Join PUT-OFF!!??? (Merged Foot Fault Threads)

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by Jet Rink, Feb 15, 2005.

  1. LeftyServe

    LeftyServe Semi-Pro

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    "Cheating" implies intention, doesn't it? An inadvertent foot fault here and there is not the same as knowingly calling an "in" ball "out." I don't think the majority of people who occasionally (or even frequently) foot fault do so with an awareness or an intention to gain an advantage....
     
  2. chess9

    chess9 Hall of Fame

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    No intention is required.

    -Robert
     
  3. LeftyServe

    LeftyServe Semi-Pro

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  4. JavierLW

    JavierLW Hall of Fame

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    You are still wrong, you dont need an official to call it, revisit the rules. (or read them from this very thread)
     
  5. chess9

    chess9 Hall of Fame

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  6. Bud

    Bud Bionic Poster

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    KK, I noticed in your signature about foot faults...

    Unless playing in a tournament, where others may call such faults for us... is it really possible to accurately see a singles opponent foot fault and identify it properly? Let's face it... most people have trouble calling lines on their side of the court :lol:

    So, to notice and accurately identify a potential foot fault from an opponent 80+ feet away... not to mention while preparing physically and mentally to return serve seems questionable, at best.

    Beside that, would such a foot-faulter really obtain any advantage by stepping over or slightly on the line, while serving, at the club level?
     
    Last edited: Jun 19, 2008
  7. Kaptain Karl

    Kaptain Karl Hall Of Fame

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    Bud - Your post was moved here from that other thread. (An attempt to keep the *other* thread on-topic.)

    My posts in the PUT-OFF thread don't need to be repeated. And this (PUT-OFF) thread has some pretty entertaining arguments....

    - KK
     
  8. Steady Eddy

    Steady Eddy Hall of Fame

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    The people I learned tennis from felt that foot faults were not something to worry about. It was considered bad form to ever call one on your opponent. Even at the college level it was considered strange to call a foot fault. Case in point: in the NCAA tournament, one player lost by being called for a foot fault on his 2nd serve for match point. So his opponent won the match! Even his opponent thought that was weird. Also relevant, was that not one foot fault had been called previously in that match. So there seems to be an understanding that foot faults shouldn't be called 100% of the time.
     
  9. slice bh compliment

    slice bh compliment G.O.A.T.

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    ^This exact scene played out on a match pt in the 3rd set TB of an ATP Challenger this past year. The guy who lost the match on a 2nd serve footfault went absolutely crazy. It seemed unjust.

    On the other hand, he needs to grow up. He violated a rule and was called on it. The timing was awful, but is that the official's fault?

    It is if the kid had footfaulted and was never called on it UNTIL match point.

    I think this goes back to consistent and firm enforcement of the rules, especially in officiated matches.

    When I coached, I certainly taught each student that footfaulting was wrong. I'd be disappointed in myself if I ever footfaulted, or if one of my kids did. I tell my friends, just out of concern. But I don't call it on my opponents. I guess I would if I were competing in tournaments. Maybe, maybe not.

    Separate issue. Who FF's more, men, women or kids?
    I'm thinking the thickest FF demographic is middle aged men trying to get to the net in dubs.
     
  10. 5263

    5263 G.O.A.T.

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  11. Taxvictim

    Taxvictim Semi-Pro

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    I was watching a couple of mature 4.0-4.5 men playing singles at a public court last week. One guy's foot fault was so blatant, I moved around to get a better view. He was a right-hander. He would start with his left foot parallel to the base line (legal), but would turn the foot at right angle toward the net immediately when he began his toss, so half of his foot was over the line as the ball was going up. Half the time, he would drag his right foot over the line before he hit the ball, so both feet were over the line at contact.

    He noticed my interest in his feet, and the foot-faulting diminished greatly.

    Based on other observations, I agree with the comment made three years ago in this thread that better players tend to FF more often.
     
  12. Schmerl

    Schmerl New User

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    If you admit you know and FF every serve, do you lose?

    I Hate the blatant repeaters. I never call minor stuff, tell opponents nicely between games. Has never been a competitive problem for me. When I was 3.0 I noticed it all the time. Now 4.0 10 years later and I look at the ball. Its faster and I'm older (49), so I never notice. Teammates ask me after. Didn't you notice your opponent foot faulting every serve? My feet are still so I never FF. MY dbls partner does and I try to correct it but it lasts maybe 3 serves until he lapses back. And he won a sportsmanship award so he is not intentionally cheating but it is still cheating. In practice I often just start a foot inside the baseline to serve just so he'll notice, tell him that's where he serves from.

    Unofficiated: Ask nicely once, remind a 2nd time, start calling. If opponent can't handle it he's a cheater anyway. case closed.

    I was watching a pair on my mixed team finish a match. The opponent man was FF by 12 inches every serve. He is 6'3" and serve & volley. He got in 8 of 9 first serves. I watched with his captain, pointed it out. He said, Oh, Ed (the offending player) knows about it, we tell him all the time.

    Thus Ed knows he is cheating. By the code in my mind, Ed loses or defaults the match. Any agreement? I did not pursue with coordinator. We are out of playoff picture and everyone so nice but I feel it should be my team's point. Fact is though, my players on court did not notice and this was as bad as it gets. No outside help allowed during a match.
     
  13. David_Is_Right

    David_Is_Right Semi-Pro

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    Excellent thread! I think I'll actually have the cahones to call this next time I play (it invariably will.)

    I was playing doubles last week, and I brought it up in the weakest way possible by mentioning it loudly to my own partner about the opponent. I received a tut from the opponent net player, as if I was wrong to even mention it... It matters, damn it!

    Next week I'm going to stand up to these cheaters. There's a few middle-aged guys that come along to my club's group coaching sessions that seem to revel in trying to subvert every drill in some way, and then go on to foot fault like crazy.
     
  14. Kaptain Karl

    Kaptain Karl Hall Of Fame

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    Wow! A "blast from the past" thread....

    After he could no longer play my 79 year old grandfather used to sit in the stands and loudly call, "Foot-fault!" whenever his neighbors did so. They were amazingly persistent. He'd go hoarse before they'd change their behavior.

    - KK
     
  15. HipHerring

    HipHerring New User

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    I thought I was all alone in calling footfaults. Certainly feels that way in high school tennis. I called a foot fault in one of my doubles matches and the other guys looked shocked as hell. I just said, "You don't feel both your feet moving into the court?"
     
  16. David_Is_Right

    David_Is_Right Semi-Pro

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    Indeed - I looked up your signature!
     
  17. David_Is_Right

    David_Is_Right Semi-Pro

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    Yep, shock seems to be the usual response. Incredulity to almost the same extent as if you'd called a fault because your opponents racquet was "too blue".
     

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