It felt like a tennis ball hit me in the calf!

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by Jenks10, Feb 20, 2011.

  1. Jenks10

    Jenks10 New User

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    I was pushing off at the baseline for an easy shot & I stopped immediately & said "Did I just get hit with a tennis ball?" I was in such shock when my friend said "No". Our coach helped me off the court & immediately started ice.

    As I sat there in shock, I knew this was more than just a simple calf strain. I reviewed the last 45 minutes - knowing I was completely warmed up (had just played a set of singles in 75* weather) How did this happen?!

    I am 41 years old & very active. I grew up playing soccer & only started tennis a year & 1/2 ago. I fell in love with this sport and have been hooked ever since. Ironically, I am the person that encourages others to stretch before tennis and actually incorporated a yoga DVD into my regiment a few weeks ago.

    After seeing an orthopedic doc the next day, he diagnosed me with a calf tear/strain. I cannot walk or put weight of any kind on my leg & am in a boot and on crutches. The strange thing is he pushed on my calf forcefully in many areas & to my surprise - No Pain! But, pressure from trying to walk is a different story.

    If you have had an injury similar to this, I am interested to hear about your recovery. I have been faithful with Rest, Ice & elevation and am taking an anti-inflammatory. Doc also prescribed physical therapy 3 days a week for 4 weeks.

    One lesson that I've already learned is one of compassion. This injury has touched my soul in the fact that I will reach out to those I know that become disabled with more than an "I'm so sorry". Although this injury can't begin to compare with the devastation of a permanent disability; the love, meals & visits from friends are what make this more tolerable.
     
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  2. dlk

    dlk Hall of Fame

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    Welcome to the crowd, had the same injury early last year. I was only out of commision for 3-4 weeks, so I guess mine was mild. Didn't see a physician though, just let it rest. I was 41 when I had my injury:shock:
     
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  3. Jenks10

    Jenks10 New User

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    Were you able to walk on it shortly after your injury? When you returned, were you able to really go for your shots? Or did it take a while.. Have you had any trouble since?
     
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  4. dlk

    dlk Hall of Fame

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    I could barely gingerly walk on it first couple of days. Once I came back, I was 100%. I was cautious with it first few matches back, but soon forgot about it & was sprint/jumping like it never happened. I must say, I was already in good shape for my age.
     
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  5. Jenks10

    Jenks10 New User

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    That is encouraging! Are you a singles player? My concern is will I be able to be as aggressive as I have been in singles. I run for every ball - hard angles, lunging (In good physical shape) Also, did you start stretching a few days after injury?
     
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  6. dominikk1985

    dominikk1985 Legend

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    no stetching. give it as much rest as possible until the doctor allows to do sports again.

    think about it: why would you want to stretch a torn muscle? very bad idea.
     
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  7. r2473

    r2473 Legend

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    I played with a friend of my wife's a few years ago in the park. After warming up, we started to play a match. In the first or second game, I hit an unintentional drop shot. She sprinted after it and immediately went down. Her calf immediately swelled up to something like twice normal size.

    She went to the doc and was diagnosed with a muscle tear. She was doing rehab for months in seemed like.

    Weirdest thing I had ever seen.
     
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  8. Jenks10

    Jenks10 New User

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    It is a bit of a mystery. I had already played for 45 minutes - warmed up & felt 110% physically! Can anyone elaborate on the recovery plan they did? Thanks so much.
     
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  9. r2473

    r2473 Legend

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    I'll ask her this week.

    Didn't your doc refer you to a physical therapist or someone similar? I wouldn't take *my* advice on some internet site. Get this done right.
     
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  10. Jenks10

    Jenks10 New User

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    Well said! Just curious how the rehabilitation was for others.
     
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  11. tennytive

    tennytive Semi-Pro

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    2 summers ago I had strains in one calf or the other and was limping between points. I only played once a week on Sundays. Sunday afternoon I walked very gingerly but by Wednesday I was okay again. I tried calf stretches, but next Sunday, same thing. This went on for a month or so until the weather cooled in the fall and then I had no issues.

    Last summer I took a Thermotab before leaving for the courts and made sure I sipped a sports drink diluted half and half with water on changeovers. No calf issues even in the hottest weather playing 3 times a week for over 2 hours. I got the T-tabs over the counter at a local discount pharmacy.

    I also did leg lifts for my knees and calves 2 to 3 times a week in between playing days.

    Not saying it'll work for you, but that's my experience.
     
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  12. Itagaki

    Itagaki Semi-Pro

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    Although not specifically for tears, you might consider doing the Starr Rehab once the pain starts to "blur"

    http://startingstrength.wikia.com/wiki/Injuries#Bill_Starr_Rehab_for_Muscle_Pulls

    using calf raises. Like it says though, be sure you can distinguish the kind of hurt you feel doing it, but it will help with preventing scar tissue from forming, which WILL happen if you are completely sedentary as the tear heals (making it more easily injured in the future)
     
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  13. equinox

    equinox Hall of Fame

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    happened to hitting partner.

    calf tear, booted 6+ weeks.

    6 months no tennis, running.

    2-3 years before his movement and importantly his confidence was back to similar level.

    nasty injury. rehab was a long time.
     
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  14. BMC9670

    BMC9670 Hall of Fame

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    I experienced the same thing, but to a lesser degree. Mine was really painful for a few days and then got better with R.I.C.E. I got a stretching/strengthening routine from my doctor and it helped get it back to normal. It did take a while, though. As I remember, I was a good 6 months before it felt 100%.

    This is what my doctor said I had: http://www.sportsmedicineofatlanta.com/reference/tennis_leg_common_sports_injury.html
     
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  15. spacediver

    spacediver Hall of Fame

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    It doesn't sound like your injury was a result of not being warmed up, but you shouldn't be stretching before tennis. Save the stretching for after the game, or in its own schedule. You want dynamic warmups.

    Here are some good ones:

    http://www.sportskool.com/videos/tennis-prep (they even have one for the calves).

    Anyway, sorry to hear about the injury - I hate being injured, and have been injured almost every summer for the last 3-4 years (not tennis related). This last summer was the first where I didn't get injured, and that's because I've learned how to move properly and warm up.

    Sounds like your tear is a pretty severe one. Hard to say how fast you'll recover - each muscle tear is different from the next. Best listen to your physiotherapist, but given it's a muscle, you'll probably be back in action before the summer :)
     
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  16. Jenks10

    Jenks10 New User

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    Physical Therapy Today - Yea!

    Went to the physical therapist today. She was examining my calf as I was standing & says "I can see exactly where your calf is torn" Wow - I didn't expect to hear that!

    After her assessment, she taught me a series of slow stretches to perform 3x daily & recommend icing the calf after each session. I will still see her 3 days a week and will move to water therapy soon.

    A recommendation she had was compression support socks. The ones I purchased can be found online at www.cw-x.com. They fit all the way to my knee and are for support and recovery.

    Hey, if I get to look like Bethanie Mattek-Sands & it is going to get me on the courts quicker, I'm In!!

    Thanks for all the great websites for me to look at concerning this injury.
     
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  17. pennc94

    pennc94 Semi-Pro

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    I had this injury as well, although mine was not as severe. I did not experience any bruising, but the pain was sharp.

    Therapy and active stretching helped, but most of all, playing with compression sleeves made a difference. I used the Zensah calf sleeves. I wore them for a bit even after the pain went away for precaution.
     
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  18. jbravo

    jbravo New User

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    If you go to Physical Therapy for a torn calf they will ALWAYS have you stretch followed by ice massage and sometimes electro shock. Resting alone does not help. I've done this both ways. The rested calf took much longer to heal and continues to be sensitive. The calf that I stretched healed much faster and never gives me any problems. Stretching improves flexibiilty which puts less stress on the wounded tissue. I strongly encourage physical therapy so that you get professonal advice.
     
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  19. tennis_tater

    tennis_tater Semi-Pro

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    I'm actually in PT right now for a torn calf after popping it for the 2nd time after coming back too early after the first tear. The first week following the strain, I did RICE only. Week 2, I started physical therapy and the first week consisted solely of stretching and ASTYM therapy/treatment to break up the scar tissue and help with the healing process. Starting in week 2, the PT recommended that I do away with the ice and, if anything, use heat and compression sock to get circulation going through the leg to accelerate the healing process. I just finished week 3, which consisted of the same as before + leg strengthening exercises (calf extensions, stair master, running on the eliptical). While the PT was doing the ASTYM treatment today, I could tell a remarkable difference as he was running the tools over my calf. Once week ago, there was a huge knot in my calf. Today, it was barely noticeable. While I am doing much better after week 3, I know my body just isn't ready to play competitive matches at this point. I figure another 2-3 weeks of home exercises/leg strengthening and hopefully I will be back on the court soon.
     
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  20. spacediver

    spacediver Hall of Fame

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    My general impression is that stretching is an important part of the healing process, but not during the acute injury phase.
     
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  21. matt.flynn60

    matt.flynn60 New User

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    It's also dangerous to overstretch the calf, which I see people doing all the time.
     
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  22. tennis_tater

    tennis_tater Semi-Pro

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    Is this because most people incorrectly stretch their muscles cold, without any warm-up? Must say, I've been guilty of this for years until being told during my current PT how important it is to do a warmup of some sort (bike, light jog) for at least 5 minutes or so to get the muscles loose before stretching.
     
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  23. jbravo

    jbravo New User

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    I was also concerned with this so I asked my PT if it was possible to overstretch my calf. He said it would be very difficult. My stretches consist of using a stair or Aeropbic step to stretch my calf, with one leg hanging freely for 2 MINUTES and then 2 more minutes with both feet on the ledge, knees bent. I did this 5 times a day during rehab (6 weeks). At first my calves hurt but the more I stretched, the more flexible I became and the pain went away. I realize everyone is different but this worked well for me. I did these stretches mostly cold, with no warm-up except when I went to the gym once a day, I warmed up with the stationary bicycle prior to stretching.
    Now my PT did say if I was going to play tennis to stretch after warming up the calf, but for daily routine stretching I stretched warm and cold.
     
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  24. GZim

    GZim Rookie

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    Sounds like a torn Gatrock... I did the same going for a drop shot, and it was the second time i did it, a little over 1 year apart. the second time (i was around 45) I did a lot of PT, and still occasionally go for acupuncture, and he does a little dry needling for scar tissue.
    Both times I was 6 weeks in a boot, and the second time, it was over 6 months before I played. as someone said about confidence, i still think about it sometimes when running a shot down. I do stretches, and after you are back at full strength, some extra calf raises etc are worth the effort.
    Good luck, and don't rush your recovery.
     
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  25. Mike Hodge

    Mike Hodge Rookie

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    I also recommend a Pro Stretch --- helps keep the gastroc and plantar muscle flexible.
     
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  26. Mike Hodge

    Mike Hodge Rookie

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    Just started my formal rehap with a PT. Lot's of stretching, strengthening and massage once a week --- for the feet, ankles and calves.

    Much more intensive than I imagined. I'd recommend it to anyone with a calf injury that puts in a lot of time on the court. I definitely underestimated the need for prevententive workout stuff, so you don't get injured in the first place.
     
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  27. eidolonshinobi

    eidolonshinobi Professional

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    When you finally get out of rehab you'll want to incorporate DYNAMIC stretching for your warm-up as static stretching will ruin the force-length relationship of muscles. Dynamic stretching are just active exercises/stretching that relates to your activity (i.e opposite of static stretching).

    Just be glad that you didnt have an achilles tendon tear which would have been the nex stage of this strain :/
     
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  28. tennis_tater

    tennis_tater Semi-Pro

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    I'm just starting my week 4 of PT and I agree - much more intensive than I thought. I really regret not starting PT after the first time that I strained my calf. All I did was the RICE for 3 weeks and after feeling pain free, hit the courts again. Then strained same calf again. Knowning what I know now, 3 weeks of RICE just wasn't near enough time and means of recovery.

    Here's how my PT has been going. Again, week 1 following strain, RICE only - no PT. Week 2 following strain, I started PT, which consisted solely of stretching and ASTYM therapy/treatment to break up the scar tissue and help with the healing process. The ASTYM hurt like hell as the tools went over the lump in my calf.


    Week 2 - used heat and compression socks and started leg strengthening excerises and then stationary bike and eliptical to get the blood going in the calf zone + the leg strengthening exercises. ASTYM treatments continued and pain lessened as each treatment completed.

    Week 3 - Same as above but increased weights on strengthening from 3 sets of 10 to 4 sets of 15, added the stair master machine. ASTYM treatments continue and now have small, localized bump in calf.

    Week 4 - same as above, but have now added jogging in place on a mini-trampoline to the work-out. ASTYM treatments have continued and leg feels great. Started light hitting on the court this week, simply hitting back and forth to the opponent, keeping balls in middle of court. Leg feels fine, although I can tell there is hesitation when I go to "push off" on affected leg.

    Plan at this point is to continue with PT and incorporate home exercises and gym exercises to continue build muscle strength back up and continue with light hitting. If leg continues to feel fine, my plan is to play a practice set or two next week on clay surface and then hopefully get back to regular play in 2-3 weeks.

    One of the posters above mentioned the Pro Stretch. Been using that device at home as well for past 3 weeks. Great aid to stretching at home!
     
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  29. retlod

    retlod Professional

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    Two Septembers ago, I was demoing a Speed Pro (heavier than what I was used to) and played five sets with it over about three and a half hours (longer than I was used to playing). At home later that day, I felt a pop beneath my right shoulder blade and was convinced I had broken a rib. X-rays were negative, so my best guess is that I just tore a muscle secondary to overuse. I couldn't hit a first serve for two months, but started playing again (with just kickers) a couple of weeks later. Slowly but surely, I started hitting harder and harder again. I let the faint pain in my back tell me when I was trying for too much. By three months later, it was back to normal.

    The silver lining is that without a first serve, I was forced to work on spin and placement of my second serve. It's now much better than it ever was. Depending upon my opponent and his ability to handle kickers, sometimes I use the second serve exclusively. Once you start playing again, you'll likely be very apprehansive about your calf and will want to move around the court as efficiently as possible to avoid reinjury. Voila! You'll move better, waste less energy, and be better prepared to unleash your shots!
     
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  30. Mike Hodge

    Mike Hodge Rookie

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    If I had to do it over again, I would have been much more consistent and aggressive with my stretching.

    I just started playing a year and a half ago. I started working out like a demon with agility and speed work in addition to a lot of time on the court. I didn't realize it at the time, but if you're in your late 40s as I am, you have to stretch like a demon so your body can handle the wear and tear.

    I stretched, but not nearly enough and being somewhat naturally stiff, this was a big, big mistake. I plan to be more diligent in the future, even if it means a little less agility, running, etc. I worked hard, but not necessarily smart.
     
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  31. eidolonshinobi

    eidolonshinobi Professional

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    Yeah it's a tough lesson, but at least you weren't seriously injured so when you go back out just note that you've gotta take more time to warm your body up properly.
     
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  32. ssgator80

    ssgator80 Rookie

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    This exact thing happened to me tonight. I remembered reading this post right after it happened. I literally thought some one hit me with a rock. I stopped and was looking through the fence looking for the kids that just hit me with a rock. Then I thought it must have been a tennis ball and looked for that. It was my calf muscle. I was 2 points from the match and since I lost my match the team lost the match. I was up 6-0, 5-3. 40-40. Looks like I'm down for awhile.
     
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  33. bad_call

    bad_call Legend

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    ssgator - sorry to read this. same thing happened to me years back playing soccer. should have warmed up properly. also pulled a hamstring that season.
     
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  34. atatu

    atatu Hall of Fame

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    This is really weird but this happened to me tonight playing basketball, I turned around to see what hit me then I felt the pain and started to hop around. I thought it was a cramp then tried to stretch it out, going to the doctor tomorrow, I think I was pretty dehydrated which did not help matters at all. . .
     
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  35. bad_call

    bad_call Legend

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    atatu - don't think the doc can do anything for that injury. you can pay me for saving you a trip. :)
     
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  36. atatu

    atatu Hall of Fame

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    Well, the doctor's visit was helpful because he was able to tell me that I didn't tear it, just strained it, I'm still out for at least a month, however.
     
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  37. bad_call

    bad_call Legend

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    if you tore it then there would be tissue "bunching" from the detached portion. the tear i experienced sounded almost like a gun shot when it popped. strained the other calf about a month ago and still recovering.
     
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  38. Jenks10

    Jenks10 New User

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    So sorry about your injury. My calf injury is now at the 2 week point. The PT has had me in hydro therapy which is helping tremendously! I was able to walk for the 1st time in tennis shoes today (about 20 yards without any pain!) I continue to do stretches for my calf 3x per day & will now wear my "boot" 2 hours then walk in tennis shoes for 1 hour & repeat throughout the day. Still icing in the evening if needed.
     
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  39. beernutz

    beernutz Hall of Fame

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    Great thread with lots of good information! I just experienced this injury on Monday, 4 days ago, and while I've had some improvement doing just RICE + Advil, I still can't push off with that foot while walking without pain.

    Even though this happened in March, it was around 70 degrees at the time we were playing and I wasn't hydrating as much as I normally do as my opponent barely even slowed down on side changes. After playing two long sets, the very first point of the 3rd I attempted to push off quickly to get to a short second serve and felt a pop in my calf. I think I actually heard something pop too but that might've been my imagination. Immediately afterward I could barely stand on that leg but now if I move slowly enough I don't limp but I wouldn't dream of trying to walk fast or run.

    At least I've learned my lesson about hydration and I won't let an opponent dictate how long I spending drinking during changeovers after this.
     
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  40. tennis_tater

    tennis_tater Semi-Pro

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    Just to add to the above, week 4 and 5 marked my return to playing tennis. I started out with some extremely light hitting, just hitting back and forth with my partner with limited movement. I worked on volleys and serves and played some mini-tennis to keep my movement more limited.

    After 2 or 3 sessions of light hitting, I played a couple of practice sets of doubles in week 5 on clay surface. Playing doubles also minimized my movements to 1/2 the court and I kept serve/volleys to minimum. I pretty much worked on my footwork for groundstrokes and getting timiming back. I tried not to push myself to running for drop shots of lobs.

    After getting in a couple of practice sessions with no problems, I returned to my first league match in league six weeks and made it through without incident. The match was played on clay. Prior to the match, I made sure to do the stationary bike and eliptical to loosen the muscles, followed by a good bit of stretching, and an application of ICY HOT on the calf muscle. I also wore my compression sock as a precautionary measure. Had no problems whatsoever.


    As far as physical therapy, weeks 5, 6, and 7 consisted of one visit each week to continue to the leg strengthening exercises, followed by ASTYM. I also continued my own workouts at the gym and stretching at home to supplement. I probably could have been discharged after week 4, but they wanted to have a visit scheduled once a week to monitor as I was amping up my gradual return to tennis play.

    After 7 weeks of physical therapy (2 or 3 visits/week), I have been discharged from therapy and have now returned to play with an whole new pre-match stretching regime to hopefully prevent this injury from occuring again.

    To anyone who goes through this injury, I highly recommend physical therapy as I am a firm believer in the ASTYM treatment. I went to the RICE only route the first time I strained my calf and that just was't enough.

    On another note, this month's TENNIS magazine has a two page article on calf injuries. Thought their could have been more to the article, but it still informative nonetheless.
     
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  41. atatu

    atatu Hall of Fame

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    I agree completely that hydration plays a part in this injury, that has not been stressed enough in this thread.
     
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  42. beernutz

    beernutz Hall of Fame

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    I think there was roughly a 100% chance that poor hydration played a key role in my injury. As I said before, I was thrown off my normal hydration routine by an opponent who rarely stopped to drink and also because...it was March! Who dehydrates in March? Well I do apparently, but it won't happen again if I can help it.

    It has been a week since my injury and I can now walk pretty much normally (without a limp) but still no running or tennis. Hopefully in another week I'll be back playing if I'm lucky.
     
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  43. Morgan

    Morgan Rookie

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    48 yr old here-
    Going through my second calf strain in 3 yrs. Same leg/location. I neglect to stretch as I should, but I'm not so sure that had any affect on causing the re-injury.

    I'm curious what you're doing to prevent reinjury. I used to run 3 miles every other day but stopped it for the last month before the injury and I wonder if that lack of exercise had anything to do with it. Was it poor hydration on my part?

    I'd hate to give up tennis, but I can't have this happen every year. It's totally incapacitating - crutches for a few days, pain, etc.

    I know what you're saying about having compassion - I definitely have more empathy for what others with injuries go through now.

    Wonder what you're doing to prevent re-occurrence.
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2011
    #43
  44. charliefedererer

    charliefedererer Legend

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    Stopping your running program may have had an influence. But you don't have to exlcusively run to build up your legs. Squats and deadlifts can actually build muscle. Cycling can be a less "pounding" alternative instead of always running.


    Most "strains" represent microscopic tears in tendon or muscle. That heals with scar tissue [rather than regrowing true muscle or tendon tissue], and places you at increased risk for reinjury.


    Before any tennis play always do a dynamic warm up, rather than static stretching.

    Stretching after play, and in the morning and night can help maintain flexibility, and might help prevent a recurrence.
     
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  45. Morgan

    Morgan Rookie

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    Thanks for the advice.

    Yesterday I purchased a few different kinds of compression wraps and if anyone has this injury, I highly recommend get out and purchasing them (McDavid Brand). I injured my leg a week ago and initially used a neoprene wrap that helped, but these compression sleeves help drastically and have allowed me to walk much better with the support.

    I canceled my appt w/ an MD the day after injury since this was the second time and I'm pretty much self-diagnosing the problem. I probably would be better to get into see physical therapy but I'm bypassing that as well. Probably not a great idea, but I'm used to not using the medical system unless absolutely necessary.
     
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  46. baoshuxiong

    baoshuxiong New User

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    Suffered Tennis Leg here, Day 5, Going Thru R.I.C.E.; Went to a doc and he prescribed pain killer and rubbing lotion. Question: should I put on the calf sleeve 24 / 7? or just when I go outdoors?
     
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  47. Say Chi Sin Lo

    Say Chi Sin Lo Legend

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    Just found this gem of a thread regarding calves/achilles injuries. And I have a question.

    So I believe I'm developing early signs of insertional achilles tendinitis. It doesn't affect my performance on the court but when I shut it down, there's significant pain behind my heel. After dealing with post-play discomfort for a few months, I decided to shut it down completely and just let it heal. And here is my question:

    I plan on doing as much RICE therapy for the next 2-3 weeks, just to get the inflammation to subside. Then your usual stretching and strengthening once the inflammation is gone. During my recovery, will cardio workout such as the elliptical and stationary bike hinder the healing of the achilles? And I'm going to assume running isn't going to help my cause.

    In case you were wondering how I injured it, I wish I can recall a precise event, but I can't. I'm sure I took a hard and wrong step somewhere on the tennis court (probably on an stomp volley). What I can tell you is, it's my left achilles, and I'm a righty, so it's my landing foot when I serve.

    Thanks!
     
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2012
    #47
  48. charliefedererer

    charliefedererer Legend

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2009
    Messages:
    5,639
    Sorry to hear you are having problems.

    As you undoubtedly know, inflammation is the first stage of healing. Indeed without inflammation, no healing will occur.

    Inflammation represents that the greatest number of chemicals (cytokines) is present at the site to attract and activate the fibroblasts which will produce the protein strands that will heal the microscopic tendon tears that are likely present.

    Pain is a side effect of those chemicals (cytokines) being present and irritating sensitive nerve endings.
    (It is unclear if this is just coincidence or whether this evolved as a warning signal to our forebears that an injury was in the process of healing, and that decreased activity was needed to let the injury heal.)


    RICE clearly improves the symptoms of pain and swelling.
    Nerves don't conduct pain optimally at cold temperatures.
    Compression clearly reduces swelling.
    And it is clear that on occasion our immune system can run amuck and produce more inflammation at a site than will optimally lead to healing.
    It is just hard to know in your situation if other than Rest, RICE really will alter the underlying inflammatory process in a productive way.



    It takes many, many weeks for the protein fibers in connective tissue to interconnect and become really strong.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    There is no foolproof way to know when exercise can begin, or how fast to advance our exercise level.
    We tend to use pain as a guide - return of pain indicates inflammation is beginning again because of reinjury.
    So sometimes it is two steps forward and one step backward.
    The danger in a "go-getter" like you or Nadal is not to make it one step forward and two steps backward by doing too much exercise too soon.


    At least you are doing the best thing now by resting, so that the process of healing can occur as straight forward as possible, instead undergoing multiple episodes of partial healing and tearing, partial healing and tearing that leads to fibrosis and tendon degeneration.
    [​IMG]
     
    #48
  49. charliefedererer

    charliefedererer Legend

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2009
    Messages:
    5,639
    Most put on the sleeve soon after getting up and leave it on throughout the day, then remove it at bedtime.

    If it feels way too tight, it IS TOO TIGHT - so take it off right away.

    Beware of ankle swelling. If the ankle swells, it means you should be wearing a compression stocking that includes the foot and ankle areas as well as the calf.


    "C" in RICE stands for compression, and that is what the calf sleeve is attempting to do. Compression reduces excess swelling, and often supports muscle so that it is less painful.
    Unless the area is very swollen, if the pain is much better, then perhaps you are getting close to no longer needing the compression, although obviously I would defer to the advice of your doctor who has examined you and better knows your condition.


    Outside of the REST, there is little evidence that RICE, rubbing lotion and pain medications actually speed the healing process. So if the area is feeling much better you may be getting closer to no longer do this therapy - again with your doctors advice being still the best.
     
    #49
  50. baoshuxiong

    baoshuxiong New User

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2012
    Messages:
    40
    Thanks charliefederer for your reply. It's very helpful.

    I couldn't walk during Day 1-3 due to severe pain; but now I can walk for like 45 mins with calf sleeve and walking stick. It's a very humbling experience.

    I only had mild swelling but still can't stretch my calf (even in normal walking stand). I'm also using heat lotion (will try Voltaren once heat rub runs out) & warm clothe 4 times a day. It seems to help just a tiny bit.

    It's embarrassing to use a walking stick at my age, but I'm gonna stick to it till I can walk w/o pain in my calf. The only side effect right now is twitches on my upper calf (every 10 mins or so) when I walk .

    Question: What's my next step? Stretching? When can I start stretching ? When I feel no pain when I walk?

    Thx for your reply in advance :)
     
    #50

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