Is switching from Right to LEFT, a smart choice?

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by Mr.kevinle91, Aug 1, 2014.

  1. Mr.kevinle91

    Mr.kevinle91 New User

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    I hear from a few players that were played 4.0 as a righty, but decided to train as a lefty because his right side had too many bad habits and flaws. Would you start all over again on the opposite side, knowing that you know the basics and are able to become style you want since your starting fresh? is it worth it?
     
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  2. TeamOB

    TeamOB Professional

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    On the Kyrgios/Thiem/Zverev bandwagon!
    I you are already a 4.0, you should probably just stick to the hand you always used. Becoming a 4.0 from scratch can take a long time so it is probably not worth the switch. It is far easier and quicker to simply fix up your existing technique than to start from scratch with your non-dominant hand.
     
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  3. Topspin Shot

    Topspin Shot Legend

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    +1 this. Don't do it.
     
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  4. ace_pace

    ace_pace Rookie

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    Depends. If winning/losing isnt important to you, go ahead. But if you are competitive or value winning and maintaining skill level, dont do it, do what the guys above me said.
     
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  5. jrs

    jrs Professional

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    I tried this as an experiment in Table Tennis - I found the hardest thing to adjust was the footwork. My feet automatically setup for right hand shot.

    A friend of mine due to Tennis elbow switched to left in TT - but it took around a year playing - to become a 3.5 player - but still not to the level he was as a right handed player.
     
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  6. MethodTennis

    MethodTennis Hall of Fame

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    I know a guy that had to do this after injuring his right arm. He must really love the game as he was probably a 4.0 and is now still grinding away improving.
     
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  7. cjs

    cjs Semi-Pro

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    A few? Surely this is incredibly rare and would require a degree of ambidexterity to begin with.

    Only right-handed person I know who learned to play with their left hand lost their right arm in a car crash.
     
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  8. movdqa

    movdqa Legend

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    I have a friend, former 5.5, probably 4.5 now that has been working on this for 7 to 8 years. His lefty groundstrokes are quite good. He can hit volleys but nowhere near as good as his rightie strokes and his serve is awful. It has pace and spin but he has a lot of problems getting it in the service box,

    I think that this only works if you commit to it (basically dump the rightie strokes completely). I've tried learning a leftie serve a few decades ago and determined that it wasn't worth the effort - unless I had an injury that severely compromised my ability to play rightie.
     
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  9. Raul_SJ

    Raul_SJ Professional

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    Don't see any reason why any healthy person would waste their time doing this.
     
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  10. oldschoolrules

    oldschoolrules New User

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    Switching is definitely not easy. One of the biggest challenges one might face (was and still is for me, at least) when doing so is, interestingly enough, making the necessary visual adjustments after having "trained" your eyes for so many years to judge/measure the depth and speed of the ball on groundies as well as it's height and position on the toss that are now being hit from the "wrong" side.
     
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  11. Mr.kevinle91

    Mr.kevinle91 New User

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    Thank you guys! :D I definetly wanted to hear your guy's opinion and stories. I know its possible but no one that is healthy and fit would ever give up such stupidty to switch from their dominant hand to their non-dom. This is actually my first post, so im very happy to hear feedback from the top legends :D
     
    #11
  12. thatguymattin

    thatguymattin Semi-Pro

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    I can hit forehands with my left hand, but my arm feels week. It's like developing muscles for tennis all over. Backhand is tricky... and serves are also non-existent.
     
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  13. ProgressoR

    ProgressoR Hall of Fame

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    Yes, that is really stupid, especially if they had hopes to be professional and perhaps reach no. 1 someday. Idiots :)
     
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  14. movdqa

    movdqa Legend

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    I've played left-handed in really weak social mixed doubles before.
     
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  15. oldschoolrules

    oldschoolrules New User

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    I had to switch in my early teens because of an accident, by the way, and after I had already started playing competitively as a right-hander
     
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  16. FitzRoy

    FitzRoy Professional

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    Yeah, I know what you mean about this. I experimented with playing left-handed for a few weeks after injuring my right arm and feeling like it might be something that would prevent me from playing regularly; I could do pretty good swings with decent form and racquet speed just standing there, but reacting to a ball just seemed impossible, it felt so hard to track the ball while trying to set up with feet and such.

    I realized it would take years to relearn all the stuff I had taken for granted, so I just focused on getting my dominant arm healthy.
     
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  17. TeamOB

    TeamOB Professional

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    On the Kyrgios/Thiem/Zverev bandwagon!
    The only reasons I can see for switching are:

    1. You are injured and physically incapable of playing with your dominant hand.

    2. You don't care about competition and just wanna do it for ****s and giggles.

    Other than that there is really no reason. Any "lefty advantage" is far ofset by the difficulty of switching and doing it simply because your righty technique is poor is not a good idea. It's much easier to overhaul your righty strokes then to learn lefty from scratch.
     
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  18. ProgressoR

    ProgressoR Hall of Fame

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    At least your toss should improve greatly, no?
     
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  19. FitzRoy

    FitzRoy Professional

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    Mine didn't when I tried it...granted it was only for about 3 weeks, but trying to toss right and serve left was a freaking nightmare for me. Even though I'm right-handed, tossing it with the right felt so foreign after years of doing it left..
     
    #19
  20. oldschoolrules

    oldschoolrules New User

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    My toss didn't - and is still sketchy after several years - but that was/is probably due to the decrease in strength and function of my right hand from the incident
     
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  21. boramiNYC

    boramiNYC Hall of Fame

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    Working on symmetry of the body is always a challenging but rewarding experience. Working on the non-dominant side will help you refine your dominant side as well. Highly recommended.

    I once tried to drive with the feet switched. Left foot Acc and right foot brake. Crazy in the beginning but the process and improvement was interesting.
     
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