just dig deeper grooves in their bad habits, they get to 3.5 and stay there. That's why when public facilities offer drop-in tennis, almost everyone is at the same level.

    If you spend several years at the same level, it's going to be very hard to change.
     
  8. eagle

    eagle Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2004
    Messages:
    1,585
    Location:
    Kona, Hawaii
    Most of us are guilty of change. We want to improve but can't stand to lose if the change we are trying to achieve negatively impacts the current results of our game. We become impatient and revert to our current ways. That's probably why players who start young and are coached properly tend to move up the skill ladder much faster and go beyond 3.5 because they aren't weighed down yet by ego. :)

    r,
    eagle
     
  9. Mick

    Mick Legend

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2006
    Messages:
    8,345
    it depends on the coaches. i know two guys who are tennis coaches but are not very good players. they could serve as tennis coaches for beginners but the problem is they have flaws in their strokes and they are going to teach the beginners their flaws :shock:
     
  10. Ucantplay2much

    Ucantplay2much Rookie

    Joined:
    May 7, 2009
    Messages:
    148
    What sports have played previously and how did you do in them? Does your school have PE? Do you decimate everyone in your class in the 40-yard dash or blow everyone off the court in basketball? Do you have a 30-inch vertical leap and can dunk a basketball? When you play touch football with your buddies, are you a receiver that no one can keep up with or a quarterback that can throw the ball the length of the field and nail your receiver every time?

    If you don't have this kind of speed and hand-eye coordination, it's very doubtful you have the talent to become a 6.0 period, much less do it in one year.
     
  11. Steady Eddy

    Steady Eddy Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2007
    Messages:
    2,544
    Location:
    Arizona
    Brutal reality pays a visit. :(
     
  12. Ucantplay2much

    Ucantplay2much Rookie

    Joined:
    May 7, 2009
    Messages:
    148
    Yeah, reality bites :)
     
  13. MNPlayer

    MNPlayer Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2008
    Messages:
    420
    Location:
    Minneapolis, MN
    I work at a hedge fund and I can tell you - predicting what a stock will do with any confidence is extremely difficult. Almost as tough as becoming a 5.0. :) That said, the risk-reward ratio in finance is probably still much better than in tennis. I make a good living without being one of the top 200 stock pickers in the world.
     
  14. vinouspleasure

    vinouspleasure Rookie

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2004
    Messages:
    325
    one of the guys I play tennis with is a strong 4.0, a 4.5 if he played more. His son started subbing in occasionally on our doubles court when he was 13...probably a weak 3.5 at the time. He played tennis and basketball through high school. After his junior year in high school, he was probably a strong 3.5. He stopped playing basketball that year and dedicated himself to tennis, taking lessons with our club pro every week, playing in tournaments and hitting often through the week. The winter of his senior year he was barely manageable on our court, clearly a strong 4.5. By the end of his senior year he beat our club pro who is a weak 5.0

    that's about the most improvement I've seen in a year. I should add if it's not clear that he was an exceptional athlete and one of the quickest people I've seen on a tennis court.
     
  15. SmAsH999

    SmAsH999 Rookie

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2008
    Messages:
    362
    Location:
    on top of the net, ready to put away an easy volle
    dude, i've noticed that the later you start, the more quickly you progress, but the less you progress overall. i've been playing since i was 7, and i am now in the 16s. i'm a 5.0 on pretty good days, but i still can't achieve a top 10 sectional ranking. it's tough, you know? it's cool to dream, and i'll admit that anything's possible, but it's more about what's probable. i believe you could reach 5.5 in about 3 years with hard work, but a pro i know personally was pretty much a 3.5 when he was 8. dude, i'm not saying not to believe, and by all means push yourself, cause i know how badly you can want it sometimes. best of luck to you.

    -Smash
     
  16. teppeiahn1

    teppeiahn1 Rookie

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2008
    Messages:
    394
    Let me tell you man, your question is rude to tennis players that work real hard to get better. It is practicaly impossible to achieve alot in 1 year. I would be suprised even if you got to a 4.5
    another thing is that your a youngster. only 13 bro? your body hasnt grown yet man. try playing some 4.54 man they would over power u most likely.

    tennis is something you get good at over period of time.

    btw, i feel that going to 5.5-6.0 is like geting to 3.0-5.0 10x
     
  17. NLBwell

    NLBwell Legend

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2004
    Messages:
    7,071
    NO
    Assuming you are a young teenager and 1) you are very dedicated, 2) have no basic flaws in your strokes and have good coaching, 3) grow at a decent rate, you might make 5.5 in 3 to 4 years. this would get you into position to become a pro. After that, you have to have inherent natural talent that few people in the world have (both physically and mentally) and be able to avoid injuries.
    I would say work on your tennis every moment possible for 1 1/2 years. If you are a 4.5 level/competitive junior player then keep doing it for another year. If, by that point, you are one of the top couple juniors in the state, maybe go for the tennis academy or other way of dedicating yourself completely to tennis. Whether you top out at 5.5 or can go further will be a matter of how hard you work and your mental, emotional, and physical talents (no one said Hewitt was better physically than Safin, so don't underplay the non-physical parts).
     

Share This Page