Is there any disadvantage to Textured strings?

Discussion in 'Strings' started by User Name, Oct 8, 2007.

  1. User Name

    User Name Semi-Pro

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    Textured strings offer spin, help bite into the ball, and prevent string movement, is there any disadvantage to them?
     
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  2. Midlife crisis

    Midlife crisis Hall of Fame

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    But they don't. . .

    http://www.racquetsportsindustry.com/issues/200501/200501tension.html

    and specifically:

    Fortunately, the spin generated for a typical ball-racquet impact can easily be measured. This has been done at the University of Sheffield in England, and the results showed that the spin on the ball is not dependent on string tension or string type. In that testing it was concluded that all stringbeds are sufficiently "rough" to achieve maximum spin for the given shot. Therefore, even if thin, sticky, and tight strings were used in an attempt to increase stringbed "roughness," there would be no actual increase in rebound spin.

    The reality is that outside of very high level recreational players, people don't swing at the ball with the kind of racquet head speed or trajectory where there is any possibility of the ball sliding on the strings. And even then, there are other factors in determining spin generation that allow a more slick string to work better than any textured string.
     
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  3. User Name

    User Name Semi-Pro

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    wow, good post, thats impressive that all strings have the same bite. Do thinner gauges have more though?
     
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  4. Pusher

    Pusher Professional

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    "In that testing it was concluded that all stringbeds are sufficiently "rough" to achieve maximum spin for the given shot. Therefore, even if thin, sticky, and tight strings were used in an attempt to increase stringbed "roughness," there would be no actual increase in rebound spin."
     
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  5. Midlife crisis

    Midlife crisis Hall of Fame

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    Pusher has it right. Once you have enough, more doesn't help.

    There are two mechanisms which seem to help produce "extra" spin.

    The first is due to assymetrical pocketing created by the spin of the incoming ball on a groundstroke. The inertia of the ball causes the bottom of the pocket to "bunch up" and then rebound upward, helping to reverse the spin.

    The second, and in my opinion greater factor, is with a stiff, slick string like a poly string. When you hit a ball with this kind of string, it is a very short and fast transition from sliding friction to where the ball and strings are locked firmly to each other. When you hit a ball, the high stiffness of the string compresses the ball more than a more elastic string. As the ball is compressed, it's effective radius is decreased and this makes the ball spin faster than the upward racquet velocity would apply to an uncompressed ball. As the ball starts to rebound to its uncompressed shape, it is rotating faster than the upward movement of the racquet. However, because poly strings are so slick, the ball detaches from the locked coupling with the strings sooner, so it retains more of its "overspin" as compared to a regular string.
     
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