jumping rope for plantar fasciitis

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by J-Mac, Jan 30, 2009.

  1. J-Mac

    J-Mac New User

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    I have flat feet and plantar fasciitis

    Anyone found jumping rope helps?

    It seems counter intuitive but I'm finding it strengthens my feet which helps my feet support my weight better.

    As long as you don't land on your heels I think it doesn't cause more inflamation.

    The other key thing is that I stretch out like crazy every day. I stretch my calves and hamstrings.

    ______________________________
    http://www.tennistour.org
    where players play too much and get plantar fasciitis
     
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  2. 10isNE1?

    10isNE1? New User

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    I would think that would be the worst thing possible for PF. I had a severe case of it and haven't had any trouble now for years. The best thing in my opinion, is deep tissue massage in the arch area, yoga style stretching of your hamstrings with a strap while lying on your back with your foot flexed (the hamstrings do affect the arch area of the foot. It's all connected), and orthotics professionally made by a podiatrist that are moulded to your feet.
     
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  3. scotus

    scotus Legend

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    I have had several bouts with PF.

    Previously stretching the fascia area in the morning and several times during the day did the trick.

    This time around, however, it has been a whole lot worse. No amount of stretching, icing, ibuprofen, deep-tissue massage, podiatrist-made orthotics, or even the cortisone shot has worked.

    But I find that the night splints ("boots") have been helping the most.

    I would urge all who are suffering from serious PF to get a pair of those splints if you have not tried them.
     
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  4. J-Mac

    J-Mac New User

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    yeah, I agree the night splints make a huge difference.

    It's all about stretching out the back of the legs and calves to relieve the tension in the tendons under the foot.

    I'm not able to run without aggravating the condition. I can bike but it doesn't strengthen my lower legs and feet enough to help with tennis.

    I found jump roping is great. You'd be surprised how weak your feet get if you set around all day. I think this is part of the reason I got plantar fasciitis to begin with. Jumping rope strengthens your feet.

    It's probably not the best thing to try if you are right in the middle of full blown fasciitis.

    ______________________________
    http://www.tennistour.org
    where players play too much and get plantar fasciitis
     
    #4
  5. scotus

    scotus Legend

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    Jump-roping, heel-lifting, and stretching are indeed too much if you have severe PF like I do.

    If you feel that any of these activities hurt and feel like they are tearing the soft tissues, then I suggest you stop.

    The good thing about the night splints is that it provides a very mild, gentle stretch to the area. But over many hours it accomplishes a nice stretch without doing further damage to the inflamed area.
     
    #5
  6. Spawn of Cthulhu

    Spawn of Cthulhu New User

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    You might want to consider special footwear off the court. My PF has gotten much better after I started wearing MBT shoes at work (often on my feet for 8-10 hours) and Chaco flipflops at other times.
     
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  7. dennis10is

    dennis10is Banned

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    I had/have PF, have custom orthos for my tennis shoes but have now completely switched to MBT shoes. What to do with 300 pairs of "regular" shoes :)
     
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  8. swedechris

    swedechris Banned

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    in what way do the MBT shoes specifically help out for you ?? i am thinking of buying a pair..all advice appreciated.
     
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  9. Spawn of Cthulhu

    Spawn of Cthulhu New User

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    It's hard to explain (though their website tries to give a good scientific rationale). I think that the constant slight rocking back and forth (which you don't notice after a few hours the first time you try them out) serves to constantly stretch out the plantar fascia.
    The Chaco flipflops (or sandals) are apparently endorsed by the national podiatric society as being well-shaped/made.
    In both cases, I've been wearing them frequently since September and have noticed huge improvements in my PF pain (and also in my chronic low back pain, from postural improvements). I thought it might be placebo effect initially but have come around to believe in them (mainly from the way the pain goes away almost immediately when I wear them, quicker than with my usual shoes).
    The MBT shoes normally go for around $250 in a variety of relatively unattractive styles. Do a search online for "MBT discontinued" and you can often find last year's models for over $100 off. The Chaco sandals can be obtained online for less than $70. I recommend both highly.
     
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  10. Craig8592505

    Craig8592505 New User

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    I had really bad PF a few years ago. The few times I tried jumping rope during that time, I could feel it was putting a ton of pressure where my foot is most vulnerable.

    The point about strengthening the foot and supporting muscles is well taken though. If you just let those muscles atrophy, you are just asking for more PF eventually. My podiatrist basically said the same thing when he told me not to keep taping my foot forever - at some point you have to stress things again and let the muscles get stronger and improve your flexibility.

    But for me, jumping rope put WAY too much pressure where I didn't want it. My PF is all but gone now, but a sure way for me to get some of that pain back is to either run a lot, or jump rope. And I've been through too much to risk that.

    I'm sure this stuff is old hat to PF sufferers, but here is what worked for me:

    - Anti-inflamatory regimen, my podiatrist prescribed something for me.
    - Icing - buy some of those paper dixie cups, mix up some epsom salt with water, fill up the dixie cups and freeze them. Then use them as an ice rub for the bottom of your foot after exercise.
    - Rest - don't do stuff that hurts. This is an extremely difficult injury to overcome. In all likelihood you will have to give up some/all of the normal activities you do and switch to PF-friendly activities - swimming, cycling, etc. Go slow or you'll have PF forever.
    - Inserts - My podiatrist made me custom inserts that I wore all the time. I can't say for sure if they made a difference, but when you are dealing with something as troublesome as PF, you don't want to go half-ass with treating it.
    - Lose weight - this is really the number one thing. Getting down to your target weight will save a ton of stress on your feet. Obviously this is the hardest one to do, but it is important to remember that being overweight absolutely contributes to PF.
    - Tape - this really put me over the hump. I was trying everything and wasn't making much progress until finally I decided to tape my foot all the time. Three strips vertically along the bottom of my foot from heel to toe, and then a bunch of strips horizontally heel to toe to keep that in place. You want to be careful that you leave enough flexibility for your ankle.
    - Stretching - I did calve stretches all the time, certainly before/after any exercise.

    I think part of the benefit of taping and inserts is psychological - in your mind you are doing something to support your foot, which takes your mind off it somewhat. When you are too much focused on the injury, you can sometimes overcompensate and start walking/running, etc. unnaturally, which can aggrevate the PF.
     
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