Is thinner better if durability not an issue?

Discussion in 'Strings' started by routlirh, Nov 4, 2005.

  1. routlirh

    routlirh New User

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    I'm enjoying Head syngut pps at 16 guage. Durability is not an issue as I replace before they break. Will I like 17g better? Crisper? Softer? More/less power? What should I expect?
     
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  2. NoBadMojo

    NoBadMojo G.O.A.T.

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    the main diff i have found on diff guages of most any string is that thinner guages feel crisper..the diff is a feel thing not a performence thing in general and power levels and spin are essentially the same
     
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  3. Rabbit

    Rabbit G.O.A.T.

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    IMO, thinner gauges play better.
     
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  4. modula2

    modula2 New User

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    thinner = more spin, more power, and feels more crisp

    but not by like an incredible amount hehe
     
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  5. Richie Rich

    Richie Rich Legend

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    probably won't notice too much diff if going to 17g head syn gut from 16g. maybe a little firmer, maybe a touch more spin but not that noticeable. As NBM mentioned, you'll probably have more feel.

    all things equal, thinerr guage is better, IMO anyway.
     
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  6. Flatspin

    Flatspin Rookie

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    I've not perceived enough benefit from a thinner gauge to give up any possible durability advantage that 16 can give you. Bottom line!!
     
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  7. safin_protege

    safin_protege Semi-Pro

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    I like 17g better because it has better bite, or is more crisp.
     
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  8. man-walking

    man-walking Semi-Pro

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    I have learned the lesson, finally.

    Please do not exaggerate with gauge, the more thinner the more you "suffer" incoming spin.
    If your opponent push hard (heavy balls), too thin strings tend to move around during impact in more erratic directions (than longitudinal) making frequent weird results on impact.

    The ball simply sticks or locks easily into verticals with particular force, the excessive string movement often produces unexpected rebounds and often can put you in a forced defense game (get pushed) to avoid an erratic game.

    So most modern control rackets are 18x20 (or 16x20) because today the ball rolls very heavy (and in spite of this many players feels the need to use high gauge even with dense pattern) and the stringbed stability is the first move to control the overpowering.
     
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  9. theace21

    theace21 Hall of Fame

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    Most players will tell you thinner has a better feel. But someone correct me, didn't some guy in tennis magazine explain that thicker strings actually produce more spin....
     
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  10. galain

    galain Hall of Fame

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    I think the whole concept behind Snauwaert's Hi Ten range was that the combination of very thick strings with an open pattern would produce much better spin than an average set up. Mark Woodfarde continued to play with incredibly thick strings until the end of his career, well after he'd moved on from the Hi Ten 50.
     
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  11. safin_protege

    safin_protege Semi-Pro

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    In 'Smash' magazine, Jay Schweid said that from his experience, a thicker gauge allows for more spin. He also commented that there are several opinions on the matter.

    Feel, however, is not synonymous with spin. It describes more the sensation of the ball on the strings: words like 'crisp' or 'dead' can describe feel.
     
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  12. SageOfDeath

    SageOfDeath Guest

    http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/WilsonRacquets.html
    http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/descpageRCPRINCE-GRO.html

    Looking at a few of the best sellers they don't have a more dense pattern. These racquets are known to be control oriented racquets. Granted the prince is an old school racquet but what about the ncodes?

    I don't believe the string movement can cause that much trouble. Doesn't the string deform, then form again, before the strings move. I thought string movement was an issue not during the deformation but instead when the strings don't move back to normal and you hit with it.
     
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