Is Technique important?

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by Camilio Pascual, Jul 14, 2004.

  1. Camilio Pascual

    Camilio Pascual Hall of Fame

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    The discussion of the Williams sisters' technique in Pro Player Talk really surprised me. Technique is important for several reasons:
    1. Injury prevention: biomechanically sound practices such as , don't lead with elbow on 1H BH, don't hold arm straight on FH.
    2. Duplication and consistency that comes from having technique: being able to hit shots that have a high predictability of pace, spin, and depth.
    3. Footwork: Maintenance of balance when hitting, maintenance of court position without making it easy to hit behind you.
    4. Biomechanical efficiency: hitting shots with maximum effect you want (power or spin) for the most minimal effort possible.
    5. Unorthodox techniques to accomodate injuries and unusual capabilities. Such as Mac's serve or Bertasegui's hitting with the same face of the racquet.

    I just did this off the top of my head. Additions, disagreements, corrections? What say ye?
     
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  2. kevhen

    kevhen Hall of Fame

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    Yes technique is very good in injury prevention and developing a repetitive consistent shot but I see too much focus on technique at the club level with dismal results when it comes to putting those techniques into match play when balls aren't spoon fed.
     
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  3. Agent Smith

    Agent Smith New User

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    Technique is good for practicing but often times you have to improvise in matches.
     
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  4. Camilio Pascual

    Camilio Pascual Hall of Fame

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    You guys are right, but I'd say the better you are, the more you will profit from proper techniques. Kevhen, I know what you are saying, I'm learning to play mixed doubles with many players not as good as me. When they blow a shot, they often kid each other and talk about how it is not like when the coach spoon feeds them.
     
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  5. kevhen

    kevhen Hall of Fame

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    Yes, technique is probably my biggest weakness, but over time my strokes have improved on their own and my technique looks better and better, but it's more like evolution to me as I just go about trying to hit good shots and eventually I discover the correct technique and work on getting that ingrained into my muscle memory. I don't usually try to imitate what somebody else tells me to do, just what actually works on the court, unless I can see where it could be useful in the future with enough practice. Too many people try to imitate a pro's technique or what some instructor claims to be the 'right' technique but we are all unique and everyone hits the ball a little bit differently from every one else so there is alot of variance in what is the correct technique in the sport of tennis.
     
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  6. Feña14

    Feña14 Legend

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    I think that technique shouldn't be taught.

    I often see players become obsessed with getting their technique perfect, when all it does it hinder your brain.

    Look at Tim Henman this year, he has just concentrated on being aggresive and don't think about anything, and let it come naturally. His groundies have improved loads and thats through his simple thinking.

    I have never had a lesson in my life and have my own technique that I understand.

    Technique is over-rated imo.

    -Liam
     
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  7. kevhen

    kevhen Hall of Fame

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    Yes agreed, I think experimentation is the key to finding a technique that works for you. Watching what others do and then trying it and seeing if it works for you is the way to go. I agree too many people get stuck trying to hit the way someone tells them they must hit. It does seem to hinder the brain. You go out and do what comes naturally and you usually perform much better when you are relaxed and comfortable and not trying to force something. I have never had a coach and am close to 4.5 now without ever taking lessons, just one winter drill class which was useless except for learning the continental grip for hard spin serves.
     
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  8. kevhen

    kevhen Hall of Fame

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    Also if you technique is causing injury then you know you must do something different. But you should change your style before you do to much damage.
     
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  9. PhatAbbott

    PhatAbbott Rookie

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    Almost all pros in the top 20 have key points in there stroke collection. Certain little aspects that a biomechanics coach can identify. Without these keys the players strokes would break down become erratic. Then they would be low level players suddenly.

    Coaching does not have to be too analytical in that respect. Its use should be to try and let players develop there own natural styles and game.

    The problem is that most people don't pick these key points up by them selves and usually need coaching to learn them. Coaching is just an aid to learning.

    So of course you don't need coaching ... but its there if you want it.
     
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  10. kevhen

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    Technique is important but I see too many instructors focusing solely on hitting technique and forgetting about footwork and court strategy and hitting with various spins and the other things that make up the game of tennis. And too many people pay too much money to learn someone else's ideal technique in my opinion.
     
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  11. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    I think your example of Henman is not an example of the "non-teaching" of technique. Henman has good technique. He just stopped thinking so much about what he needed to do against a player and just started doing what he did best. He didnt over think his strategy and tactics which is different then technique.

    Technique falls in several departments:

    1. Footwork and balance

    2. Body position and movement

    3. Racquet preparation

    4. Swing

    5. Recovery

    Based on these areas of technique, I would say learning proper technique is pretty damn important. Especially since technique will cover learning how to:

    1. Serve

    2. Volley

    3. Hit Overheads

    4. Hit drop shots

    5. Hit approach shots

    6. Hit groundstrokes

    7. Hit half volleys

    Each of these areas are very different. Technique is about "how" to do something. Once good technique is learned a player should be free to develop their style.
     
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  12. jun

    jun Semi-Pro

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    Technqiue is definately important. Proper technique lets players hit effectively and efficiently. And poor technique can hinder the stroke's progress.

    But as long as people stay within the framework, there can be a lot of variations.
     
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  13. Rickson

    Rickson G.O.A.T.

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    Technique is extremely important. I know a guy who refuses to learn a forehand with followthrough, insisting that he will develop his own style of play. Needless to say, this guy has never beaten me, he hasn't even come close, and yes, I've bageled him many times.
     
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  14. Nosoupforyou

    Nosoupforyou Rookie

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    Technique is very important to me especially on my groundstrokes, i fear however i have taken it to the point where i ignore other parts of my game because i am so focused on the technique of my forehand, backhand, and serve. I think technique is great to a certain point but I think that you can have near perfect technique and still be killed because there are certain intangibles in tennis.
     
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  15. Feña14

    Feña14 Legend

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    Ok the objective of tennis is to hit a ball over the net and in the court and make it bounce twice on there side.

    I have learnt technique by just watching pro's on TV. That has helped me. Just keep it simple and that works for anyone.

    I had loads of golf lessons after getting a handicap of 8 by myself, and they just made my brain go into over drive and I lost the simplicity of the game.

    Technique: you ever have it or you don't, it can't be taught properly imo.
     
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  16. kevhen

    kevhen Hall of Fame

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    All I know is that I have seen plenty of club players taking lessons on learning the proper technique, blah, blah, blah and spending twice as much time on the court as what I have and very few have moved up from 3.5 to 4.0 in the time it took me to. I wasn't concerned with technique, just in how to get the next ball back and eventually my technique improved and I was able to win matches as I progressed instead of playing like how someone else wanted me to play. Many people told me I could never win with a slice forehand but they were wrong. It does have it's limitations at the 4.5 level, but not many people get to that level anyway. So unless someone has a blatant hitch in their swing, I say leave them alone and let them hit the ball the way that it feels natural to them. Doesn't mean that you can't encourage them to try new grips or swingpaths, but way too much time is focused on cookie-cutter technique. Everyone ends up with the same topspin forehand and topspin backhand and it's pretty easy to defend against.
     
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  17. Feña14

    Feña14 Legend

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    Exactly Kevhen, I couldn't agree with you more.

    Tennis is an easy game, only the player makes it complicated!
     
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  18. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    Actually, Liam I have had the opposite experience. I had "poor" technique of the backhand when I was young and learning tennis until a coach came a long and helped me correctg certain flaws in my swing.

    Also, usually people that have never taught tennis for a living usually say that players dont need to "learn" anything formally, that tennis is simple, and nobody needs lessons, so just go out and hit a ball and it will "happen".

    The problem with that thinking is that everyone is different. I have had countless students thank me as a coach in helping them with certain flaws in their strokes because they were self taught. I think just because you can't learn a certain way does not mean that everyone cant learn that way.

    Tennis is a complex sport. It is pretty simple minded of you to say it is an easy sport to learn and dismiss all the research that says otherwise. I would venture to say you dont know a whole lot about player development outside of your own playing ability and learning characteristics.

    I think it is great for you to learn on your own by watching a video and then doing it. That is fantastic. But to say everyone can learn that way is forgetting that the world does not revolve around you!
     
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  19. Feña14

    Feña14 Legend

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    I really respect teaching pro's as they not only have the knowledge, but also the way that they explain there knowledge.

    In England the pro's that I have seen just want your money, they don't teach properly and rarely turn up until about half of your lesson time is over.

    Sure people should have a couple of lessons to get them of on the right track, so they know the basics. Then they should try for themselves and if they don't get any further then they should fix what is wrong with them.

    But to me, it's all mental.
     
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  20. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    Now wait a second. Kevhen I actually thought you knew something about tennis. Now, I am thinking you only know what you have experienced and have no clue what others see tennis as.

    A good coach would never get someone to play like they play. A good coach will make sure the player is doing the right things and to develop the players choice of style in their game.

    The reason why people work on their swing more than anything is that people have the misconception that what is wrong with their game only has to do with the swing. They forget that footwork, conditioning, and other areas are more important to develop in order to support a good swing.

    Bottom-line: I think your post is full of crap. You have no clue what your talking about nor know how player development actually works. You only know your little slice forehand game and your little world of 4.0 game.

    The trouble with spouting your mouth off like you did, is that you
    have no basis of saying anything. You have no track record in player development - nothing! Yet, you know so much! Maybe we ought to invite you to the next USPTA player development conference to speak on your own little views.
     
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  21. kevhen

    kevhen Hall of Fame

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    Excellent! A little tension on this board! A coach good is worth everything but there are plenty of bad coaches out there teaching their own style of play since that is all they know. Too many in my opinion and charging too much for not improving their pupils.

    I give free advice to all the people who join my hitting groups and I watch them improve.

    I wouldn't call my forehand slice game little, but I do have a big topspin forehand but it's not to the consistency level that I like so I save it for doubles and putaway balls. I am not 5.0 but I know what it takes to get there and I can spot good technique, good footwork, a player's stronger side, etc.

    You may believe in technique and of course at the highest levels you better have very good technique, but at the lowest levels it is only a guideline to help people realize what they may be doing wrong but I know I never tell anyone to change there technique, but will maybe point out they need to take a longer backswing, or stand farther from the ball, or clear the net by higher or lower amounts or to try to put less or more spin on the ball, but I believe a player should develop in how they see themselves developing.

    I am not a paid pro but just an amatuer helping my 2.0-3.5 friends. Just my opinion. Don't get upset.
     
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  22. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    Not getting upset. I just think your "blurting" is a bunch of BS. You would probably be surprised at just how much "information" you are giving to your 2.0-3.5 friends falls into the world of "technique".

    I just think you dont have a clue what your talking about.
     
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  23. kevhen

    kevhen Hall of Fame

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    Yes I do help them with technique but it's not the main focus. It's more about having fun and playing competitive matches that helps fuel everyone's drive to improve.

    I just see too many players trying to hit like someone else has taught them and not showing any improvement at all. These types have trouble adjusting to all the variables in a real match.
     
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  24. Feña14

    Feña14 Legend

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    To sum up my opinion,

    I think that technique does have an impact on your game, but many people think that it is "the be all and end all" and there mental weakness takes over.

    I know as it has happened to me in golf. I really respect Bungalo Bill for the way he has the greatest knowledge of any coach I have ever heard speak about the game they love, and the way he takes time to post to us about it and he speaks in a way that eveyone can understand.

    I rarely listen as I know that it will Brain-Wash me, and thats because I won't be mentally strong enough to understand it. Thats my problem.

    Keep up the good work Bungalo Bill!!! :D

    -Liam
     
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  25. kevhen

    kevhen Hall of Fame

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    Mental weakness is also descriptive of many of these club paying players who don't think for themselves having the instructor do all the thinking and will give up when playing outdoors whenever the wind picks up. I will take a mentally strong pusher over the average club player anyday.

    Bill, I do think the bulk of what you say is very good and appreciate many of your wise comments. Even the part about me blurting a bunch of BS!
     
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  26. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    Ok,

    Kevhen and Liam. Lets agree that technique has its place. lets agree that once a player understands what he is suppose to do (via, watching a match, getting a lesson, reading a book, etc.) and can transfer this new found knowledge that the emphasis on technique doesnt necessairly lessen but broadens its scope into other areas.

    For instance, if we were teaching someone standing still to swing a forehand correctly and they do it, we just need to start feeding balls, or getting them to play with a ball machine (this is because the ball is fed to a certain spot to engrain muscle memory) to develop the stoke. However, once the player is on the run and the stroke breaks down, we can then mix technique with movement development.

    So we can agree that tennis is not just about technique, but about other areas that are critical in supporting technique. We can agree that there are coaches only concerned with their pocket books, and coaches that only specalize in technique and don't tell their students when it is time to move on. I can get there. I am on board with that.

    I just think that like coaches taking things too far and only concentrating on technique and not anything else, a player can over compensate and say technique is a waste of time. I dont think any of us really believe that.

    I think all of us believe that technical training has its place and should be used and emphasized accordingly.

    Can you guys get there?
     
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  27. kevhen

    kevhen Hall of Fame

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    Agreed.
     
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  28. kevhen

    kevhen Hall of Fame

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    Even though I have never used a ball machine, I can see where it has it's place in developing consistency once a good technique has been established.

    With my public group though we don't pay any money to learn but just learn more evolutionary by seeing what works against each other. It's the poor man's way to improving. One guy flattened out his forehand from last year and he went from 3.0 to 3.5. Another guy went to hitting a flat serve instead of a side spinning serve and is a stronger 3.5 now. I may have suggested some of these things to these guys but mostly they just watched and learned and experimented and found doing some of those things worked within their game. You have to work within the body type and mindset of each player to develop them to their fullest.
     
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  29. Feña14

    Feña14 Legend

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    I don't suppose I have any choice Bill!!!

    You are the person that I most respect on the boards and you know your stuff so I will have to say that technique does have a place, just behind mental toughness :wink:

    So i'm glad we sorted this out, and we are all friends, yes??

    I don't want to argue with Bill as I know I can't win when it comes to this type of matter :D . Phil and david aames always start on me and I will talk back as I know I can beat them and find it quite funny. But with you Bill I will back down :)

    Bungalo Bill is the bomb!!!!

    -Liam
     
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  30. kevhen

    kevhen Hall of Fame

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    I also believe the poor man's way may work for the pros too as many of the top pros will have hitting partners who are pros too. Have Serena and Venus ever hit together? I think Blake and Ginepri and Fish will hit together. The Bryans have hit together. The big time tennis clubs have their pupils face off too. But there are some coaches who will work with their student until they are good and ready to go pro and not rush them into battle too soon so they don't ruin their confidence. So there maybe are different ways to improve. Working on technique alone until you are solid or seeing what actually works the best in match-like conditions until your game is honed.
     
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  31. Camilio Pascual

    Camilio Pascual Hall of Fame

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    BB, I have enough respect and regard for you to say that, as a pro tennis coach, you shouldn't belittle Kevhen's "little" 4.0 slice forehand game. I would hope you or no one else here would belittle any of us for our tennis ranking.

    As far as the issue at hand is concerned, I am in agreement with you in this thread. I assume you are taking issue with Kevhen's observation of club players apparently wasting their time and money with coaches. I've observed the same thing, but feel it is almost always the player's fault he does not improve. Ultimately, a tennis player is his own coach, whether he has a coach or not.

    Coaches tell me they often feel they are paid babysitters for many juniors and a lot of adults with money take the lessons for the status of "I have a tennis coach." They know a lot of these players don't really practice or try hard. The coaches I know like to see people try hard and improve, it is not just a way to make a buck.
     
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  32. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    I agree with the poor mans way to learn tennis. It is the sole reason why I dedicated myself to these boards. My goal has been to offer the very best tennis advice I can offer to help "the poor mans" way of learning tennis. I too had a hard time growing up playing tennis. My tennis friends came from wealthy parents and learned through private coaches while I was hitting against my friend Back Board and taking sparatic lessons here and there. The price to learn tennis is such a barrier to play this game. That I envy players like you and Liam for learning this game and believing in yourselves to master it. That is awesome.

    When the internet came around and better yet, this discussion board, I said nows my chance. Now is my chance to help all those players that cant afford a coach to learn how to play this game quickly and effectively.

    With the ability to place videos online and compare ourselves to pro players videos - this is just a good thing for us that either dont have the time for lessons or simply cant afford it.
     
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  33. kevhen

    kevhen Hall of Fame

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    Amen. The internet is very nice in that we can all learn from sharing our experiences.
     
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  34. Feña14

    Feña14 Legend

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    Thanks for that Bill,

    It sounds like I am like you, I am 16 and don't have any support from my parents and I just use a wall to hit up for practise and suppose to coach myself. I have watched thousands of Ferrero and T. Johansson matches as they are who I would like to base my game on.

    I don't have enough money myself to pay for constant lessons by myself and even if I did I know that coaches would see it as "babysitting" and wouldn't pay any attention or get there on time. I am lucky that people on my county team are able to take me to tournaments. I am extremely lucky to of had the chance to go to equelite in Valencia, my Spanish was good enough to understand and I got to play alot and did some tough drills which really helped me.

    -Liam
     
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  35. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    I can always count on you Camilio to balance the scales to fairness. I think we all ended up in agreement over certain issues and remain respectful to each other. At least I can speak for myself. Just read on.

    You are also right about "paid babysitters". The stuff people pay for on an overall basis is rarely practiced. Most club players try a "fix" their games from a perspective that it is either they need a new racquet or they need to "fix" something wrong with their swing.

    Rarely, does a player simply say "I'm not hitting the ball right because I am overweight and need to do something about it". Or rarely does a player learn what they need to do and then set out to practice what they learned in a lesson. Most coaches are paid babysitters especially on the Junior level.

    We had one talented junior (actually several) show up for practice. She never looked at us in the eye when we were talking to her. She sort of reluctantly trotted to hit her shots. She would just sort of shrug her shoulders when she missed. It was pathetic. Parents were paying us $75.00 an hour for this lesson. Believe me, we tried everything to get her motivated to learn and practice what we were teaching. It was an expensive babysitting job.

    We did not replace her until we had a replacement in her time slot. We always give the student a chance to grow and the parents to learn they should spend their money on something else. But there is a certain amount of politics in lessons as well. Once we found a replacement - she was out.
     
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  36. TwistServe

    TwistServe Guest

    Do you think if you had taken weekly and biweekly tennis lessons when you were a kid, that you would be an ATP Pro player in the 80s/90s? So what I'm saying is, would it had made any difference to the end result if you had more professional help, or would you have peaked at where you peaked learning by taking lessons here and there?
     
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  37. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    I think so. However, I dont think I would have gotten very high in ranking on pro tour. I dont think I have the genes some of these guys had or have. But going pro and playing lower level tournaments - definetly.

    I had a lot of tools to work with. I am lefthaded, big serve, big forehand, quick for a guy 6' 2" and have a good first step, and I can play doubles or singles with enjoyment. Heck, to this day my friends still want me to play in Open level tournaments against guys half my age.

    I just dont have the time anymore. Spending all weekend or weekends playing in tournaments just doesn't cut it anymore married with three small children. I would need to get in good shape, hit the courts at 5am and do court drills, etc. I am just not there anymore. I had my time in the sun and my family is much more important right now.

    However, I think I make a better coach then I do a player. The things in my mind that I see and wanted to execute and couldnt for one reason or another as a player, I can instill in someone who can execute my thinking. I enjoy that much more.
     
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  38. Feña14

    Feña14 Legend

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    It's obvious that I won't be a pro but you always wonder "what if" like if my parents wanted me to play and got me lessons with some one who actually cared for what I wanted then maybe, I started when I was 4 so who knows what could of happened.

    I think though, that at 16 I am a bit too old to now. Usually by the age of 15-16 you generally know if you are going to make it. But I won't be a teaching pro either as I have no sense of how anything works or how I can explain it.
     
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  39. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    A lot of the greatest tennis players were late bloomers involved in multiple sports before taking tennis seriously. I think anyone with good athletic skills working with a private coach could be at a point to go pro. Going pro does not mean just playing at the grand slams. There are a lot of "pro" players playing lower level tournaments for prize money that you will never know about.
     
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  40. Feña14

    Feña14 Legend

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    Thats fine by me,

    I would love to be out there doing what I love, I would play on anything even in kurtyfedrshdgeghurtemauristan just to compete. I have the skills but not a private coach which will probably be a problem, but I got this far and I don't want to change anything.

    Let's see how things go,

    -Liam
     
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  41. Mahboob Khan

    Mahboob Khan Hall of Fame

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    My lengthy answer could not be posted because of power outage!!! Here is a short one:

    You cannot implement a tactical/strategical plan if you do not have an efficient biomechanically sound technique to go with it!
     
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  42. C_Urala

    C_Urala Semi-Pro

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    Liam, I know you have an issue with typing in red.
    Please, change the color onto something darker. It's really painful to read your posts.

    Sorry for the offtopics
     
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  43. C_Urala

    C_Urala Semi-Pro

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    I'm glad that the subject is settled. I guess I'm only to repeat your posts but that's how I see it.
    When you are w/o a coach, you have nobody to rely on except yourself. It makes you think about what you should do to improve.
    Then you decide that you need a coach, and the lessons begin. You've already delegated the making decision to you coach. And it's very easy to become lazy and to rely on the coach completely. You turn into a puppet in the coach's hands. 'this leg here, that hand there' this swing, this turn, this jump,this....' There are too many of such 'this' and sometimes you lose the woods behind trees.
    And it's really hard to take the reins in to your hands again. But it's not a coach's fault, it's you who gave him the power over you.
     
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  44. C_Urala

    C_Urala Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2004
    Messages:
    480
    And something else.
    Anyone has his own top limit level. For someone it's to be No1 in the world, for someone it's to be the 3.0 level. And you can do nothing to exceed this level. The problem is that you don't know where you highest level is.
    On the other hand, the improvement is not a monotone function of time. It's rather a step function. So when you do not improve for a while, you don't know if it's your limit or you should just wait to step on another level. It's so frustrating!

    I said it and I feel much better.

    (Now, this board is not only a coach and a club, but also a psychoanalyst. :wink: )

    Your thoughts?
     
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  45. bcaz

    bcaz Professional

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    986
    I just want to thank Bungalo, Mahboob, Kevhen, Cypo, Camilio, Vin, and many others for sharing their comments on this board. I don't want to leave anyone out. I'd like to offer more here, but I always seem to learn more than I think I can contribute. I'm 50 and started playing 6 years ago. I salute those of you who support the poor man's way to a better game. I started on city courts woth no knowledge or training and recently had some lessons with a top teaching pro. It's a great game, I love it (wish I started 40 years ago!) and you folks are super to share your love of the game.
     
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  46. lanky

    lanky Rookie

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2004
    Messages:
    103
    WOW What a good post I can only speak from my own experience but I regret I did not have coaching early on as a junior .I recieved coaching when I achieved higher level team status by which time my strokes had flaws which still exist to this day .The problem as i see it is that a good level can be reached with hitches in strokes but there is a ceiling where good players notice the flaw and take you apart.My view : technique is very important to achieve higher levels .But lets not get carried away surely for most of us with a myriad of other committments practice time, fitness, footwork are equally large flaws
     
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  47. nyu

    nyu Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2004
    Messages:
    178
    I agree with lanky that there is a ceiling with flawed technique. You can see it when you goto the local public tennis courts and see some people who have obviously never had coaching try to keep the ball in for more than 2 shots. You can see it with most players who have to develop their game on their own because coaches are really expensive. No matter how hard I went out and practiced and drilled on my own, I had an extremely inconsistent forehand that was either on fire or screaming for help as I netted ball after ball. It wasn't until I took a lesson from a local college coach that I was told that I was falling back and jumping while I was hitting my FH. I had spent the prior months messing with my wrist and my swing path, etc. only to find out that my body wasn't stable; something I wouldn't have noticed on my own.

    The reason I bring up this story is because most of us cannot judge our own games completely without some sort of biased or ignorant view on how we play. it is impossible to move up in level without having a solid coach/mentor/peer, etc. observe and help tweak your strokes, game, fitness level, etc. They should not, however, try to impose their own style of play on you, as one of my coaches tried to do for a little while(I'm 5'6 and he tried to turn me into a full-out attacking S&V).
     
    #47
  48. JohnThomas1

    JohnThomas1 Professional

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2004
    Messages:
    977
    I fully agree about the technique ceiling. I see so many guys playing at the levels below mine that could improve their game so easily. They just need the right advice and dedication.
     
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  49. Camilio Pascual

    Camilio Pascual Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2004
    Messages:
    1,825
    Thanks, Bcaz, that's a nice thing to say. I hope Mahboob writes up his full post for us. I feel badly for the girl BB told us about, her parents probably dragged her there to fulfill some fantasy of theirs. A lot of coaches tell me they often dread coaching Juniors, even though some of the greatest satisfaction is derived from coaching an eager kid who works hard and improves rapidly. Despite the rep of female players' Dads, they tell me Mom is almost always the parent who is a problem.
     
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  50. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
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    Lanky,

    That is very good insight for all of us and well explained. I think the concensus between all of us now is, we all agree that technique is important not only from a stroke standpoint but in the rest of the aspects of tennis. Also, that relaxing and allowing the body to freely adapt and execute a stroke without second guessing also contributes to develop a player further.

    It is a matter of balance and that tennis is not an isolated sport that can be managed by strict adherances to swing technique.

    I think we have also concluded that everyone learns differently. What is a good learning methodoligy for one person may not be so good for someone else. Someone people are talented and can learn by watching someone else. Others need more details and would probably seek a coach to help them understand.

    I too enjoyed this discussion. Very good topic. Even out of our "rubbing" of wings, some of us became better friends and gained more respect for each other.
     
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