Jumping on Forehand/Serve

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by Chopin, Dec 29, 2013.

  1. Chopin

    Chopin Hall of Fame

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    I googled Talk Tennis recently and come across a youtube video from a banned poster in which he argues that the pros consciously jump on their forehands. Does any one know where the original thread is?
     
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  2. Chopin

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    The video is poor quality and the (banned) poster says that when players want to hit a hard forehand, they will use an open stance and jump. Does any one know the video I'm talking about?
     
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  3. psv255

    psv255 Professional

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    Seen the video, not sure about the poster or thread. That guy seemed like a legitimate internet coach, all legitimate coaches have Blackberries
     
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  4. Topspin Shot

    Topspin Shot Legend

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    Pros don't jump on purpose, except maybe on a (very) rare high ball. If the leave the ground, it is part of the kinetic chain.
     
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  5. boramiNYC

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    OP, why do you ask?
     
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  6. Cheetah

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    i saw that video a couple of years ago and i actually seached and found the thread somehow at that time. I used search terms by using a few key words he said in the video along with 'jumping on the forehand', 'banned' and looked at posts within a week of the video. So that's how i found it. If i could you can.
     
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  7. Chopin

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    The video is obviously a mess and seems more like a joke, but I do have some questions about the jumping "debate." I was never taught to jump and when I've seen pictures of myself after serving, both of my feet may be off the ground, but I don't consciously jump. Do some of you guys consciously jump on your shots?

    The poster argued that all ATP pros jump on the serve and forehand (and he says "not the backhand"), but the most prominent examples of jumping I know of are actually on the backhands. Malisse, Baghdatis...maybe Nishikori.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CErM1DtO6kU

    Now that's clearly jumping, and that seems different than what most pros do when we see their feet off of the ground. Any thoughts?

    Yours always,
    Chopin
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2013
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  8. WildVolley

    WildVolley Legend

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    Actually, I don't believe you know what any particular pro does or does not think about when he's hitting the ball unless you've personally asked him and then you'd also need to determine whether he's telling you the truth.

    Pros only go into the air because they jump, but tennis players don't like the idea of jumping so they refer to the kinetic chain (jumping is part of the chain) or false explanations such as "momentum from the swing carries you into the air."

    I've become a firm believer in studying movement patterns rather than subjective thoughts because training can change what we think about when we play. For example, when I am serving I mostly think about hitting a target. However, it wasn't always that way. I used to work on certain aspects of my serve consciously which are now subconsciously controlled.
     
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  9. WildVolley

    WildVolley Legend

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    I sometimes consciously jump to lower the contact point or to get to a ball. Other times I jump but it is just a result of trying to hit the ball hard. In those cases, I'm definitely jumping into the shot but it isn't something I'm thinking about.

    The old teaching advice to never jump isn't correct. At the same time, jumping isn't necessary on most shots and it would be silly to teach a player to always jump (a hop is more accurate than a larger "jump" in most cases). Jumping should probably be consciously taught to players working on hitting a bigger serve if other aspects of technique are correct.

    I've taught specific "hopping" drills for the serve with students who tend to over-rotate into the shot and lose power.
     
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  10. Chopin

    Chopin Hall of Fame

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    Interesting that you should write that about the serve. When I play matches, I've found that it makes such a big difference on my serve to always pick a spot and type of serve, and focus just on that. It takes a surprising amount of focus to do it for each and every serve, but it's made a big difference for my game!

    I think that's the issue you're pointing to though--a pro might not be conscious of the exact mechanics of their stroke as they extend to movement.
     
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  11. maxpotapov

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    I agree, "jump" is really a bad word to teach tennis technique.

    Getting one's feet off the ground can be achieved in numerous ways, but "jump" is a more defined effort totally inapplicable to tennis or even harmful. Unless your name is Gael Monfils.
     
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  12. WildVolley

    WildVolley Legend

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    I would guess most pros are not consciously aware of what they are doing unless it is a recent technique change (which actually does happen even at the highest levels of the game). That is because they have thousands of hours of practice behind them and the brain can easily accomplish what it wants without conscious thought.

    I'm a juggler. I can easily juggle five objects in a standard pattern without much more conscious thought than "juggle these beanbags" or "I'm juggling things." However, it is mistake to suggest that is good instruction on how to learn how to juggle five objects. If I tell you the best way to learn how to juggle five objects is to "just do it and don't think about it" I'd be giving you poor advice. Most of us will need to make conscious movements when we're learning. With enough repetition the subconscious takes over and we can perform the movements without attention.

    Again, this is why I'm not a big fan of studying mental states. Focus on movements patterns to improve your tennis. Don't feel bad if you have to "think" about a new movement or if it feels unnatural. Playing tennis isn't natural and you can learn new things.
     
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  13. maxpotapov

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    Having said this^^ I do jump sometimes when I try to smash some hard to reach ball on the run. Just a safety measure not to wreck my legs or back in some twisted motion.

    Playing on the hard courts, I'm always cautious to be light on my feet, so most of my forehands are hit with (technically) both feet off the ground. But it's more like hopping from one foot to another, not jumping.
     
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  14. psv255

    psv255 Professional

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    Just an aside, you've got some great groundstrokes, really digging the 1hbh!
     
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