jr player

Discussion in 'Racquets' started by katelyn16, Feb 15, 2012.

  1. katelyn16

    katelyn16 New User

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    Feb 14, 2012
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    i have a 10 yr old tournament player using prince graphite classic oversize strung with pro blend. im taking a lot of heat from my teaching buddies about the weight of racket. need some input on this subject. thanks
     
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  2. mikeler

    mikeler Moderator

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    They should also be giving you heat about a 10 year old playing with the super stiff Prince Pro Blend.
     
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  3. RoughOG

    RoughOG Rookie

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    Well, how is your junior playing with the graphite? If he/she is good with it then no need to change. If he/she is having trouble let him/her demo a couple lighter sticks. But on the strings some PSGD or other synthetic gut would be more appropriate than the pro blend.
     
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  4. fuzz nation

    fuzz nation Legend

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    If you've got a little peanut on your hands who's already "killin' it", it's hard to argue with success. I'd say to try and trust your eyes though. If this junior's technique looks somehow restricted, then consider sampling an alternative, but be careful with that, too. Since this kid has already accumulated the timing and muscle memory to play well with a POG, a lighter alternative might be trouble if it's more than a few tenths of an ounce less hefty.

    A couple summers ago, I let a girl around 9-10 yrs. old (not a tournament player, btw) borrow a Prince NXG mid-plus for a lesson and she fell in love with it. I eventually gave her one with a smaller, more cozy grip size for her and she's still using it. That's a frame well over 12 oz. with lots of head-light balance, but it's turned out to be a great fit for her. That surprise convinced me to avoid any heavy verdict as far as what gear is appropriate for any player. Guidelines can be helpful, but they're not gospel.

    As far as those strings go, I'm not too big on kevlar hybrids myself, but at least the good news in this case is that this Problend is going into one of the most arm-friendly racquets of all time (according to racquet nerds, reputation, etc.). If that string was going into a racquet that was lighter, stiffer, or a combo of both, that might be a little more perilous. If your little gunner needs some better, more lively response from that frame, there are a bundle of decent synthetic gut or multifiber options out there to sample.
     
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